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Megalodan, are they still alive and still swimming near you?

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posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 12:58 PM
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imagine if they were right there!!!!







this one looks too big, maybe a replica or maybe real.


english.pravda.ru...


Hundreds of Megalodon teeth that have been found in the oceans and rock beds all over the world prove that the giant shark was about 80 feet long (almost 25 meters). Only a sperm-whale is larger than Megalodon, which makes the giant shark the largest predator on Earth ever, including dinosaurs. Scientists say that the giant shark could swallow a small car, but most likely, this is an exaggeration. The shark from the movie “Jaws” is a small fish in comparison with the Megalodon monster shark. However, doesn’t zoology go too far when it says that this monster shark might still live nowadays?

Great white shark experts Richard Ellis and John E. McCosker included a chapter about Megalodon in their book “Great White Shark” (1991). Richard Ellis wrote that all the fossilized shark teeth found so far indicated that the shark is extinct. However, Ellis added that the discovery a recent tooth of the monster would be a great concern to all zoologists. If this happens, "we would know that the giant shark became extinct quite recently," wrote Ellis, "or is flourishing somewhere in the vastness of the oceans and has simply lost a tooth."

Can it be possible? Almost everyone who has studied the giant shark realizes that if Megalodon is extinct, it happened not long ago, from the geological point of view. The great Megalodon lived 50 million years ago. However, Ellis affirms that the monster became extinct “recently” – about ten thousand years ago.

History proves that these large animals might remain hidden from the modern science, especially when it comes to the deep ocean. If the famous coelacanth fish could remain undisturbed for 60 million years, why couldn’t the Megalodon shark survive ten thousand years? To all appearances, Ellis does not see much of a problem there: "Except for the fact that we have not found one, there appears to be no reason why Megalodon might not be flourishing today." Ellis feels that no concrete evidence has been found for Megalodon's current existence. "But there will always be those who keep hoping that one will appear. Let us hope we are not in the water when it does."

Has it already appeared? Ellis wrote about an amazing incident, which happened in Australia. It was taken from David G. Stead's “Sharks and Rays of Australian Seas,” published in 1963.

“In the year 1918, I recorded the sensation that had been caused among the "outside" crayfish men at Port Stephens, when, for several days, they refused to go to their regular fishing grounds in the vicinity of Broughton Island. The men had been at work on the fishing grounds--which lie in deep water--when an immense shark of almost unbelievable proportions put in an appearance, lifting pot after pot containing many crayfishes, and taking, as the men said, "pots, mooring lines, and all."

Those crayfish pots were three feet and six inches in diameter. They basically contained up to three dozens large crayfish, each weighing several pounds. All the people who saw it said that the shark was unimaginably monstrous. However, the lengths that they gave were absurd. Most likely, they were overwhelmed with what they saw. But these were men who were used to the sea, all sorts of weather, and all kinds of sharks. One of those men said that that shark was at least 300 feet (92 meters) long. Others said that it was as long as their pier: almost 115 feet (35 meters).


www.megalodonteeth.com...


The most widely accepted maximum size for the megalodon is a length of approximately 55-65 feet. One thing is for certain, however; the megalodon was at least two or three times larger than the Great White.




posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 01:04 PM
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Though there are oftimes revelations of previously extinct 'critters' that are discovered (usually around Madascar or New Jersey)........and those discoveries are in fact fascinating examples of the durability of some life forms............. a living, function Megalodon would have such a voracious appetite, that it could not possibly have gone unnoticed.
It would have cleaned out long ago, major areas of fishing in our oceans, and surely have been spotted based only on this 'wake of destruction'

Cool idea though.

Take heart.......... there are lots of other places for lesser varmints to hide.



posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 02:24 PM
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There have been stories from new south wales, that a giant whitw shark roams the nearby fishing grounds and has a habbit of snatching crayfish pots. They claim it to be 100 ft. long(which is impossible) but gives you an idea of how big it could be, maybe half that size? which is the size megalodon is supposed to have been. They have named the shark "Lord of the Deep" of course i find information on it difficult to come by.



posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 02:44 PM
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I saw this on tv a while back. It had some ocean guy on there saying that it still exists & that he spotted one in the Indian Ocean. He also stated that there were very few left & they were in waters in the Indian oceans southern side. But where he got his info from, i dont know.



posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 03:14 PM
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Ive always loved to think that these beasts are still alive down in the depths somewhere, we may never know.

Ocean guy? Classsic!!



posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 03:24 PM
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Certainly an interesting account (the 1918 one)...

I've heard rumors of non-fossilized Megalodan teeth, but never anything concrete...



posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 06:11 PM
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That's what got me to. Whatever it was those fisherman saw was enough for them not to want to go back out to sea.

After jaws, swimming in the sea for me was and has never been the same. Even at Seaford on the Sussex coast. lol

Honestly, it would be just my luck.



posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 06:42 PM
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someone want to track its possible locations down?? go look for it???? NO???? jesus from the scale drawing it could crush a mini sub in its jaws without even noticing...

the thing would have to be extremely strong to withstand extreme pressure depths, which is the only place it could survive unnoticed. So yea! its completely possible. we have afterall only explored 2 percent (2 PERCENT!!!!!) of our oceans. and already there are thousands of separate species.

thousands in 2 %? someone get actually how many species there are discovered and do the math for 100% please.



posted on Jul, 2 2005 @ 08:23 AM
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Its possible, but not very likely. As almost everyone said, it would have to live at great depths, but that is nothing impossible for a very large fish.

