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what weapons do british police use

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posted on Jul, 12 2005 @ 05:30 AM
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and gun producing company would move state if their senator decided to vote for banning guns. The state would lose a lot of jobs and the senator would lose his.




posted on Jul, 12 2005 @ 11:45 AM
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Well the UK has many diffrent police forces;
www.police.uk...



posted on Jul, 12 2005 @ 11:55 AM
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Anyone whos remotley aquianted with the Dennis Bentley and Chris Craig issue here in England will no doubt have a good response as to why the law dont carry guns on the streets..."LET IM AVE IT CHRIS"..



posted on Jul, 12 2005 @ 02:42 PM
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Originally posted by fritz

Sniper and Shotgun - Not sure, as my mate Geordie won't tell me.



Some 7.62 Enfield bolt action according to Janes gun recognition guide.


Generally in my experience of the Met and MDP, most armed officers tend to carry MP5s and Glocks, although in the newspaper i saw some in central London with G36s.



posted on Jul, 13 2005 @ 03:23 PM
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MOD Police are apparently starting to issue the new H&K PDWs.

Regular firearms officers issued weapons vary widely and include:

Walther P990 (DAO version of the P99 - this is issued to Nottingham PD)

Glock 17, MP5 (Semi Auto only) in 9mm, SiG Pro 9mm, SiG P226 9mm, S&W Model 10, H&K G36 Carbine, H&K 93.

Sniper rifle used to be the Enfield Enforcer, that has been replaced with a number of different weapons inclding the pair of 5.56mm weapons mentioned above but fitted with scopes.

The British do not go above 9mm for any of their sidearm choices.



posted on Jul, 13 2005 @ 07:41 PM
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Originally posted by The time lord
Do they have guns in Mexico both police and the public, most likely yes I believe for the same type of reasons, Im just guessing I do not know for sure.
public dont know but have seen police with MP5s and SKS type rifle in mexico



posted on Jul, 19 2008 @ 04:17 PM
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posted on Jul, 20 2008 @ 04:19 AM
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As an ex Brit, I have seen a police-style ARU with short-stocked carbines. They looked bigger than just regular MP5's, but I didn't get a particualrly good look. I can also vouch for an array of weaponry for the Ministry of Defense police. They guard installations and such like. Regularly see them with side arm, and an MP5 hanging off a strap over their shoulders, and hidden, but visible, round their back.
The bobbies main weapon is the truncheon. A heavy, rounded, wooden stick with a lanyard. It is weighted towards the end, like a minature baseball bat, but it is solid hardwood, and by all accounts, hurts like hell.
I've seen bobbies fighting in the streets numerous times, with just their fists...especially on a fri & sat night after the pubs shut. They usually drive round in 'meat wagons' (vans). 2 up front, and 2-5 in the rear. They pull up next to the trouble, jump out, and get tucked in. If it's a big fight, they will go in with truncheons to calm things down quick. If there's arrests, they throw them in the back of the van and take them down to the station for booking or sobering up.
It is different tactics in Britain, as the populous is not allowed firearms. Air rifles are allowed, if cased. Shotguns allowed if you are a land owner, and rifles and handguns if you have a permit, but regulations on permits are very, very strict. Also, there aren't any gun shops anywhere. And no, you can't take our guns away



posted on Jul, 20 2008 @ 04:25 AM
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reply to post by WestPoint23
 


So at one point the public is crapping about too many guns on the streets and police needs to wear guns... but you won't take guns off shop level?
Brilliant...



posted on Jul, 20 2008 @ 10:46 AM
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reply to post by cruzion
 


Police in the UK haven't used the traditional trunceon you describe for many years, preferring the folding PR-24 or ASP type batons these days. CS is also used by beat coppers.

Firearms are carried by Authorised Firearms Officers (AFO), Rrmed Response Vehicle (ARV) crews or dedicated firearms teams (sort of a UK version of SWAT), the most famous of which is CO19 in London. The obvious exception is the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI), who are routinely armed at all times both on and off duty.

PSNI weapons are as follows;

Pistol - Glock 17
Rifle - HK33
SMG - MP5A2/A3
Sniper rifle - HK93
Riot gun - 37mm L104A1 baton gun (modified HK grenade launcher)



posted on Jul, 20 2008 @ 10:54 AM
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the police dont need weapons here as in 5 years ive only ever seen a policeman in a car and only out of it when he is pulling over a motorist togive a ticket and collect a fine. Not the police's fault you can only operate to standards set by the government, but in the uk the police are not there to protect and serve but to collect and be feared.



posted on Jul, 20 2008 @ 11:00 AM
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I'm glad we (uk) don't generally allow the average cop to carry a gun.
Guns breed guns and at the moment we don't have it as bad as the states....where if you don't have a gun then you're in the minority.

I think it's sad that the usa rely so heavily on guns to deal with crime.
I hope nothing changes as far as our beat bobbies go.



posted on Jul, 20 2008 @ 04:11 PM
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Originally posted by blupblup
I'm glad we (uk) don't generally allow the average cop to carry a gun.
Guns breed guns and at the moment we don't have it as bad as the states....where if you don't have a gun then you're in the minority.

I think it's sad that the usa rely so heavily on guns to deal with crime.
I hope nothing changes as far as our beat bobbies go.


