From the category of WTF? Space Station Alpha caused blackout

page: 1
0
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join

posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 10:52 AM
link   
www.rumormillnews.com...

"I just spoke with someone who has a deep understanding of the New World Order and its luciferian underpinnings. This person told me that the recent blackout was created deliberately by some operation that was perpetrated from Space Station Alpha."


Oooooooooookay.




posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 10:57 AM
link   
hehe, well ive never heard of space station alpha before!



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 10:57 AM
link   
i never knew there was a Space Station Alpha



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 11:28 AM
link   
Space Station alpha refers to the current phase of construction of the International Space Station. It consists of the Russian Service Module and the US Lab, along with any appendages they have stuck on lately.



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 11:29 AM
link   

Originally posted by Valhall
Space Station alpha refers to the current phase of construction of the International Space Station. It consists of the Russian Service Module and the US Lab, along with any appendages they have stuck on lately.



thanx for clearing that up Valhall



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 12:54 PM
link   
No problem, but I do need to correct what I said.

alpha Station consists of the Russian Service Module, the Unity Module (also called Node 1) and the US Lab.

Unity isn't anything but what it implies...a node. Like one of those omni-directional linky thingies in a kid's construction kit. It also has a docking port.

It looks as though they have quite a bit done on the appendages! Two of the SAWs are connected (the Z1 truss), PMA-3 and the platform. They are coming right along!





posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 01:41 PM
link   
Thank you again Valhall for explaining it



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 01:43 PM
link   
indeed, thanks for clearing it up..



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 02:01 PM
link   
I bet there going to make it some kind of weapon. Like have a laser cannon or particle cannon of some kind on it and have it gather energy from the powerplants somehow and wham, bye bye anything that stands in its way.



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 03:28 PM
link   
There were reports that the Columbia mission actually had a military purpose. Anybody know what they supposedly installed during the Columbia mission? Just curious.



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 03:48 PM
link   
Columbia did not visit the station, and there was no installation.

Columbia could not visit the station. It didn't not have a docking port for docking with the station. Also, Columbia, being the oldest of the fleet was a lot heavier than the other shuttles.

Columbia's mission was dedicated to scientific research.



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 05:34 PM
link   
Everything val says about Columbia is correct...

Columbia (OV-101) was overbuilt. It was structurally different than Atlantis, Discovery, and Endeavour. Columbia belongs more along a 'development curve' that includes Enterprise (OV-100), and Challenger (OV-99). Originally, Enterprise was to be the first shuttle, but was found to be too heavy and so was relegated to atmospheric tests. The bare frame that would become Challenger, which was built for vibrational testing, was then modified to fill-out the shuttle fleet. With Atlantis and Discovery, NASA had, more or less, its first 'production block' of standardised shuttles. After the loss of Challenger, Endeavour was assembled from spare parts and static test components along the specs of Atlantis and Discovery.

Columbia, like val said, had no docking capability at the time of the disaster.

The ISS, though, has not received any new modules in months, since before the Columbia accident. Its construction, therefore, is seriously behind schedule.



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 05:40 PM
link   

Originally posted by Valhall
Also, Columbia, being the oldest of the fleet was a lot heavier than the other shuttles.


Not to be an arse, but weight means nothing in space.



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 05:44 PM
link   
www.heavens-above.com...

The chart on this page shows the height of the ISS over time. As you know, the ISS relies on the regular visits of the shuttle to stay aloft. The shuttle gives it a boost upwards every time it visits, and delivers sime fresh fuel for the thrusters.

If ths ISS is military, then I would think that they will be pushing for fresh trips to space, as it's going to reenter the atmosphere in 4 months if there's no fuel and boost delivery.

Just thinking out loud.



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 05:45 PM
link   
MASS means a GREAT DEAL when putting an object in space. The more massive something is, the more energy is required to put it in higher orbits. Columbia's overall mass, during the mission in question, meant that it could not boost up into the orbit of the ISS (also known as 'alpha').



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 05:47 PM
link   
Yeah, Zzub,

Though many military stations have been proposed (and some operated by the Soviet Union) the ISS seems entirely civilian. The USAF might have a station of their own... but it would undoubtedly be serviced by their own space fleet (that is, a program called 'BlackHorse', I believe).



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 05:53 PM
link   
Hmm, never heard of BlackHorse. Got any links?
(I know, I'm lazy
)



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 05:59 PM
link   

Originally posted by onlyinmydreams
Yeah, Zzub,

Though many military stations have been proposed (and some operated by the Soviet Union) the ISS seems entirely civilian. The USAF might have a station of their own... but it would undoubtedly be serviced by their own space fleet (that is, a program called 'BlackHorse', I believe).


Blackhorse is the launch system that they have propopsed, I believe.



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 07:05 PM
link   

Originally posted by Satyr

Originally posted by Valhall
Also, Columbia, being the oldest of the fleet was a lot heavier than the other shuttles.


Not to be an arse, but weight means nothing in space.


Satyr,

Nor am I about to mean to be an arse.

Yes it does.

The station is in LEO (Low Earth Orbit) it has to contend with both gravity effects and aerodynamic drag. That's why it has to be reboosted every once in awhile, or it will fall on your head. It also flies a TEA (torque equivalent attitude) in order to "even out" the effects of these two forces in a complete orbit. This minimizes the torque that must be absorbed by the CMGs (control moment gyros) and minimizes the number of near-saturation points for the CMGs as well as the number of momentum dumps that must be performed.

The station does have torque on it, and that torque increases and changes when a shuttle is docked to it.

Hope that clears things up.

[Edited on 22-8-2003 by Valhall]



posted on Aug, 21 2003 @ 07:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by Zzub

Originally posted by onlyinmydreams
Yeah, Zzub,

Though many military stations have been proposed (and some operated by the Soviet Union) the ISS seems entirely civilian. The USAF might have a station of their own... but it would undoubtedly be serviced by their own space fleet (that is, a program called 'BlackHorse', I believe).


Blackhorse is the launch system that they have propopsed, I believe.




The ISS is entirely civilian. The DOD has no station to my knowledge, and that would be a fairly hard thing to hide.





new topics
top topics
 
0
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join