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Canberra Replacement? The options?

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RAB

posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 02:18 AM
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By the early 1950s, the English Electric Canberra bomber and reconnaissance aircraft had become one of the mainstays of the British Royal Air Force (RAF). Although the Canberra was an excellent aircraft, and in fact is still performing useful, if limited, military service in the 21st century, by the middle of the 1950s it was obviously behind the times.

So it's 2005 and yes the RAF are still flying the Canberra in a recon role, ok it has been upgraded to a new standard and the systems are bang upto date. But is it time for the UK to consider replcing the remain 5 planes with some thing else.

So the big question is what would you replace such a excellent plane with, within the same role?

Ideas please, ladies and gentlemen

RAB




posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 02:34 AM
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Actually the coolest Canberra I ever saw was the WB-57 that NASA used to fly.

img.villagephotos.com...

I don't really know enough about what they do with them to suggest replacements. Recon is such a general term. Do they do ELINT with them? Take pics with them? It depends on what the mission is.


RAB

posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 02:42 AM
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they use them in photo recon using a photo system developed from the same system on the U2.

The aircraft's camera fit has developed through a number of stages over its life. A variety of daytime 'wet' cameras can be carried for medium and higher level vertical and oblique photography and survey cameras can also be fitted. An optional self-contained sensor, recording imagery in digital format on magnetic tape for exploitation at a ground station can now be carried. In addition to the sensor platform updates, the PR9 has a much enhanced navigation suite and defensive systems.

source: www.raf.mod.uk...

RAB

[edit on 30-6-2005 by RAB]



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 02:55 AM
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Oh, it's what the US called the RB-57. It was a precursor to the U-2. That's a hard question, because there aren't many platforms out there that would be good at that mission. I would say the U-2 is the best out there right now for photo recon. If it was battlefield recon, I'd say make a photopod version of the Tornado like the RF-4 the US used, if they haven't already. For something like this....I'd go with the U-2. It's tempermental, vulnerable, hard to fly, but there's nothing that does the mission like it does anymore.

[edit on 30-6-2005 by Zaphod58]



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 03:44 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
Oh, it's what the US called the RB-57. It was a precursor to the U-2. That's a hard question, because there aren't many platforms out there that would be good at that mission. I would say the U-2 is the best out there right now for photo recon. If it was battlefield recon, I'd say make a photopod version of the Tornado like the RF-4 the US used, if they haven't already. For something like this....I'd go with the U-2. It's tempermental, vulnerable, hard to fly, but there's nothing that does the mission like it does anymore.

[edit on 30-6-2005 by Zaphod58]


The RAF allready have a Tornado for recon

www.raf.mod.uk...

and they are now equiped with RAPTOR

www.raf.mod.uk...

made by the BF Goodrich compnay



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 03:52 AM
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That's why I said if they haven't already. I don't know the variants of the Tornado.



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 05:38 AM
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Talking of the RB-57, I think I've found some at the Davis-Monthan "Boneyard"
maps.google.com...,-110.841515&spn=0.0 10539,0.014636&t=k&hl=en
Zoom in, there's a couple of "regular" models, and one with the extended wings. (I'm not sure what the official designation was....)
In fact, there's a lot of interesting stuff in that frame!



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 05:44 AM
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Sho nuff! There's an RB-57 right there in the center of the pic. But man that's depressing to see all those BUFFs sitting there chopped up.
There's a whole bunch of B-57s in there. I see a total of 4 RB-57s, so far. Lots of C-141As, and B-52s. Some P-3s, what look like either EF-111s, or F-111s. I think EFs though as they're grey, some F-14s..... Great pic, but sad to see so many good birds come to a sad end. Thanks for the link.



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 06:09 AM
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It's would be great just to walk through there and get to pic one aircraftto take. Most of thoses planes would and could be flying in other Air Forces.

Looks like Iraqi and Afgan AIr Force replacement planes to me.


And man...are those F-14 drying up there?

