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The 'Rambling Roadtrip' Conspiracy

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posted on Jul, 12 2005 @ 11:37 AM
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Is anyone else aware of this program and does anyone else have the same misgivings about it that I do?

Certain churches are putting on a summer program for kids that takes them on a 'Rambling Roadtrip', a virtual tour that begins at their destination, Washington, D.C., and traces back across the country to their church. Last night they were in Chicago, tonight they go to Yellowstone, or something like that. It started Sunday and runs through Thursday.

My concern is this: On the surface it seems innocuous enough, but underneath the 'Rambling Roadtrip' seems to be preparing them to take a real roadtrip, conditioning them to go along quietly on a possible relocation expedition.

I know its paranoid, but my son is involved, and I have strong misgivings about him being conditioned to make the 'right turns' on the 'obey highway' as they put it. It is all integrated into a program called Vacation Bible Study, or VBS. I'm sorry, but I don't like it.

Rambling Roadtrip




posted on Jul, 12 2005 @ 07:20 PM
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If you're not allowed to know what's going on, then I think it's time to worry. Get to know the staff. Who's running the show? What are the 'road rules'? How many people are with how many kids at a time. What's the agenda? Does your son have a cell phone? Has your son been educated on what to do in odd situations? Q & A the thing until there is no conspiracy. Just some advice, I don't know since I'd not heard of it until now, but remember:





[edit on 12-7-2005 by saint4God]



posted on Jul, 13 2005 @ 11:02 AM
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Thank you for the great advice.

I have volunteered at my son's school and I do know his friends, other parents, and the Pastor of the church. I still have an uneasy feeling about the program. My ex has been taking my son to the event the past three evenings, and everything is cool so far. Tomorrow is family night and I plan to attend. It is what the program is preparing the kids for that concerns me. Not so much the surface content, but the future intent.

Thanks again for responding, saint4God.



posted on Jul, 13 2005 @ 12:56 PM
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Originally posted by Icarus Rising
Thank you for the great advice.

I have volunteered at my son's school and I do know his friends, other parents, and the Pastor of the church. I still have an uneasy feeling about the program. My ex has been taking my son to the event the past three evenings, and everything is cool so far. Tomorrow is family night and I plan to attend. It is what the program is preparing the kids for that concerns me. Not so much the surface content, but the future intent.

Thanks again for responding, saint4God.


Sounds like you're doing quite a bit on your end then
. What is the program preparing the kids for?

Three general pieces of advice if your interested:

1.) "God grant me the serenity
to accept the things I cannot change;
courage to change the things I can;
and wisdom to know the difference." - The Serenity Prayer

2.)"Trust in the LORD with all your heart
and lean not on your own understanding;
in all your ways acknowledge him,
and he will direct your paths." - Proverbs 3, 5-6

3.) Pray.

May love, faith, and hope be with you always,
God bless.



posted on Jul, 13 2005 @ 05:07 PM
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saint4God,

You are truly wonderful and inspiring. I shall fear not.

"For it is in being uncertain and not in control that we find true faith, in knowing the limits of mind and body that we find wholeness of spirit" - from the Healing Prayer

and also with you.



posted on Jul, 14 2005 @ 02:41 PM
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Originally posted by Icarus Rising
saint4God,

You are truly wonderful and inspiring. I shall fear not.


Thank you, even though it's a misdirected compliment. As Sgt. Friday would say from Dragnet, "Just doing my job".




Originally posted by Icarus Rising
"For it is in being uncertain and not in control that we find true faith, in knowing the limits of mind and body that we find wholeness of spirit" - from the Healing Prayer

and also with you.


^_^. I think that captures the heart of faith.

[edit on 14-7-2005 by saint4God]

[edit on 14-7-2005 by saint4God]



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 01:21 PM
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If you don't want your son to be a part of this, then why don't you put your foot down and say no? Get your son to join Indian Guides. It's kinda like boy scouts except its a lot cooler, and it's just boys and their dads all the time. So you're never sending your kid away with some strange man or anything. I was in it for several years with my father and had a great time. There's really no religion or cult-like stuff involved. It's just fathers and sons, and it builds a very strong bond between them.

Good luck battling with your ex! lol



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 02:57 PM
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Originally posted by Rasputin13
If you don't want your son to be a part of this, then why don't you put your foot down and say no? Get your son to join Indian Guides. It's kinda like boy scouts except its a lot cooler, and it's just boys and their dads all the time. So you're never sending your kid away with some strange man or anything. I was in it for several years with my father and had a great time. There's really no religion or cult-like stuff involved. It's just fathers and sons, and it builds a very strong bond between them.

Good luck battling with your ex! lol


Hey that's a great idea, instead of learning more about it, yank him away and join some secular organization like the boy scouts (who we all know are free of any inappropriate adult-child relationships)
. I was in boy scouts for 2 years, and only did 2 activities that encouraged the involvement of my father. Both were weekend camping trip, as opposed to the week long trips that had 'counsellors'. Did I mention I got lost for a day and had to find my own way back? I seem to be doing a lot of solo door-to-door sales as well to fund these outtings. I hope that practice has changed. You say Indian Guides is different and father and son all the time, I certainly hope so and would not compare it to boy scouts in any way in that case.

