India the next superpower?...along with others.

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posted on Jul, 21 2005 @ 03:40 AM
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talk about literacy.. India has a higher "english literate" population than china..




posted on Jul, 21 2005 @ 03:45 AM
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I don't know why all you non-resident chinese call democracy a pain in the ass when you yourselves are parasiting off it in some other country..


I found this on one of my ATS strolls... You make of it what you will..

politics.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jul, 21 2005 @ 04:32 AM
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Originally posted by Daedalus3
talk about literacy.. India has a higher "english literate" population than china..


so what does that have to do with anything.

china has a enligh speaking population of over 10million(a lot more dont know the number) more than enough for chiense requirements

and india has heaps more. but why would a worker in china need to speak english if he is not in a buiness which requires him/her to speak it?


india has a lot of english speakers because not one country speaks the same language. a hindi speaker in northern india can't understand what a hindi speaker in southern india say(something like that)

how much people going to work in call centers, IT? not many. maybe 10million



posted on Jul, 21 2005 @ 04:51 AM
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Originally posted by Daedalus3
I don't know why all you non-resident chinese call democracy a pain in the ass when you yourselves are parasiting off it in some other country..


I found this on one of my ATS strolls... You make of it what you will..


umm.... i dont see any anti-government things.

that is all the truth or were you expecting me to deny that china is one party
.

the problem is that you indians do not say anything about the state of your country but instead focus on the problem of others. eg china and pakistan.

the amount of people living under poverty line in india is larger than the pakistani population

It states chinas problems which the governemtn has been working on since 1949.

well you cant say the chinese now are as poor as what the chinese 10 or even 5 years ago.



posted on Jul, 21 2005 @ 04:53 AM
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i think their is also some diffrence in chines lauguage in chine according to area

is not



posted on Jul, 21 2005 @ 05:12 AM
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not the way you put it.

each area has a dialect. but everyone is educated in pu tong hua(which means common language)

they speak their local language at home or with their friends but nearly everyone knows how to speak pu tong hua.

in my local area there are 2 different dialects and pu tong hua.



posted on Jul, 21 2005 @ 05:15 AM
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Here is the links you asked guys :



:To begin with, China has been at true-blue capitalism, for a longer time—25 years—than India's 13. During the 13 years of India's unsteady experiments with the liberalisation process, poverty has fallen from 46% to 23%. For the last 25 years, which is an identical period of comparison, the fall has been from 55% to 23%[Reference]. These figures show that the rate of fall of poverty in India was faster paced in its open-door period, than in China.

China defines its poverty line at $76 per year, whereas India conforms to the World Bank norm of $365/year. Think that over deeply and then, evaluate India's performance. Also, for a country with an average income of $1000 a year, China's definition of its poverty line is astounding. Only less so, than world's applause for its performance.

Health of the economy: Nor is poverty definition, a rare case of China's non-conformity with accepted units of measure.Dr Subramaniam Swamy says, "... China's compliance with the UN Statistical System is partial whereas India's is total". Truth is, China's is an 'open' economy in a 'closed' society where 'facts' are opaque and answerability is non-existent.


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and chinawhite give up your flame war mentality and have a peaceful discussion around here


And cowlan, you are right a democracy appears to be slow compared to a more arbitary form of government and might get things done faster, but imo a democracy provides better long term prosects. Dont take this as offence but what will happen to China if another Tianamese like demonstrarion takes place ??...With more and more people getting economically empowered, their mental horizons will also widen and will seek more liberties. What will happen to China if another Tianamese like incident happens. ?..will the authorities do the same thing they did or will they let the protestors take control ????

The way i see it Indian systems may be slow and may not deliver overnight results as in China but ensure security in the longer run.

here is an article from the Washington post written by a neutral observer:

China may win the sprint, but India will win the marathon.

and here is another from an Indian paper (you may feel its biased, but is written by an englishwoman) >> India will be crowned Asia’s superpower



posted on Jul, 21 2005 @ 06:13 AM
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if we take chians esitamates of $76dollars only a few chinese are under the poverty line. but according to the world bank there are only 88million under the poverty line

this source is the source of your article


According to the World Bank, the number of Chinese people subsisting on less than $1 a day has fallen from 490 million in 1981 to 88 million. During this period the country's output has increased more than eightfold and the average income has risen by 7% a year, passing $1,000 (currently £551) for the first time in 2003.

www.guardian.co.uk...



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and chinawhite give up your flame war mentality and have a peaceful discussion around here


whos flamming. ?



And cowlan, you are right a democracy appears to be slow compared to a more arbitary form of government and might get things done faster, but imo a democracy provides better long term prosects.


no its not. your just saying what that guy that wrote that article says. he says if india attracts investment if india lets goes of the traiffs

here is a article you would like to read
www.thehindubusinessline.com...





