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Earth Core Heatsink Power Plant

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posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 02:51 PM
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In several of Issac Asimov's science fiction books he refers to a "heatsink" that would be dug in any planet, and would provide power for the whole planet. By digging to the part of that planet close to where the magma begins, the temperature becomes VERY high ( 1 degree F. per 60 ft) So Why havent we tried it yet? it wouldnt have ANY pollution whatsoever, and it would provide MASSIVE amounts of energy. The only issues i see are A.) Temperatures and possible eruptions of lava and B.) a huge engineering feat




posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 02:59 PM
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Don't forget that if you continuously remove energy from the system, the system will fall into entropy.

Might not happen right away, but after a few hundred or a few thousand years, the heat would all have been used up, and we'd be floating on a cold ball of rock and ice. Not very pleasant.

The system works relatively efficiently, and should maintain heat and motion for many, many millenia to come. However, if we start messing with it and syphon a great deal of energy out of the core, we'll end up shooting ourselves in the foot.

No?



posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 03:04 PM
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You mean Geothermo electricity?
Some electric generating plants are already using this (to an extent).
They started in Greenland I believe, but Pacific Gas & Electric use it.
About Geothermo Electric Plants

These plants though do not technically tap directly to the core but use geothermal vents to run their turbines.
Recently there was a Japanese group that was (again) in the final stages of building a machine to go down close to the edge of the mantle but it still would not be near the actual core.



posted on Jul, 19 2005 @ 12:35 AM
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I dont think a single little heatsink into the molten rock of earth would siphon off that much energy, think about all of the volcanoes that erupt daily and the earth isnt cooling off or anything. To the other question about Geothermic vents- same energy source but different idea- this time a massive hole is dug CLOSE TO the molten mantle.



posted on Jul, 19 2005 @ 05:04 PM
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I have always liked this idea and wondered why there has not been further development. Seemed to me to be a very safe form of renewable energy.

Perhaps the costs involved are too vast, any have any facts 'n' figures?



posted on Jul, 19 2005 @ 05:56 PM
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Yea that and the extreem pressure of the ocean depths is another source of untapped eneregy potential.

Its all about money.. they cannot make money with free energy.

Sad. Can only hope the pharmaceutical industry is not holding back cures because of the same thing.. money.


I had to post something today =).

X



posted on Jul, 19 2005 @ 06:32 PM
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yea i cant figure out why anyone hasnt tried it yet, maybe bc it would be hard to do, but think of like the Chunnel (tunnel bt UK and France) and how intricate and massive that was- surely it can be done.


apc

posted on Jul, 19 2005 @ 08:10 PM
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Originally posted by kenshiro2012
Recently there was a Japanese group that was (again) in the final stages of building a machine to go down close to the edge of the mantle...

This is basically the reason it hasn't been done... noone's gotten there yet.
However, it would be simple enough to draw heat from active lava flows already penetrating the surface. Just have to keep the equipment from melting.. and the ground from collapsing.. and the pressure from rising and blowing everything up.. etc etc.

A few investors and some good ideas would go a long way in proving the concept in the meantime.

But a tap through the crust into the upper mantle? Drawing heat out would pose no risk to the future of the planet, as long as pressure were maintained.
Volcanoes are the planet stabilizing internal pressures. The heat is a result of this pressure. If there were a constant (and miniscule in comparison) drain on the heat, I would think all we could expect would be a decrease in volcanic activitiy localized around the drill site, but the rest of the world wouldn't even notice.



posted on Jul, 20 2005 @ 12:45 AM
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MAn i would love to have some engineers look at this problem. I think i am going to e-mail a few in the next couple of days to see what they would think of such a project (i just hope they dont get caught up in the enormous scale of the project, and just focus on the main issues in dealing with the heat, depth, etc.)



posted on Jul, 20 2005 @ 08:14 AM
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Originally posted by horten229v3
MAn i would love to have some engineers look at this problem. I think i am going to e-mail a few in the next couple of days to see what they would think of such a project (i just hope they dont get caught up in the enormous scale of the project, and just focus on the main issues in dealing with the heat, depth, etc.)