Well, as someone who has lived in Texas for the past 8 years, I have to disagree. Violent crimes, robbery, and burgalry are very very low where I live. It is very common for a household to have at least one firearm in the house. That fact in itself is a huge deterant, and criminals see that as too much of a risk. It is different up in the North of the country, as not a great % of people own a firearm, so it is a much easier decision for a criminal to risk his actions, versus the pay off.
You also have the right to protect your neighbors property, and as Texans are very friendly, I know all my neighbors where I live, and they all know each other. We know immediately when something is up. Often times I don't lock my doors, and I am not fearfull. Things haven't been like that in UK for a lot of years.
I'm also not paranoid of being attacked, by even a group of armed invaders with guns or knives, as unlikely as that event is, as I have the tools here to deal with it effectively. Because of my right to bear arms, I feel my familly is very safe, although you might think it scary, because of everyone else has guns, it would be the case (as in UK) where the criminals will have guns, wether we have them or not. But at least in me, and other good citizens possesing a firearm, it equalises any outside threat.
98% of gun owners are good, responsible people, and I, among many others, are glad that we have guns.
Of the 11 houses that are in my cul-de-sac, every single one of them posses at least one firearm, and it is regarded as a good neighborhood. That is what you face as a criminal in south Texas. Would you risk waking someone up when your trying to steal their car? You have to be really stupid to even attempt it. But let's face it; there are some really stupid people out there...gun ownership is not a 100% deterant.



posted on Jul, 21 2008 @ 12:39 PM
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That sounds great, but extremely far from reality.

People who keep guns at home have a 72% greater chance of being killed by firearms and are 3.44 times more likely to commit suicide than those who do not.


Content from external source:

FACT: In 2005 (the most recent year for which data is available), there were 1,019 gun deaths in the state of Illinois, a 3% INCREASE from 2004 statewide gun deaths. The 2005 Illinois gun deaths included:

* 569 homicides (56% of all IL gun deaths),
* 424 suicides (42% of all IL gun deaths),
* and 21 unintentional shootings, 1 legal intervention, and 4 of undetermined intent (2% of all IL gun deaths combined).

-Numbers obtained from CDC National Center for Health Statistics mortality report online, 2008.

FACT:In 2005 (the most recent year for which data is available), there were 30,694 gun deaths in the U.S:

* 12,352 homicides (40% of all U.S gun deaths),
* 17,002 suicides (55% of all U.S gun deaths),
* 789 unintentional shootings, 330 from legal intervention and 221 from undetermined intent (5% of all U.S gun deaths combined).

-Numbers obtained from CDC National Center for Health Statistics mortality report online, 2008.

FACT: Suicide is still the leading cause of firearm death in the U.S., representing 55% of total 2005 gun deaths nationwide. In 2005, the U.S. firearm suicide total was 17,002, a 1.5% INCREASE from 2004 suicide deaths. The state of Illinois saw a nearly 10% INCREASE in gun suicides from 387 in 2004 to 424 in 2005. Most suicides in the U.S. are committed with firearms.
-Numbers obtained from CDC National Center for Health Statistics mortality report online, 2008.

FACT: While handguns account for only one-third of all firearms owned in the United States, they account for more than two-thirds of all firearm-related deaths each year. A gun in the home is 4 times more likely to be involved in an unintentional shooting, 7 times more likely to be used to commit a criminal assault or homicide, and 11 times more likely to be used to attempt or commit suicide than to be used in self-defense.
-A Kellerman, et al. Journal of Trauma, August 1998; Kellerman AL, Lee RK, Mercy JA, et al. "The Epidemiological Basis for the Prevention of Firearm Injuries." Annu.Rev Public Health. 1991; 12:17-40.)

FACT: A gun in the home increases the risk of homicide of a household member by 3 times and the risk of suicide by 5 times compared to homes where no gun is present.
-Kellerman AL, Rivara FP, Somes G, et al. "Suicide in the Home in Relation to Gun Ownership." NEJM. 1992; 327(7):467-472)

FACT: Contrary to popular belief, young children do possess the physical strength to fire a gun: 25% of 3-to-4-year-olds, 70% of 5-to-6-year-olds, and 90% of 7-to-8-year-olds can fire most handguns.
-Naureckas, SM, Christoffel, KK, et al. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 1995.

FACT: Comparison of U.S. gun homicides to other industrialized countries:
In 1998 (the most recent year for which this data has been compiled), handguns murdered:

* 373 people in Germany
* 151 people in Canada
* 57 people in Australia
* 19 people in Japan
* 54 people in England and Wales, and
* 11,789 people in the United States

(*Please note that these 1998 numbers account only for HOMICIDES, and do not include suicides, which comprise and even greater number of gun deaths, or unintentional shootings).
- Provided by the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence


FACT: Among 26 industrialized nations, 86% of gun deaths among children under age 15 occurred in the United States.
- Provided by the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence

FACT: Taxpayers pay more than 85% of the medical cost for treatment of firearm-related injuries.
- Martin M, et al. "The Cost of Hospitalization for Firearm Injuries." JAMA. Vol 260, November 25, 1998, pp 3048, and Ordog et al. "Hospital Costs of Firearm Injuries." Abstract. Journal of Trauma. February 1995, p1)

FACT: While handguns account for only one-third of all firearms owned in the United States, they account for more than two-thirds of all firearm-related deaths each year. A gun kept in the home is 22 times more likely to be used in a homicide, suicide or unintentional shooting than to be used in self-defense.



Source www.ichv.org...



So we (uk/europe) don't have as many guns and i feel a hell of a lot safer here than i would in the USA.
Keep your guns


[edit on 21/7/08 by blupblup]




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