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a guide to the worlds militaries

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posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 10:58 AM
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Okay what I'm going to attempt to create is a comprehensive look at the different military services of all the countries in the world. Okay the first country I'm gonna do is South Korea's Navy.



Missions

The mission of the navy during peacetime is not only to deter war, but also to protect national and maritime sovereignty, and perform activities that support national foreign policies and enhance national prestige. Its mission during war is to guarantee the safety of activities at sea by protecting the sea lines of communications (SLOCs), the life line of the country, and exercising control over the sea. At the same time, it must prevent enemy activities at sea, and carry out surprise amphibious operations against the enemy's side and rear areas.


Organisation
The navy, with nearly 40,000 personnel, is organized into three fleets under the Operations Command: in the East and Yellow Seas and the Korea Strait. Each fleet command possesses combat vessels such as destroyers, escorts, and high-speed boats. Also, the Operations Command possesses vessels and aircraft in order to conduct main component operations including anti-submarine, mine, amphibious, and salvage operations and special warfare.

I would just like to note how similiar this is to the US's Navy organisation. Each command has their own destroyers , subs, ampbibious boats, patrol boats, and even special reaction/ special mission units. Except right know there not a global super power like the US, so they don't have as many commands. Here is a quote I found intresting though, March 2001 ROK President Kim Dae-jung said that South Korea would create a new "strategic mobile fleet" consisting of destroyers, submarines and anti-submarine aircraft. In a speech before graduating midshipmen at the Korea Naval Academy in the southeastern port city of Chinhae, President Kim said, ``We will soon have a strategic mobile fleet that protects state interests in the five big oceans and play a role of keeping peace in the world.''


Looks like South Korea wants to play a greater role in the world, I'm glad other nations are starting to step up to the plate with us.

source


Well that was it, theirs plenty of area's of discussion there, plus this is just the first one.
I'm sure I'll and other people will dig up more cool info.


oh yeah the reason I'm doing this and the other threads, is because it will make my job of organizing threads in this forum easier, if theirs less.

[edit on 27-7-2005 by blue cell]




posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 11:58 AM
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Your discription of the South Korean navy is really a great start, but I would really like to know more about what the U.S. has to do with organilzational expertise, weapons supply, sales and training.

Does the U.S. accompany South Korea on missions with manpower and/or navel vessels? What type of war games do they take part in? Do they have units like our navy seals?

I would especially like to know how they stack up against the North Korean navy?

You have opened up so many areas of analysis that I would really like you to expand on your initial information.

If you get chance I would also like to know how you compare the Israeli navy with the South Korean.

Best regards!

Thanks very much for the information?



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 02:50 PM
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Originally posted by monk84
Your discription of the South Korean navy is really a great start, but I would really like to know more about what the U.S. has to do with organilzational expertise, weapons supply, sales and training.
You have opened up so many areas of analysis that I would really like you to expand on your initial information.



Thanks man, your review was much appreciated, and I'll start getting on that stuff as soon as I can!



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 04:31 PM
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I am really looking forward to you sharing more of your incisive intel. I will see what I can dig up on the subject which might be of interest to you.

Enough said. Thanks



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 06:02 PM
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Originally posted by monk84

I would especially like to know how they stack up against the North Korean navy?



Well dude I've looked all over the internet, and I can find no info on their naval vessels. But I'll try and compare them in their missions, and stuff.

[edit on 27-7-2005 by blue cell]



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 07:43 PM
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I checked Google under "South Korean Special Forces" and they have a tremendous amount of information on both North and South Korean special ops. I have spent the past hour on the different sites which I culled from the different directions I got led into and I hardly scratched the surface. I will keeep digging and as I go I will share with you the best leads and info I get.

As far as the Israeli special ops, I saw when I was in Israel one of the places where the Americans and the Israeli troops train together. It is between Masada and the Dead Sea. The terrain is extremely rugged and amid high mountains in the desert. Not a place to get lost in without water and a compass. It is ringed with mountains which conceal the most sophicated intelligence gathering devices in that part of the world. Our money is definitely not wasted on that country.

I do know that the Shayetet 13 or S13 is one of the most highly trained special ops units that the IDF (Israeli Defence Forces) has at its command. I have spent a lot of time searching the web and there's an amazing amount of info on their armed forces. I just started by punching up the "IDF" and went from there.

Your research on the Korean navy has brought me up to date on much of that area. And yes it is excellent to see other nations putting in a fair share of time, manpower and machinery into the defence of freedom. We sure should get what we pay for.

You have gotten me on the hunt for more information then I have dug up in the past. Please tell me if I am giving you information that you are well aware of and I will try and get to other avenues which you might suggest.

Much thanks for geting me back into worldwide military info,
Monk84



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 09:26 PM
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People, replie to this! He has just uncovered so many area's or discussion! Okay um I've already posted about Israeli special forces in my thread special forces profiles. Direct all stuff about special forces there, this thread is suppose to cover the main services of different countries.