As for a canberra replacement, I think a Typhoon variant is exactly what is needed. Anything else would be overkill in the age of RPVs and satellites.

Or, go high tech and get some Global Hawks. Again they fit exactly the canberra niche.

[edit on 6/30/2005 by soulforge]



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 07:16 AM
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Replacement for the Canberra? it should have been the TSR-2 damn it...

The most modern replacement would indeed be a long range UAV of some sort, either that or a high speed recon aircraft or TR-3B



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 09:25 AM
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look at all those `varks!!

makes my heart cry



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 11:45 AM
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There was a programme on discovery wings following the RAF's last few Canberra's and on there the crews said that , because of the specific roles carried out by the canberra, some of them classified, and the sheer viariety of missions that the airframe allows they have been unable to fine one single airframe that will do all the jobs, let alone do them as well as the Canberra does them. Remarkable for a plane that flew in the forties. When asked directly what would be the ideal replacement in his personal view the commanding officer said something close to "Apart from new Canberra's? I really have no idea". So if HE dfoesn't know what chance do we have?


Incidentally, soulforge was closest, as the CO of the Canberra unit said they were evaluating the Global Hawk for 'some' of the Canberra's missions.



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 01:17 PM
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India too for some reason have'nt replaced those ageing Canberra's that they got in 1958!

external image

But only some of them are being replaced with Russian Tu-22M3 Backfire long-range nuclear bombers


the remaining are being upgraded with Israeli, Russian & French aveonics components

Pakistan are scared of their witts, check this out : www.pakalert.net...



Replace this worthless junk external image
external image

with this custom modified, heavily effective :




[edit on 30-6-2005 by Stealth Spy]



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 01:58 PM
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When my dad was serving in Vietnam, my family lived in Salina, Kansas and my Boy Scout Troop would go night hiking on the Smoky Hill Air Force Bomb Range. Sometimes the Canberras would fly over and drop parachute flares. I also remember seeing Veitnam era footage of wartime missions. Growing up, it seemed like Canberras were at all the airbases where my dad was stationed. I would like to see todays planes stand the kind of test of time that the Canberra has. It was interesting to see that the U2 was proposed as a replacement, because this is almost as aged as the Canberra, although they are constantly updated with "block" upgrades. Also in 1980 the assembly line was reopened. I do not know how many were produced, but in 2003 the inventory was 31 aircraft according to "International Air Power Review" volume 14.



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 06:20 PM
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Originally posted by Stealth Spy


which aircraft is this ?
looks cool



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 11:10 PM
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Tu-22M3 Backfire long-range nuclear bombers. India has alredy placed a lease order for them.


Edit: removed big-quote compound quote violation. Please be aware that there is no need to quote an entire post, especially when it is directly the post before your post.
Warnings for excessive quoting, and how to quote

[edit on 1-7-2005 by Seekerof]



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 11:32 PM
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It looks cool, but from everything I've heard, it's a pig to maintain. It's fast, but difficult to keep in flying condition at times.



posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 10:04 AM
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Honestly i dont know why Australia should too should protest the acquiring of these Tu-22M3 by the Indian Air Force.


I can understand pakistan's protest, but
Why should Australia feel threatened ??...puzzling to say the least.

How can this supposedly "destabilise half of the southern hemisphere" as some protestors put it ?



posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 10:15 AM
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My Parents live close to RAF Marham so I often drop by for a half day under the approach when I visit. Last week I was lucky enough to be sitting there with two PR-9's in the circuit at the same time. I'll miss them when they are gone, I still miss the Victors



posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 07:52 PM
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Originally posted by Stealth Spy
Tu-22M3 Backfire long-range nuclear bombers. India has alredy placed a lease order for them.


Good for them, Pakistan will be shaking already. Then again, big bombers are still VERY vunerable to everything. If they had bought Su-34s instead, they might be more useful.

Btw, the pics you posted, are that of the Tu-22. The Tu-22M is a very different aircraft.

And, lease orders are as good as buying. How long are the Indians going to lease them?




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