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SR-71 etc & Global Warming ??

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posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 10:44 AM
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A thought occurred to me - maybe someone on here could add a scientific perspective):

Is there a link between high fast planes (Blackbird, Aurora??) which fly in the upper atmosphere and burn it as part of the propulsion process and depletion of the ozone layer / global warming?

Just that jet engine's need oxygen and ozone is O3 I believe and GW became noticed about the time the SR71 was made public.

Anyone know?




posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 10:53 AM
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While the entire airline industry has a significant impact on global warming, blaming any one aircraft or event is pointless as the amount of CO2 and other pollutants output by the SR-71 in its lifetime is dwarfed by the amount of the same pollutants output by the Shuttle in a single launch.

Also the Ozone layer is vastly higher than the SR-71 and other aircraft ever flew. Plus O3 is not the same as O2, you cant replace the one with the other.



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 12:06 PM
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From : en.wikipedia.org...

About 90% of the ozone in our atmosphere is contained in the stratosphere, the region from about 10 to 50km (32,000 to 164,000 feet) above Earth's surface. Ten percent of the ozone is contained in the troposphere, the lowest part of our atmosphere where all of our weather takes place. Ozone concentrations are greatest between about 15 and 40 km, where they range from about 2 to 8 parts per million.If all of the ozone were compressed to the pressure of the air at sea level, it would be only a few millimeters thick.

How high does SR-71 fly? around 80,000 feet?

Even if the combustion in the engine use ozone i dun not think that took out a significant amount of ozone off, compare to what CFC hav done



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 12:23 PM
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Originally posted by NotheRaGe
How high does SR-71 fly? around 80,000 feet?

Even if the combustion in the engine use ozone i dun not think that took out a significant amount of ozone off, compare to what CFC hav done

It would have as much damaging effect as a normal airliner.
Dont forget that the SR-71 hasn't flown anymore for almost decade. Other high flying aircraft, like the U-2 or the Global Hawk are much lighter, smaller and fuel efficient.

I really dont think military planes cause more damage to the ozone layer than normal aircraft, but spacecraft do damage the ozone layer a bit, or so I've heard...



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 12:51 PM
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OK Thanks as I said just my musings - as you can see I'm no expert.

A more general question then - does military activity (mainly US but others too) have disproportionate effect on the atmosphere and thus global warming?



posted on Jul, 28 2005 @ 02:38 PM
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I have heard that they are using a retired SR-71 to do scientific research on the hole in the ozone layer, being the only aircraft that can get high enough.



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