[edit on 27-7-2005 by blue cell]



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 11:13 PM
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I found your thread on special forces and will direct such material to that site.

Is covert military intelligence of different countries a proper subject for this forum?



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 11:23 PM
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Can somone do Japan/Brazil/S Africa please!!!



posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 04:12 AM
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Article 9 of the japanese constitution disallows building up a military, so they founded as defensive force the "self-defence forces", actually some politicans want to change the constitution so japan can get again offensive forces. Mainly cuz of the conflict(non-military) between Japan and China. The usage of japanese forces in Iraq was already against article 9 of the japanese constitution.

They have no long-range attack abilitys, like middle and long range rockets, long range bombers, refueling planes, special forces, combat divers, nor they have big ammonation-warehouses or rules of engagement. Japan has actually a military budget of 45 billion dollar, half of the money is spent for wages of the soldiers, the other half for other things (buying new weapons, ammonation....)

The first time SDF worked in a foreign country was with the UN in 1992 in cambodcha to protect the first free elections, the first time they worked in a foreign country without of allowance of UN was in 2004 in Iraq, where they work as peacekeepers.

The self-defence forces consist of 246,400 Soldiers:

land-SDF: 148,200
see-SDF: 44,400
Air-SDF: 46,000
Reserve: 48,4000

The see-SDF is the most important part, as Japan is an island.
Especially its seen as important to have a good defence against submarines and the enemies airforce by japanese military leaders.

Similar the airforce is equipped, the 280 fighters are mainly interceptors.

The army also is fitted into that concept and is mainly intended to fight the enemies landing-operations.

This is, for the moving of troops, especially complicated because of the mountain-character of japan, the long coastlinies and the high number of ilses.

For that reason the japanese army doctrine especially wants to protect important centres and lines of communication, and also the delaying of the enemy till enough US forces come to support, moving troops trough helicopter is an improtant thing for the japanese doctrine.

The close interlocking with US forces is a central element of the japanese military strategy. two US aircraftcarriers, 180 fighters and 21,000 US Marines are always based on Japan.
More and more the PRC is seen as a potential military danger for Japan.

The change of japanese defence agenda in december 2004 is to see in relation to this. It allows Japan now to take part on the US rocket-defence programm, and to equip the own airforce with refuleing planes. Also Japan plans to take more part on international military operations.

Japan also is in maximum allowed to spend 1% of its GDP for the self defence forces.
Land forces:1

200 - Type 90 MBT
870 - Type 74 MBT
90 - recontank Typ 89
840 - IFV/APC Type 60, Type 76, Type 82
110 - Rocket launcher Typ 75 and MLRS
300 - self propelled artillery Typ74, Typ75, M-110A2
460 - howitzer FH70 155mm
helicopters
60 - AH64
84 - AH1
46 - UH-60
40 - CH-47
180 - Oh-6
3 - AS-332

Air force:
fighters:
203 F-15
104 F-4
190 F-2
27 - recon RF-4E/EJ
199 T-4 trainers
48 T-3 Trainers
16 T-1 A/B/ / Trainer
12 T-400 trainers

other planes:
13 recon E-2
4 recon E-767
1 - B-747 transport
27 C-1 transport
16 C-130 transport
13 YS-11 transport

helicopters:
25 UH-60
17 CH-47
15 KV-107

air defence:
120 Patriot-starters

Navy:
26 destroyers (the 4 biggest ones are AEGIS(Congo Class))
29 fregates
3 korvettes
19 submarines
10 speed boats
4 amphbious ships
27 mine warfare vessels
recon planes:
109 P-3s
Helicopters:
70 SH-60
60 HSS-2(Sea King)
10 MH-53J



posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 07:28 AM
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Originally posted by monk84
I found your thread on special forces and will direct such material to that site.

Is covert military intelligence of different countries a proper subject for this forum?


Well all I can say is it hasn't been moved, and it really woudn't get any replies any were else.



posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 07:59 AM
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In 1988 the fleet contained approximately seventy combat vessels, including three submarines, three missile-armed hydrofoils, twenty-two fast attack craft equipped with Israeli-built Gabriel missiles, and thirty-two coastal patrol boats. In assembling its fleet, the navy had shunned large vessels, preferring small ships with high firepower, speed, and maneuverability. The Reshef-class fast attack craft, the heart of the Israeli fleet, had a range of about 2,400 kilometers. The fleet operated in two unconnected bodies of water--on the Mediterranean Sea, where major naval ports were located at Haifa and Ashdod, and on the Gulf of Aqaba, with a naval facility at Elat. The first Reshefs were stationed in the Red Sea but were redeployed to the Mediterranean, via the Cape of Good Hope, after the return of the Sinai Peninsula to Egypt. As of 1988, the naval units protecting shipping on the Gulf of Aqaba were primarily Dabur-class coastal patrol boats.
source