Oh, and careful putting your foot down on a child's interest (especially when it's spiritually enriching and fun) because a lot of therapy starts with "When I was a child, my father never let me..." usually followed with "I was never trusted..." "He wouldn't listen or try to see things my way..." No kid I've ever met complained that their parents asked too many questions or was too interested in what they were doing.


[edit on 15-7-2005 by saint4God]



posted on Jul, 15 2005 @ 03:38 PM
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Originally posted by saint4God

Originally posted by Rasputin13
If you don't want your son to be a part of this, then why don't you put your foot down and say no? Get your son to join Indian Guides. It's kinda like boy scouts except its a lot cooler, and it's just boys and their dads all the time. So you're never sending your kid away with some strange man or anything. I was in it for several years with my father and had a great time. There's really no religion or cult-like stuff involved. It's just fathers and sons, and it builds a very strong bond between them.

Good luck battling with your ex! lol


Hey that's a great idea, instead of learning more about it, yank him away and join some secular organization like the boy scouts (who we all know are free of any inappropriate adult-child relationships)
. I was in boy scouts for 2 years, and only did 2 activities that encouraged the involvement of my father. Both were weekend camping trip, as opposed to the week long trips that had 'counsellors'. Did I mention I got lost for a day and had to find my own way back? I seem to be doing a lot of solo door-to-door sales as well to fund these outtings. I hope that practice has changed. You say Indian Guides is different and father and son all the time, I certainly hope so and would not compare it to boy scouts in any way in that case.

Oh, and careful putting your foot down on a child's interest (especially when it's spiritually enriching and fun) because a lot of therapy starts with "When I was a child, my father never let me..." usually followed with "I was never trusted..." "He wouldn't listen or try to see things my way..." No kid I've ever met complained that their parents asked too many questions or was too interested in what they were doing.


[edit on 15-7-2005 by saint4God]


I shouldn't have compared Indian Guides to Boy Scouts. The only likeness between the two is that they're both groups for boys, and they take part in activities. Indian Guides is 100% father and son activities. That's the whole idea behind it. Their sister group, Indian Princesses, is a Father-Daughter group that is very similar. I was in Boy Scouts for a few weeks, and except for our paintball trip, it sucked! Indian Guides was one of the best things I've ever been a part of. I will certainly join with my sons if it's still around then.

As for Dad pulling his son out of this religous thing... If he has legitimate concerns about it, and doesn't like the idea of his son going on a road trip with adult men whom he doesn't even know, then he has every right to object to it. I really doubt too many people have ever complained in therapy that their parents didn't let them take part in their church group! It's more like "Dad didn't let me play football. Dad didn't let me out past 10. Dad took my dime bag." etc, etc. While children should have some say in the things they take part in, their parents are ultimately responsible. There are TONS of other groups that his kids can join that are extremely fun, educational and enlightening. And they don't involve shipping them off with a bunch of strange men!



posted on Jul, 16 2005 @ 06:49 PM
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Originally posted by Rasputin13
I shouldn't have compared Indian Guides to Boy Scouts. The only likeness between the two is that they're both groups for boys, and they take part in activities. Indian Guides is 100% father and son activities. That's the whole idea behind it. Their sister group, Indian Princesses, is a Father-Daughter group that is very similar. I was in Boy Scouts for a few weeks, and except for our paintball trip, it sucked! Indian Guides was one of the best things I've ever been a part of. I will certainly join with my sons if it's still around then.


Sounds like a greatly improved organization. It does sound like several heights above the organization I'd belonged to. Apologies for my embitterment towards Boy Scouts, but those were my experiences. I'm sure there are those who would say otherwise.



Originally posted by Rasputin13
As for Dad pulling his son out of this religous thing... If he has legitimate concerns about it, and doesn't like the idea of his son going on a road trip with adult men whom he doesn't even know, then he has every right to object to it. I really doubt too many people have ever complained in therapy that their parents didn't let them take part in their church group! It's more like "Dad didn't let me play football. Dad didn't let me out past 10. Dad took my dime bag." etc, etc. While children should have some say in the things they take part in, their parents are ultimately responsible. There are TONS of other groups that his kids can join that are extremely fun, educational and enlightening. And they don't involve shipping them off with a bunch of strange men!


I agree they shouldn't be shipped off with strange men...I just think that if they are 'strange' men, then the parents have a responsibility to 'unstrange' them before passing judgement, squashing the activity and insisting on their own program. To do so is ignorance, which is the exact thing we're here to deny
. Love and protect your kids, but also learn and understand them too.

Maybe his son can join both. A program he likes and a program his son likes. One for father son time, one for spiritual fellowship and growth.

Reading back through my post, I didn't appreciate my own sarcasm, so apologies also if any offense was taken from it.



posted on Jul, 16 2005 @ 07:53 PM
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Thanks for the constructive advice.



'Rambling Roadtrip', a virtual tour that begins at their destination, Washington, D.C., and traces back across the country to their church.