That tooth in your last photo must be a replica, I think the biggest found where some 20cm long, and I have one with about 12cm, but its a shame it is broken.





posted on Jul, 2 2005 @ 08:55 PM
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Well, It is possible for it to still live but highly not plausible. It would have to consume alot of fish to support its diet. Unless it feeds on Giant Squid. It would found already if it was still living in my opinion.



posted on Jul, 2 2005 @ 09:06 PM
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I think Megaladon is thought to have gone extinct during the last ice age as their main food, whales, were able to adapt by growing blubber and tolerating colder waters and moving polewards while the fish could not.

I think it's possible some could survive, but it's highly unlikely.



posted on Jul, 3 2005 @ 01:16 PM
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"A frozen example of Carcharodon Megalodon, a cousin of the Great White was found in melting ice by scientists working at the American Antarctic base on the Ross ice shelf in early 2004. It is thought to be several tens of millions of years old and is huge. Its jaws are around 15 metres/48 foot. They are still digging it out so don't know how long it is."

www.dogsbreathdivers.com...



posted on Jul, 3 2005 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by Shadow88
someone want to track its possible locations down?? go look for it???? NO???? jesus from the scale drawing it could crush a mini sub in its jaws without even noticing...

the thing would have to be extremely strong to withstand extreme pressure depths, which is the only place it could survive unnoticed. So yea! its completely possible. we have afterall only explored 2 percent (2 PERCENT!!!!!) of our oceans. and already there are thousands of separate species.

thousands in 2 %? someone get actually how many species there are discovered and do the math for 100% please.


Damn, someone had to beat me to it. I wanted to be the one who sounded smart



posted on Jul, 7 2005 @ 02:29 PM
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>Anyone know anything else on this link?

It strikes me as odd that the pictures beneath the statement are of a great white in the water, and not of a megalodon frozen in the ice. I've looked around online, I don't find any reference anywhere to any shark finds in the Ross ice shelf. I've just sent email dogsbreathdivers and sport diver magazine asking for confirmation.

I'll post if and when I get an answer.



posted on Jul, 7 2005 @ 04:22 PM
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Originally posted by LordBucket


...... and not of a megalodon frozen in the ice.
I've looked around online, I don't find any reference anywhere to any shark finds in the Ross ice shelf.




the only thing that might lead to a trail
is this page focusing on C. Megalodon

theres a few stories, i think the 1918 monster that ate up crab-pots
is repeated here.

& the last noted 'live' sighting was claimed in 1978-ish

theres stories of non-fossilized teeth here too

but no references to an Antarctic, ice bound, ?cadavar? fzn fish stick?

here: www.ncf.carleton.ca...

[the 'cousin' site, googled thru "Cryptozoology, Megalodon" was a broken link!!]or maybe the 'megamouth shark' site at megamouth.elizaga.net...

?an honest error....

[edit on 7-7-2005 by St Udio]

[edit on 7-7-2005 by St Udio]



posted on Jul, 7 2005 @ 11:31 PM
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People, take a look at the source -- it's Pravda.

Pravda is the Russian equivalent of the Weekly World News. I'm surprised they didn't throw BatBoy into this article.

Here's a picture of a real megalodon tooth:
www.trekker.co.il...



posted on Jul, 8 2005 @ 02:48 AM
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I think it is posible for this type of prehistoric shark to still be living , but most of the sightings that i have read about occurerd near the tip of south America. there is a fishing village that was visited by a writer who interviewed local fishermen who had cliamed to see this giant shark, it was said to be creamy white with a few blotches on it about 75 feet long. The writer said that these normally matcho fishermen were scared stiff of this thing.
Hey if Ogopogo & Nessie can still be swimming around why cant this relic.
Parker



posted on Jul, 8 2005 @ 03:27 AM
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Hey maybe, just look at the "Coelacanth", prehistoric blue/silvery fish thought to have been made extinct 70 million years ago, but, discovered in tropical fishing waters around Asia.

Wouldn't even put a toe in the Oceans if it was found alive though (megalodon)

Interesting tit-bit.....The megamouth shark, also thought extinct, but again, found alive in present times.

-QM.



posted on Jul, 12 2005 @ 12:50 PM
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I dont think it would be possible for it to still exist, atleast in its previous gargantuan form. A shark that big would have to eat a lot of food, and I doubt ocean's today have prey big enough to sustain them.

perhaps ol' megalodon evolved into today's Great white sharks?



posted on Jul, 17 2005 @ 03:18 AM
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I'm sure someone around here could figure out the number of giant-shark-like-monsters necessary to maintain a breeding population, and how much they would eat, and how much they would affect the environment etc., making them more likely to be noticed.

I'd like to hear about that.

Geesh...i saw jaws a really long time ago...and i'm still nervous about it.




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