[edit on 21-7-2005 by chinawhite]



posted on Jul, 21 2005 @ 06:38 AM
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here is a comparision of china V india. its un-bias. its written by a indian

www.atimes.com...


and this
www.economist.com...





[edit on 21-7-2005 by chinawhite]



posted on Jul, 21 2005 @ 11:04 AM
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Its no secret that China is ahead of India today-you know it, i know it and everyone else knows it...too bad you cant stop harping about it but what i am trying to say is that just because China is better off today, dose'nt mean its got a better long term prospectus than India.

China appears to work towards becoming a super power. But India works towards being a developed nation, not a super power. Being a super power is not in India's wish list.



posted on Jul, 22 2005 @ 01:17 AM
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china is not working towards being a superpower. only a regional power. it doesn't want to conquer far way lands. it just wants taiwan and peace to grow its economy



posted on Jul, 22 2005 @ 10:01 AM
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Originally posted by chinawhite
china is not working towards being a superpower. only a regional power. it doesn't want to conquer far way lands. it just wants taiwan and peace to grow its economy


Right, i don't think china is going to stop at taiwan, it wants more...



posted on Jul, 22 2005 @ 12:49 PM
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Why do the same 3 posters ALWAYS derail threads and start a petty little flame war? GROW UP!!!!!!!!!!


VDS

posted on Jul, 29 2005 @ 03:16 AM
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This is fron Newscientist www.newscientist.com...

"India: The next knowledge superpower

There's a revolution afoot in India. Unlike any other developing nation, India is using brainpower rather than cheap physical labour or natural resources to leapfrog into the league of technologically advanced nations. Every high tech company, from Intel to Google, is coming to India to find innovators. Leading the charge is Infosys, the country's first publicly listed billion-dollar IT company.

But the revolution is not confined to IT. Crop scientists are passionately pursuing GM crops to help feed India's poor. Some intrepid molecular biologists are pioneering stem-cell cures for blindness, while others have beaten the odds to produce vaccines for pennies.

And the country is getting wired up as never before. Mobile phone networks have nearly blanketed the country and the internet is even reaching remote villages.

Looking skyward, India's unique space programme has fought international sanctions to emerge as key player in India's development. Meanwhile, India's nuclear industry is boldly building cutting-edge fast-breeder reactors. "

From www.indiadaily.com...

India is unstoppable “heavy weight” ready to take the world by surprise. It is the military, economic and social strength that makes India the next emerging super power along with China and America. Chris Patten, the European Union Commissioner"


VDS

posted on Jul, 29 2005 @ 03:27 AM
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ANother article www.smh.com.au...

"Battle of the giants

China is touted as the next economic and military superpower, but India may yet overtake it in the new global order, reports Hamish McDonald

At present, China is racing ahead. Its economy has averaged 8 per cent plus growth for more than a decade, and hit 9.1 per cent last year when per capita income for its 1.3 billion people went over $US1000 ($1335) for the first time

Yet there are strengths in India that may make it more advanced than China later in the century. If you read the Nobel Prize-winning economist Amartya Sen, it already is more advanced - if you assume individual freedom, rule of law and democracy are goals of development. But these freedoms will help India move faster into the knowledge-based economy

Many foreign companies have been substantially Indianised, like ITC (ex-British American Tobacco) or Hindustan Lever, and Indian firms such as Tata, Reliance, Infosys, Wipro, Ranbaxy and Dr Reddy's Laboratories are reaching into global markets - and investing in China. It is hard to think of more than one or two Chinese corporate brands that register overseas.

India's big banks have emerged with bad debt ratios averaging 10 per cent, compared with the 22 per cent admitted by China's big four state banks (and believed to be closer to 50 per cent). India's stockmarkets, opened under the British in the 19th century, have been thriving since the '80s with millions of individual investors and a range of funds. China's stockmarkets are minor sources of business capital, mostly used to palm off dud public sector enterprises to domestic savers who have few alternatives

Militarily, China is ahead in its ability to deliver nuclear weapons by missile. India's army is more skilled and better led. Its air force has better training, equipment and doctrines. Its navy is building the kind of missile-destroyer China still has to import from Russia. Its electronic intelligence capability is rated by the ANU expert Desmond Ball as far ahead, and unlikely to be overtaken because of China's authoritarian culture. Its satellites are better.

Demographics may favour India's economy. Thanks to the one-child policy forced on the Han majority for near three decades, China has a rapidly ageing population whose over-60 component will rise from 10 per cent now to 30 per cent by 2050, placing a huge demand on welfare. India, which has avoided forced family planning except during Indira Gandhi's emergency rule in 1975-77, will have a much younger population for decades longer





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