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Fight or fight the draft???

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posted on Jul, 14 2005 @ 05:46 PM
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If the draft were reinstated, would you do your duty and fight the war as a U.S. citizen, or would you fight the draft? (not saying that the draft will be, but if it was)




posted on Jul, 14 2005 @ 06:27 PM
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That is a question anyone here between the ages of 18 and 35 should seriously ponder.

The odds of you having to serve are growing by the day.

As for myself, I've already done my time in. If I truly believed in the cause, I would go back in. Without question.



posted on Jul, 14 2005 @ 08:53 PM
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If the draft were reinstated I would fully support it and do my duty to America. However I won't have to worry about draft because I'm joining voluntarily before they have a chance to draft me.



posted on Jul, 14 2005 @ 09:25 PM
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Same hear, so long as theres no draft within the next few years I'll voluntarily joining one of the branches (probably AF but not sure). But let's say theres a draft tommorow. It depends, are we invading Mexico because they're going communist, or are the Chinese at our doorstep with deadly intentions? If it's like the latter I'll join no questions asked. But if it's something like the former, well I'll make my next post from Canada.



posted on Jul, 14 2005 @ 10:39 PM
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Originally posted by cyberdude78
Same hear, so long as theres no draft within the next few years I'll voluntarily joining one of the branches (probably AF but not sure). But let's say theres a draft tommorow. It depends, are we invading Mexico because they're going communist, or are the Chinese at our doorstep with deadly intentions? If it's like the latter I'll join no questions asked. But if it's something like the former, well I'll make my next post from Canada.


My first time around it was no questions asked. If I ever went back I'd really have to believe in the cause.

If you're joining the Air Force, I would let them know ASAP. When I got out there was over a year-long waiting list to get in. 'Course that was '92. They've been meeting their quotas, so I would proceed accordingly. The Marines is always an option, tho.



posted on Jul, 14 2005 @ 10:59 PM
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I would do it. My father was in the Air force for 23 years, and my grandfather served two tours in Vietnam. When I took the asvab test in high scholl, my score was 96, and the marines told me that I could pretty much take any job that I wanted, if not get any post. After a year and a half the recruiter sending mail, calling, even coming to my job, they gave up. Sometimes I want to kick my own butt for not serving. If need be though, I would do it with no questions asked. While people in some countries cower in a shelter from the sound of explosions, we are sitting at home watching a DVD, or shopping for some useless item. As much of a horrible police state that most of this country is in, we can still pretty much do as we please within the lines of the law without fear or persecution. (or some things outside of the law at times) While others have lived with the fear of being punished for even enjoying music, we get to download and listen to whatever we want. While other shelter women behind shrouds, we can see whatever we want. In some places, you can be imprisoned for speaking against the "system", but we have documentaries that slap the gov't. Some people are worried if their children will make it to school without being hit by a stray bullet, but we can walk freely in a mall, on a cel-phone about nothing critical. I would serve to help maintain, or spread these freedoms and I would die to protect our freedom that we take for granted every day. If the people of this country were so submissive, we would never be able to do the things that we do. (as trivial as they can be)



posted on Jul, 14 2005 @ 11:08 PM
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Here's something for you to consider. Those recruiters lied to you. Scoring a 90-something on the ASVAB will not get you any job you want. Your choices, at that level are limited but not so bad. It means you scored into the BRAVO category.

In order to be an officer or anything of technical proficiency, you must score a 110 or better on the ASVAB. Anyone thinking about going in should definitely study that test and do their best to go over 110. If you want choices, civilian possibilities and a decent experience, score up.

[edit on 7/14/05 by EastCoastKid]



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 02:15 AM
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Originally posted by EastCoastKid
That is a question anyone here between the ages of 18 and 35 should seriously ponder.


No. It's beyond pondering. Do something about it.



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 08:02 AM
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Originally posted by EastCoastKid
Here's something for you to consider. Those recruiters lied to you. Scoring a 90-something on the ASVAB will not get you any job you want. Your choices, at that level are limited but not so bad. It means you scored into the BRAVO category............

[edit on 7/14/05 by EastCoastKid]


Thats the job of the recruiter though. They have to tell little lies and make you feel god so they look good and you join. Then you join and you'll go through all this paperwork and then they will probably say that they don't need anyone in the job you wanted and they will put you somewhere else that they say is close but isn't even.



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 09:02 AM
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I can only answer this as a hypothetical...being female and 31, and all that. Oh..and I'm a non-citizen (but legal resident).

I'd sign up for National Service IF it include an option for "other non-military community-based service", or similar.

In other words - no, I wouldn't fight.



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 09:36 AM
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I'm in the same vein as cyberdude. If there's another Hitler getting ready to try and take over the world, I'm there. If there's troops gathering at our border trying to invade, hell, I might not even sign up but just find a good gun and do what I can to thin their ranks before I'm taken out.

If it's a political action, a fight for oil, or we're just "spreading democracy," then I'll gladly serve my tour in Canada. Besides, it's only a few hours drive anyways, and I've been wanting to visit for a while.

I have no problems serving my country as long as it's something my country truly needs. I don't see Iraq as any kind of national, let alone global, threat, and I never have. Same with North Korea at the moment, although that may change on any given day. But just trying to force another nation to live like we do isn't something I feel we--or at least I--should be involved in.



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 09:54 AM
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Mcory1, perhaps the difficulty here is that as a member of the forces (drafted or otherwise), you don't get to choose who you do or don't want to fight against.

With that in mind...would you enlist? Would you support a draft?



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 07:39 PM
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Originally posted by EastCoastKid
The Marines is always an option, tho.


