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shuttle storage

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posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 12:10 PM
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I was just wondering where NASA stores the shuttles while they are on the ground. Is it in a bunker...or a secret facility somewhere? It would be good if someone could enlighten me.




posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 12:16 PM
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I believe they have hangars for them near the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center.



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 12:20 PM
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wow..imagine seeing a bunch of shuttles lined up in a bunker..



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 12:47 PM
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There are only 3 remaining shuttles in the U.S. fleet.
The Discovery, Atlantis and Endeavor.
The Challenger was destroyed in 1986 in a launch accident.
The Columbia was destroyed during re-entry due to a damaged wing.
The Enterprise is the prototype for the shuttle fleet.

The shuttles are moved out to the launch tower on a giant mobile launch pad.
The shuttles land in California from where they are attatched to a customized 747 which flies them back to Kennedy AFB in Cape Canaveral.
Hope that helps you a little.
- Tass

[edit on 26-7-2005 by Tassadar]



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 12:57 PM
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Originally posted by Tassadar
There are only 3 remaining shuttles in the U.S. fleet.
The Discovery, Atlantis and Enterprise.
The Challenger was destroyed in 1986 in a launch accident.
The Discovery was destroyed during re-entry due to a damaged wing.
The Endeavor is the prototype for the shuttle fleet.

- Tass


You got those mixed up, Enterprise was the prototype, and Endeavor is an operational orbiter.



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 01:01 PM
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Also, the Shuttle rarely lands in California, its primary landing site is back at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, on the Shuttle Landing Facility custom built runway. Edwards in California is a backup landing site, and puts an extra $750,000 and 5 days onto the Shuttles turnaround.


M6D

posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 01:51 PM
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what happened to the enterprise?



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 02:02 PM
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Originally posted by M6D
what happened to the enterprise?


Enterprise (OV-101) was origionally created for flight testing and systems testing. Rolled out in 1976, it underwent simulated landings before being dropped from a 747 for actual in atmosphere tests. In 1978 it underwent vertical vibration testing.

From NASAs Enterprise page:



These were completed in March 1979. On April 10, 1979, the Enterprise was ferried to the Kennedy Space Center. mated with the external tank and solid rocket boosters and transported via the mobile launcher platform to Launch Complex 39-A. At Launch Complex 39-A, the Enterprise served as a practice and launch complex fit-check verification tool representing the flight vehicles.

It was ferried back to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility on Aug. 16, 1979, and then returned overland to Rockwell's Palmdale final assembly facility on Oct. 30, 1979. Certain components were refurbished for use on flight vehicles being assembled at Palmdale. The Enterprise was then returned overland to the Dryden Flight Research Facility on Sept. 6, 1981.

During May and June of 1983, Enterprise was ferried to the Paris, France, Air Show, as well as to Germany, Italy, England and Canada, and was returned to the Dryden Flight Research Facility.

In the April-October 1984 time period, Enterprise was ferried to Vandenberg Air Force Base in California and to Mobile, Ala. From there it was taken by barge to New Orleans, La., for the United States 1984 World's Fair.

In November 1984 it was ferried to Vandenberg Air Force Base and used as a practice and fit-check verification tool. On May 24, 1985, Enterprise was ferried from Vandenberg Air Force Base to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Facility.

On Sept. 20, 1985, Enterprise was ferried from Dryden Flight Research Facility to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. On Nov. 18, 1985, Enterprise was ferried from the Kennedy Space Center to Dulles Airport, Washington, D.C., and became the property of the Smithsonian Institution




posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 02:45 PM
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Tassadar
The Discovery, Atlantis and Enterprise.
The Discovery was destroyed during re-entry due to a damaged wing.
The Endeavor is the prototype for the shuttle fleet.

NO

Its Discovery, Atlantis, and Endeavor
Comumbia was destroyed in re-entry
and the Enterprise was the prototype

I'm not sure how you got your facts so wrong.