Okay here is one thing that is very similiar with the navy's, they both have a lot of interdiction boats. The only thing is their used for different purposes. The South Korean Navy uses them, to patrol here shores against a North Korean Commando invasion. Israel uses them to catch terrorists trying to smuggle themselves into the country, and of course to protect ships from suicide boats. But I think the difference is Israel is a regional superpower, and I don't think it really wants to change that. By that I mean its not aiming to have bases all over the world, like South Korea is. Although it does have a formidable military, and is a world power. So that is the main difference I see, Israel wants to protect its self from terrorists, and countries around it, thats why it has fast boats, with a lot of firepower. South Korea on the other hand, wants to be a global power, thats why they also have a nice blue water navy. Was that good/



posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 11:24 AM
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Okay people if your intrested in doing one of these things contact me, we can make a plan or someting! You don't have to though, but it would be good if you did.



posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 11:25 AM
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Yes. That about says it all. Thanks



posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 03:07 PM
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I have searched a multitude of sources and have found almost nothing on the North Korean secret service. This did not surprise me since the North is such a closed society that any information would seem very diffucult to find.

What was available was mostly reports on the information and equipment found on the interdiction of North Korean spies. In one case the NIS said two spies quote " arrived at Onpyong-ri coast of Cheju island on Aug. 29, 1995, having left Nampo, North Korea in a vessel disguised as a fishing boat...in their posession of deadly weapons-including silencers, guns with poison bullets, wireless communication and other esponage equipment...showed they were armed infiltrator agents.
three shotguns,
44 bullets,
two poison guns,
three lethal suicide drugs,
2 counterfeit resident's cards,
and 18 types of crytograms
are among some 1,404 items conficated along
with $61,100 and W 748,900 in cash"

They sure didn't travel light. But it was also stated that they burried these items.


As far as the South Korean inteligence services is concernedthere there is a large amount of information. It starts from the KCIA which started in 1961 to the NSP in 1981 to it's presaent day National Intelligence Service (NIS), which came into being in 1999. This information and much more was readably available on Google and other sites.

As you described in depth about the North Korean naval operations as being internationally oriented, so the NIS is also operating in the same manner.

I would really like to know what information you have on the North Korean secret service, since I sure came up short.



posted on Aug, 2 2005 @ 09:23 AM
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The ROK Marine Corps is a special force taking charge of landing operations, which is accomplished by the navy with landing parties aboard landing crafts, fleets and aircraft. They attack the enemy's seashore from the sea or ground landing sites. The ROK Marines has the ability to accomplish missions which include ground battles, special fighting scenarios, facility protection and security services. Whenever there's a call for duty, they are as responsive as 911 rescue.

Until recently, the ROKMC fleet of Amphibious Vehicles consisted of sixty-one Landing Vehicles Tracked (LVT) and forty-two AAV7A1. Additionally, in an effort to replace the LVTs, the ROKMC is in the final year of a fifty-seven vehicle, three-year AAV7A1 co-production effort. The ROKMC is in the process of modifying that contract and producing an additional sixty-seven additional AAV7A1 vehicles.

A major naval evolution during Foal Eagle 2000, an annual combined U.S. and Republic of Korea (ROK) exercise, was an amphibious assault launched by U.S. and ROK Marines from U.S. Navy ships belonging to 7th Fleet's permanently forward-deployed Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) based in Japan.
source

Here are some links about that exercise, link 1

www.globalsecurity.org..." target="_blank" class="postlink">link 2








Here is a little info about the exercise,
Foal Eagle counter-infiltration exercises are large combined annual field training exercises for U.S. and ROK forces. FOAL EAGLE is the Combined Forces' Command's primary FTX. It's primary training audience is tactical units and functions. It is a multifaceted Joint and Combined Exercise that trains in all aspects of CFC's mission: Rear Battle Area Protection, RSOI, Special Operations, and conventional Multi-Service Force -on-Force. Selected CONUS based U.S. units with OPLAN taskings are brought to Korea to participate in this exercise. The Foal Eagle Exercise is an annual ROK-US combined field maneuver conducted since 1961. Its purposes are to demonstrate ROK-US military resolve to deter war on the Korean peninsula and to improve the combined and joint operational posture.






Wow while guess we have a lot of experience cooperating with this country. Good thing too, I think we need to get more countries around that region to cooperate. As you can see there marine corps are like ours, except smaller. There like ours in the way there a elite strike force.



posted on Aug, 2 2005 @ 09:54 AM
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Do that... And tell me when your ready...



posted on Aug, 2 2005 @ 10:14 AM
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Originally posted by Figher Master FIN
Do that... And tell me when your ready...


What are you talking about?



posted on Aug, 2 2005 @ 10:20 AM
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Originally posted by blue cell

Originally posted by Figher Master FIN
Do that... And tell me when your ready...


What are you talking about?


he means do all the militaries until there is nothing left to do.
so u have to describe the military, how many are in it, wat equipment, training, where they are based, etc.



posted on Sep, 9 2005 @ 03:28 AM
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Originally posted by deltaboy

he means do all the militaries until there is nothing left to do.
so u have to describe the military, how many are in it, wat equipment, training, where they are based, etc.


Thank you deltaboy, that was exactly what I meant...




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