As folks have pointed out, it's being done... it's geothermal energy. It's far more efficient to let the Earth provide the tunnel through the mantle than it is to try and drill through it.

So far, we haven't been able to technologically overcome the problems to go down far enough to drill our own geothermal sources. It's theoretically possible in the future, however.

Wryde, the Earth is not a closed system and you'd need an awfully long time to cool down the core. The tiny holes for geothermal energy would not have a measurable impact on the Earth.


Its all about money.. they cannot make money with free energy.

Sure they can. It's not something that you can do by walking out in your back yard and sinking a very very deep hole (it's incredibly expensive to drill down even a few hundred feet... renting the equipment and trying to find space for it in the back yard and hiring the drilling crews.) If anything, they could make GREATER profits by using this kind of energy.



posted on Jul, 20 2005 @ 10:55 AM
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Is the idea of a laser-based drill possible. If the laser was hot enough it could vaporize the rock and earth so it wouldn't be necessasy the extract it from the hole. At that temp it would possibly even leave a nice smooth glass/metal-lined hole (depending on the material you were drilling through). Seems the power demands would really ramp up when you started getting really deep though. What do you guys think?

Found this link about laser drills.



posted on Jul, 22 2005 @ 12:17 AM
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i think that a laser cutter would work too, whatever the equipment, it would be a massive project.



posted on Jul, 22 2005 @ 06:51 AM
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Originally posted by yadboy
Is the idea of a laser-based drill possible.

www.space.com...

It seems to consume a hell of a lot more power as it breaks a lot more chemical bonds. So it seems possible, just not efficient.



posted on Jul, 22 2005 @ 07:46 AM
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Eh, I'm a bit skeptical of laser drills and so forth. For one thing, where's all the stuff inside the hole going to end up...the atmosphere? Now we'll have tons of silica to breathe?

Not good.



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 12:01 AM
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Well when people burn campfires you dont worry about "breathing in tons of burnt wood do you? Also there wouldnt be a large amount of these being built, maybe a couple.



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 12:08 AM
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Iceland has tons of geothermal energy utilization. I have heard that it is their #1 source of energy in the country. Of course, they have the advantage of geography for the use of geothermal energy, so it is only natural that they use it. It's a totally reasonable and useful source of energy, but I don't see it solving the world's energy problems. Geothermal would help with the burden, though, and for that reason it should be pursued, where geographically viable.



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 02:49 AM
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Um lets see so building a MASSIVE heatsink, with no fossil fuel pollutants, will not solve the world's energy problemS?! Of course it will, on the right scale that is.



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 03:46 AM
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Originally posted by horten229v3
Um lets see so building a MASSIVE heatsink, with no fossil fuel pollutants, will not solve the world's energy problemS?! Of course it will, on the right scale that is.


IF you could harness enough geothermal energy, then yes, but I seriously doubt you could achieve enough energy to replace all of our fossil fuels. We could certainly help the energy problem, but I don't think this is going to cure it, unless geothermal energy produces a LOT more energy than I'm thinking of, and we can build a lot more geothermal stations than I think we could.



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 12:07 PM
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Im just thinking that even if we have to build a massive one, or many of them it would be the perfect solution to our problems and i believe that it could provide enough power also.



posted on Jul, 27 2005 @ 04:19 PM
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Originally posted by horten229v3
Im just thinking that even if we have to build a massive one, or many of them it would be the perfect solution to our problems and i believe that it could provide enough power also.


Well, I certainly HOPE that we could fulfill our energy requirements with geothermal energy. I think that we should certainly try to do so. At worst, we will slow down our fossil fuel consumption. At best, we will eliminate it, and have abundant energy for a very long time. Either way, everyone wins. The more geothermal plants the better, I say.



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