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 02:56 PM
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Richard already established that almost two hours ago.
I didn't want to waste a post saying, "oh, right".
You obviously jumped at the chance to "NO!!! You're WRONG!!!"
I made a mistake, oh no, ban me!
Chuckling,
- tass



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 03:01 PM
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Originally posted by Tassadar
Richard already established that almost two hours ago.
I didn't want to waste a post saying, "oh, right".
You obviously jumped at the chance to "NO!!! You're WRONG!!!"
I made a mistake, oh no, ban me!
Chuckling,
- tass


Nah, he was correcting ANOTHER mistake in your post, that Discovery wasnt the one that was destroyed in Feb 2003. I just corrected your Enterprise/Endeavor mistake, Mercilago was correcting the Discovery/Columbia one



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 03:08 PM
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haha, lol I didn't even notice.
Here i am saying the Discovery was destroyed 2 years ago when it's actually in space right now, haha.
I must edit that post...



posted on Jul, 26 2005 @ 08:56 PM
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It would certainly be a site to see just how they managed to bring the entire Enterprise orbiter down the streets to the Smithsonian. Is it on display?

Does anyone have pictures of how they transported the thing down the streets?


EDIT:
Thought I would answer my own question here.

In 1985, NASA transferred Enterprise to the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum where it remained in a storage hangar at Washington's Dulles International Airport. In November, 2003, Enterprise was moved to the nearby Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center where it will be on public display while it is restored.
-www.nasm.si.edu

Pic of shuttle being restored before opening of Nov. 2004.




[edit on 26-7-2005 by ben91069]



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 08:41 AM
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After the accidents and what with the requirements for ISS and the planned flights (does NASA still try to 'sell' the shuttle as a cheap way of launching satellites or make much of it's unique abilities to retreive them?) I wondered if maybe Enterprise might be rebuilt and join the remaining 'fleet'.

Mind you I did read that with advances in materials and building tech the last shuttles are very very different to the first.

Anyhoo it seems not.

The shuttles are getting old, no doubt they'll be maintained at the highest level possible and used for some time yet but you would have thought 22yrs on there'd be some serious sign of it's replacement.

.......and I can't believe we're still so dependant on 'one shot' launchers in every other program going too.


[edit on 27-7-2005 by sminkeypinkey]



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 09:07 AM
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Originally posted by sminkeypinkey

.......and I can't believe we're still so dependant on 'one shot' launchers in every other program going too.


Unfortunately, thats the side effect of one shot launchers being so damn cheap. Take for example the following:

Shuttle launch - $500million average per launch

Soyuz launch - $30 to $50 million average per launch

And then take the following into account - the Soyuz costs INCLUDE the price of the booster and vehicle, the Shuttle launch costs dont include the price of the Shuttle. US single shot boosters are jsut as cheap for unmanned missions, but none are manned rated.

If it had worked, the Shuttle should be as cheap as Soyuz is now. Whats the point of a reusable launch system that costs 10x more than a disposable one? Soyuz has proved to be more reliable than the Shuttle as well as more cost effective.



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 09:23 AM
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Does anyone know when the shuttle’s replacement will enter service? I have herd around 2010-2015 but I’m not sure.



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 09:27 AM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
Does anyone know when the shuttle’s replacement will enter service? I have herd around 2010-2015 but I’m not sure.


The Crew Exploration Vehicle is supposed to be in testing by 2008 and first manned flight by 2014. So testing in 2012 and first manned flight by 2020 then.



On January 14th 2004, President George W. Bush announced the CEV as part of the Vision for Space Exploration:

"Our second goal is to develop and test a new spacecraft, the Crew Exploration Vehicle, by 2008, and to conduct the first manned mission no later than 2014. The Crew Exploration Vehicle will be capable of ferrying astronauts and scientists to the Space Station after the shuttle is retired. But the main purpose of this spacecraft will be to carry astronauts beyond our orbit to other worlds. This will be the first spacecraft of its kind since the Apollo Command Module."



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 10:10 AM
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Originally posted by WestPoint23
Does anyone know when the shuttle’s replacement will enter service? I have herd around 2010-2015 but I’m not sure.


I read in the Telegraph (UK people!) this morning that the Shuttle project is due to end in 2010 followin which NASA will be switiching the majority of its efforts to Bush's plans for manned trips to the moons again and also to go to Mars



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