Free Masons. Good or Evil?

page: 14
2
<< 11  12  13   >>

log in

join

posted on Apr, 19 2011 @ 12:56 PM
link   
reply to post by Masonic Light
 


Perhaps I should correct my statements : my brethren stated you do not have to believe in organized religion, or any other person's religion.

Don't my own set of beliefs constitute a religion that does not have organization? You can call it personal religion? Yes I hold mainstream religions in contempt but I do not and can not hate the person for believing them. I am tolerant and curious. Just the other day I listened to a speaker who was a Wall Street businessman who converted to Catholicism who decided to abandon his decadent lifestyle. I have sat through prayers to Mecca.

I took my oath on the Bible, but not because I am Christian, but because it is an amazing book of philosophy and moral and once people read past the BS you will realize that it is one of the most important books to ever exist.

See through the bull# all Christian adherents preach, see past the things the Church preaches. There are many Christians who are told how to act all their life by adherents and the church and never pick up a Bible.

The Bible is NOT the same as the Church. GET THAT through your head. Has anyone ever read through the entire Bible, and then been to a church? BOTH preach different messages.

I don't mean to target Christianity , but I say this about all organized religion.



Then I'm curious as to why you want to become a Freemason.


Am I not already?



Every lodge is a temple of religion and its teachings are instruction in religion. - Albert Pike, Morals and Dogma, p. 213


That is Albert Pike's opinion. I have a different opinion the few times I have been to lodge.
edit on 19-4-2011 by fordrew because: (no reason given)




posted on Apr, 19 2011 @ 01:30 PM
link   

Originally posted by fordrew

Perhaps I should correct my statements : my brethren stated you do not have to believe in organized religion, or any other person's religion.


That is correct, at least in the Blue Lodges.



Yes I hold mainstream religions in contempt but I do not and can not hate the person for believing them. I am tolerant and curious.


This is where I became confused with what you said. How can one hold something in contempt, and yet be tolerant of it?

I understand that you may not agree with the principles and/or dogmas of established religion, which is not a bar to Masonic membership. But you said that held religion in contempt; since Freemasonry is primarily a religious institution, as is made very clear in the Rituals, Lectures, and Catechisms, I was wondering how you reconciled belief in the principles of Freemasonry with contempt for religion.



posted on Apr, 19 2011 @ 01:44 PM
link   
I hold them in contempt because they can't think for themselves - they are told what to do and how to do it, what stances to take on political issues, the power that is involved in these institutions. I can point out all the things wrong with these institutions and write a book with it.

Maybe I should clarify/correct myself again -- I should say that I do not hold religion so much in contempt, rather I hold the institutions that maintain and govern them in contempt. Usually when people speak about religion they include the institutions that are the church/mosque/temple/etc.
edit on 19-4-2011 by fordrew because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 19 2011 @ 03:51 PM
link   

Originally posted by fordrew
I hold them in contempt because they can't think for themselves - they are told what to do and how to do it, what stances to take on political issues, the power that is involved in these institutions. I can point out all the things wrong with these institutions and write a book with it.

Maybe I should clarify/correct myself again -- I should say that I do not hold religion so much in contempt, rather I hold the institutions that maintain and govern them in contempt. Usually when people speak about religion they include the institutions that are the church/mosque/temple/etc.

We have had prophets enough without philosophy, and philosophers without religion; the blind believers and the skeptics resemble each other, and are as far the one as the other from the eternal salvation.
Morals & Dogma, Ch. XXXII, p 844



posted on Apr, 19 2011 @ 04:00 PM
link   

Originally posted by Masonic Light
Every lodge is a temple of religion and its teachings are instruction in religion. - Albert Pike, Morals and Dogma, p. 213


The appointed action of life is the great training of Providence; and if man yields himself to it, he will need neither churches nor ordinances, except for the expression of his religious homage and gratitude.

For there is a religion of toil. It is not all drudgery, a mere stretching of the limbs and straining of the sinews to tasks. It has a meaning and an intent.

The advocate who fairly and honestly presents his case, with a feeling of true self-respect, honor, and conscience, to help the tribunal on towards the right conclusion, with a conviction that God's justice reigns there, is acting a religious part, leading that day a religious life; or else right and justice are no part of religion.

Books, to be of religious tendency in the Masonic sense, need not be books of sermons, of pious exercises, or of prayers. What-ever inculcates pure, noble, and patriotic sentiments, or touches the heart with the beauty of virtue, and the excellence of an up-right life, accords with the religion of Masonry, and is the Gospel of literature and art.

There is also a religion of society. In business, there is much more than sale, exchange, price, payment; for there is the sacred faith of man in man.

When friends meet, and hands are warmly pressed, and the eye kindles and the countenance is suffused with gladness, there is a religion between their hearts; and each loves and worships the True and Good that is in the other.

Every Masonic Lodge is a temple of religion; and its teachings are instruction in religion. For here are inculcated disinterestedness, affection, toleration, devotedness, patriotism, truth, a generous sympathy with those who suffer and mourn, pity for the fallen, mercy for the erring, relief for those in want, Faith, Hope, and Charity. Here we meet as brethren, to learn to know and love each other. Here we greet each other gladly, are lenient to each other's faults, regardful of each other's feelings, ready to relieve each other's wants. This is the true religion revealed to the ancient patriarchs; which Masonry has taught for many centuries, and which it will continue to teach as long as time endures. If unworthy passions, or selfish, bitter, or revengeful feelings, contempt, dislike, hatred, enter here, they are intruders and not welcome, strangers uninvited, and not guests.
Morals & Dogma, Ch. XIII, pp 211-214



posted on Apr, 28 2011 @ 01:51 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 





top topics
 
2
<< 11  12  13   >>

log in

join