Although, those who choose the Marine Corps will undoubtedly come to question their judgement and sanity before they finish training and even later if they find themselves in combat, those who survive and do the best they can with their lot, will find that their choice becomes more valuable as time goes by. To have become a Marine is a lifetime benefit and an obligation. To carry the title Marine and to have earned the right to display the Eagle, Globe and Anchor, rather than just displaying it because it looks cool, means that you can always depend on your fellow Marines and that you will always be there for them. That Brotherhood spans all MOSs, conflicts, wars, and generations. It's hard to put a price on that.

[edit on 2005/7/15 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 08:03 PM
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Originally posted by Tinkleflower
Mcory1, perhaps the difficulty here is that as a member of the forces (drafted or otherwise), you don't get to choose who you do or don't want to fight against.

With that in mind...would you enlist? Would you support a draft?



I realize that, and I'm making my statement on the assumption that we all know what's going on before the draft is started. I mean, it's not going to spring up with no warning whatsoever, and without any type of war scenario happening. We'd know well in advance of the draft being reinstated, and we'd also know who we'd be fighting against. I have no plans of voluntarily enlisting. While military service could well benefit me (discipline is not one of my strong points), I have no reason to join at this moment. I'm in a stable job with great future potential, and although I'm not able to go to school at the moment, I'm not in any hurry to get my degree just yet.

Keeping that in mind, if I had been around in WWII (and somehow knowing how big of a deal it was as I do now) I would have been at the recruiter's office before the last bomb dropped on Pearl. At that point in time, I would've completely supported a draft, and eventhough I probably would've ended up being one of the biggest pansies on the battlefield I would've given everything I could.

Had I been around during Vietnam, I would not have supported the draft. Ho Chih Minh was in no way going to take over the world, and from what I've read he was merely trying to establish North Vietnam's soveriegnty. It was a political action merely attempting to keep communism from spreading, and I don't feel that we should really care that much how other nations run themselves.

If the draft were reinstated right now for Iraq, I would serve my tour in Canada without any hesitation. I have no problems admitting that, and I don't feel I'm less of an American for saying that. In no way do I think we have had any honest reason to be over there. While I am a firm believer in serving my country, I don't believe that the reasons for invading Iraq are strong enough to lose our own countrymen/women. An instance like this I feel that the country as a whole would be better served by people demanding to do what is necessary to stablize the area and get our meddling noses out of their business.

I know there's probably a lot of members here who will take this as unpatriotic, and that's your perogative. I won't argue with that, although I don't feel it is. In my book, patriotism is doing what you feel is best for your country, and not following orders blindly. I mean no disrespect to those who have served in the military, and to those who have died in that service. But I don't see any threats to the American Way that I was brought up on, so I see no reason to go out and kill or get killed. That's my perogative.



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 08:29 PM
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Originally posted by MCory1
If the draft were reinstated right now for Iraq, I would serve my tour in Canada without any hesitation. I have no problems admitting that, and I don't feel I'm less of an American for saying that.


You're right. You would be no less an American. You are not an American, at all. You might be a citizen of the US and a beneficiary of all the rights and privileges thereunto appertaining, but you're no American.



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 09:14 PM
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Originally posted by Tinkleflower
Mcory1, perhaps the difficulty here is that as a member of the forces (drafted or otherwise), you don't get to choose who you do or don't want to fight against.

With that in mind...would you enlist? Would you support a draft?



This is the question. Would you, if you were blinde? I did. And I was 19 and very idealistic. So, on me, they got a pass. Now is a much different story. I'm not killing anyone just 'cos Uncle Sam tells me I should. FT! I'm just glad I didn't know then what I know now. And I'm glad it turned out the way it did.



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 09:20 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott
You're right. You would be no less an American. You are not an American, at all. You might be a citizen of the US and a beneficiary of all the rights and privileges thereunto appertaining, but you're no American.


In your mind, Grady. And that's important to differentiate. I mean no offense to you, but they spoke their mind, and as an American, they have a right to their opinion, whether you & I like it or not. It carries no more weight than yours or mine. God Bless the USA.



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 09:25 PM
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There is a quality attached to the name American that is not attached to the condition of being a citizen. Those who would refuse the call of their nation in dire times do not, by definition, possess the requisite character. McCory1 should leave now and avoid the rush. He'll be happier, anyway.



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 09:33 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott
There is a quality attached to the name American that is not attached to the condition of being a citizen. Those who would refuse the call of their nation in dire times do not, by definition, possess the requisite character. McCory1 should leave now and avoid the rush. He'll be happier, anyway.


Fighting is not a prerequisite for being an "American." Are the Quakers any less American b/c they refuse to take up arms against a neighbor. Their choice is to turn the other cheek. Is that not Jesus' command?

No one on this thread would sit idly by while their country (our country) was being threatened. The difference here is, we all see untruths. No one in their right mind is gonna offer up their flesh for a bogus operation or a terrible mistake of an operation. They're smarter than that. (Thanx to the internet unlike any generation before it.)



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 09:48 PM
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Originally posted by MCory1
...[I]f I had been around in WWII (and somehow knowing how big of a deal it was as I do now) I would have been at the recruiter's office before the last bomb dropped on Pearl. At that point in time, I would've completely supported a draft, and even though I probably would've ended up being one of the biggest pansies on the battlefield I would've given everything I could.



If McCory1 were to seek conscientious objector status, which is his privilege, and if he were to answer all questions honestly, the above statement would disqualify his claim of conscientious objection.

One does not have the luxury of selective objection.

Based upon McCory1's knowledge of the war in Vietnam, I would suspect that he doesn't have sufficient understanding of the war on terror to pass judgement on its validity. He would do well to think long and hard about the benefits of his citizenship and what he believes those benefits are worth. He might also consider all those who have laid down their lives all around the world and in countless conflicts to further the cause of liberty that he so cavalierly exercises.





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