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NEWS: New Species Of Dolphin Discovered

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posted on Jul, 5 2005 @ 07:08 PM
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I can hear the Japanese cheering from here.

New fish to make sushi from, I imagine they will be hunting them for "experimental" reasons soon....




posted on Jul, 5 2005 @ 07:16 PM
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Originally posted by Netchicken
I can hear the Japanese cheering from here.

New fish to make sushi from, I imagine they will be hunting them for "experimental" reasons soon....


Damn, I just looked up "dolphin sushi" on google and saw a VERY disturbing image of Japanese dolphin hunting... Damn.

Anyway, dolphins are mammals.


Zip



posted on Jul, 5 2005 @ 07:17 PM
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Well my take on this whole matter is how can you be so sure that this is simply just an undiscovered Species? Could the Snubfin Dolphin be the product of the macroevolution of the Irrawady Dolphin?

Think about it. The Irrawady has been almost irradicated. Could this new Dolphin be the result of the Irrawady evolving to meet the new dangers presented by humans?

I would be interested to see exactly what abilities and traits these new Dolphins have so that I could compare them to the Irrawady. Also it would be prudent to monitor the population of the Snubfin to see if it increases in the future.



posted on Jul, 5 2005 @ 07:34 PM
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We have several "Wolphins" living here in Sea Life Park. They had an Atlantic Bottle Nose living with a False Killer Whale, simply for the sake of convenience, when suddenly the Dolphin became pregnant. The baby was born with much darker coloring, a shorter snout, and a smaller dorsal fin. They announced that it was sterile, and would be the only one in the world, two years later, it had a baby. I believe there are now two to three of them living in the park. There have been four born, counting the original one, but two of them didn't survive.

gohawaii.about.com...

[edit on 5-7-2005 by Zaphod58]



posted on Jul, 5 2005 @ 08:09 PM
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I love to hear about the new discovery of animals. Sorts of puts a prospective on our knowledge of this wonderful little rock.



posted on Jul, 5 2005 @ 08:26 PM
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welllllll.............. i dont know what to think about it. it looks fake but if it is real we can injoy it before it is in some pochers home or in a museum.



posted on Jul, 5 2005 @ 09:08 PM
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"False killer whales are actually members of the dolphin family and unrelated to killer whales. " that article just confused me, it really did. :|



posted on Jul, 5 2005 @ 09:16 PM
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They're called False Killer Whales, because they are black in color, like the Orca, and bigger than dolphins. They're members of the Dolphin Family, but they don't look like Dolpins.

Here's a pic and a small blurb about them.
www.nsrl.ttu.edu...



posted on Jul, 5 2005 @ 09:19 PM
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O.K. it kind of makes more sense now, kind of.

I guess species which are "strongly" linked together can in fact breed with one another. I wonder if we could have mixed with neanderthals (not saying we did)? Is an interesting think to think about.



posted on Jul, 5 2005 @ 09:22 PM
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I've never understood how they come up with names for animals. Some of them make sense, and some of them I just sit there and go "huh?" lol. That does make you wonder, if maybe there was some interbreeding with earlier humans to get where we are today.



posted on Jul, 5 2005 @ 09:25 PM
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This inter-breeding could explain a lot of people in the U.K. after all, somepeople in the papers like to say they behave like neanderthals. lol



posted on Jul, 5 2005 @ 09:28 PM
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It would also explain the deep south region of the US.
There's supposed to be alot of interbreeding going on there.



posted on Jul, 6 2005 @ 01:29 AM
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Very interesting indeed. Just goes to show you that we don't know everything yet. But we like to think we do.

Dolphins(including Orcas) are very intelligent animals. They do not breed within their pod.

I run a whale watching boat out of Vancouver into the San Juan Islands in BC and you get to see them in their natural habitat doing what they normally do. A lot of co-operation among the members of a pod(since they're all related), other females will help a new born in it's first few hours by pushing it to the surface so it can breath. They are very social and like to play especially in the wakes of large ships. They like to surf in them and breech out of them.

So we should do what we can to protect them and learn more about them.



posted on Jul, 6 2005 @ 01:56 AM
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Originally posted by subz
A new species of dolphin has been discovered in the waters of Northern Australia. The Snubfin dolphin is the first new dolphin species to be discovered in 30 years. The snubfin dolphin (Orcaella heinsohni) was named in honour of a university professor, George Heinsohn, who worked at the University that discovered it. It was originally thought to be a Irrawady dolphin until DNA tests revealed it was a new species

[edit on 5/7/05 by subz]


Wow, what a find. Beautiful, I love dolphins they are so intelligent and beautiful. Hope they don't go into extinction like they are saying in the article. Someday I hope people will care more for other animals as they care for themselves.


[edit on 7/6/2005 by Rhiannon1968]



posted on Jul, 6 2005 @ 06:57 AM
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At least we have this new "species" DNA. At least now if we end up destorying another species once we come to realise what we are doing they will hopefully be able to re-introduce the species back into the waters.

Just like Jurassic Park, but with dolphins.



posted on Jul, 10 2005 @ 02:44 PM
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Originally posted by SportyMB

Originally posted by Lordling
How do we know that their population hasn't always been at this level, since we just "discovered" them?


I seriously doubt a species could maintain "50" in a non-controlled enviorment.....look at the endangered species in Africa....even they have assisistance to help keep the numbers up.

Humans are the ones screwing it all up.....coastal dolphins, humans definately had thier part in keeping the numbers down..ships, developements, etc...etc...


I understand what you're saying. I suppose what I was really getting at, was that species population dynamics is an extremely complex science. When you figure in metapopulations (if existant) vs. local populations, compared to natality & death rates due to bycatch, predation (if existant), disease, pollution, loss of habitat, etc, etc., it's a bag full of variables. As I understand, typical population growth rates for most dolphin species are at around 2%. If this species is a relatively new arrival on the scene (again, due to what? emigration, adaptation?), then they may not yet have reached a stable population density in the region, or, for all we know, this number (50, which is an estimate based on what?), may be normal for a small local population, or may be completely inaccurate in the first place.



posted on Jul, 10 2005 @ 03:17 PM
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I love dolphins! And boy is he a cutie!

I'm with you - I hope we keep finding new species. Every time we do it makes me realize the humility we should have - we really don't know all that much!



posted on Aug, 3 2008 @ 01:28 AM
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Mr snubfin and i Are Great Friends..


I Find it undeniably Juvenile that he would swim in infested waters.




SWIM BITCH SWIMM.



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