Virtual tour. This thing ends where it begins, and begins where it ends. They backtrack across country from D.C. to Knott's Berry through Chicago, Kansas and Yellowstone. Interesting route. the program consists of simulated bus riding (my son developed a fascination with RV's), simulated camping skills, lots of learning spiritual songs (complete with hand and arm gesture routines), and plenty of exercise and sweets. What bothers me about it ?



Not so much the surface content, but the future intent.


What are they trying to prepare these kids for?



On the surface it seems innocuous enough, but underneath the 'Rambling Roadtrip' seems to be preparing them to take a real roadtrip, conditioning them to go along quietly on a possible relocation expedition.


I get the feeling there is more to this program than meets the eye. As has been pointed out, my ex is the one who took him to this program, and there are some accomodations that must be made in the interests of my son. If they all of a sudden start loading buses and heading out for Yellowstone, you can be assured I won't be going along, and if I have anything to say about it, neither will my son.



I know its paranoid, but my son is involved, and I have strong misgivings about him being conditioned to make the 'right turns' on the 'obey highway' as they put it. It is all integrated into a program called Vacation Bible Study, or VBS. I'm sorry, but I don't like it.



posted on Jul, 16 2005 @ 07:57 PM
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Incidentally, my brother put his two boys through Indian Scouts. They had a lot of fun, and it is a good suggestion for something to look into as an alternative to AWANA.

Thanks again for the good advice.



posted on Jul, 17 2005 @ 12:36 PM
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My kids went to a VBS that did the rambling road trip. A bunch of my friends took their kids(a very very large baptist church) and I think the program was fine. I don't think there was an ulterior motive any further than maybe more membership for the church. Heck, there were over 3 THOUSAND kids at that VBS.

They did their other VBS at our church and honestly, I liked the feel of it more. Maybe because it is my church. My kids also told me they enjoyed it more. Their theme was "the circle G ranch"

I wouldn't worry too much about it. Kids forget so quickly anyhow.



posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 09:03 AM
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You are right. There are a bunch of people making the 'right turns' on the 'obey highway'. I'm sure you feel more comfortable at your own church. The program is a lot of fun for the kids, and superficially harmless. Again, you are right that it has some characteristics of a membership drive, as well.

My son, however, has an excellent memory, and forgets very little quickly. He could listen a little better to me at times, but his memory is great.



posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 09:19 AM
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Originally posted by Icarus Rising
My concern is this: On the surface it seems innocuous enough, but underneath the 'Rambling Roadtrip' seems to be preparing them to take a real roadtrip, conditioning them to go along quietly on a possible relocation expedition.


Your concerns are valid. That exodus and rapture nonsense is all the rage now. Not that your child would be abducted. But the conditioning to subjugate one's will to cults later in life begins through these "innocent" little scare the hell out of children programs now. Just my opinion, but nobody would get to teach my child how to live but me.



posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 09:52 AM
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Trust in Allah, but keep your camel tied up."



posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 12:28 PM
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I didn't even mention the MC, "Roadkill Bob". This guy is truly whack. He comes in wearing clown/hobo attire and a big matted wig and starts making fun of the church sponsor's (a great guy) USC affiliation (spoiled children, fries with that degree?, etc.), edumacatiomal stuff, he says. Then he goes on to make some dumb announcements.

The big theme song goes: "I will thank you in my joy, I will thank you in my pain. I'll give thanks for everything, no matter what comes my way." They pantomime a bunch of thanks, joy, and pain moves with their arms and sing the refrain over and over while a 'spirit' team leads from the stage.

Thanks Rant. I'm working on showing my son how to live. That's exactly it.



posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 03:06 PM
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if it's a show or sincere from the other end of the screen here. Best way to be sure is to jump into the mix.

Pray, train, study,
God bless.



posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 03:45 PM
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How old is your son. If he is less then ~7 or less then he will probably miss home and pout about it. But if he's older than ~13 or older he will probably think its the lamest thing you ever put him through and hate you forever(not that he wouldn't otherwise). But if he's ~8-13 and has peers traveling with him he probably get a blast out of it. thats how I would feel.

I was in cubscouts too when I was 5. Man was that lame, even by my standards. It was like extended day care but worse. I had to wear this lame uniorm and then My dad would drive me to the pride house then drive away. Then when I was in there we all had to introduce ourselves. Then one of these hippie ladies with no bra and armpit hair would arrive and we'd do crafts which were LAME. I thought I would be exploring and canoeing and shooting arrows, but all we'd do is put peanut butter on pine cones and sell candy bars. Needless to say I quit that



posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 05:10 PM
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Originally posted by Vegemite
I was in cubscouts too when I was 5. Man was that lame, even by my standards. It was like extended day care but worse. I had to wear this lame uniorm and then My dad would drive me to the pride house then drive away. Then when I was in there we all had to introduce ourselves. Then one of these hippie ladies with no bra and armpit hair would arrive and we'd do crafts which were LAME. I thought I would be exploring and canoeing and shooting arrows, but all we'd do is put peanut butter on pine cones and sell candy bars. Needless to say I quit that


I'm sorry to be laughing sir, but I feel ya. I really, really do.




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