It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Date Debate

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 28 2005 @ 08:19 AM
link   
This may seem trivial, but it is really fundamental.

I say that 2005 has already ended, and as of today, we are five months and twenty-eight days into 2006.

My premise is: You don't get credit for a year until it is over. ie. You are not born one year old, you turn one at the end of your first year.

Anybody want to bother with this one?






posted on Jun, 28 2005 @ 10:45 AM
link   

Originally posted by Icarus Rising
This may seem trivial, but it is really fundamental.

I say that 2005 has already ended, and as of today, we are five months and twenty-eight days into 2006.

My premise is: You don't get credit for a year until it is over. ie. You are not born one year old, you turn one at the end of your first year.

Anybody want to bother with this one?








isn't our calendar a mess anyway ? didn't constantine change it ?

What is the Julian calendar?
The Julian calendar was introduced by Julius Caesar (bust at right) in 45 B.C.E. Author David Duncan says the Julian calendar was born of Caesar's tryst with Cleopatra.

Before the Julian calendar was introduced, priests in the Roman Empire exploited the calendar for political ends, inserting days and even months into the calendar to keep the politicians they favored in office. Tired of the chaos that this undependable system eventually gave rise to, Julius Caesar finally set out to put the long-abused calendar back on track.

It was in common use until the 1500s, when countries started changing to the Gregorian calendar (section the modern year). However, some countries (for example, Greece and Russia) used it into the 1900s, and the Orthodox church in Russia still uses it, as do some other Orthodox churches.

In the Julian calendar, the tropical year is approximated as 365 1/4 days = 365.25 days. This gives an error of 1 day in approximately 128 years.

The approximation 365 1/4 is achieved by having 1 leap year every 4 years.
webexhibits.org...


based on the romans adding a month just to keep someone in office, I'd argue noone has any idea what year it is


[edit on 28-6-2005 by syrinx high priest]



posted on Jun, 28 2005 @ 04:50 PM
link   
I agree dates and calenders are kind of arbitrary conventions, but once you choose a system, logic should dictate its function. Logically, we are halfway through 2006, not 2005.



posted on Jun, 28 2005 @ 10:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by Icarus Rising
I agree dates and calenders are kind of arbitrary conventions, but once you choose a system, logic should dictate its function. Logically, we are halfway through 2006, not 2005.



ok cool



posted on Jun, 29 2005 @ 01:05 AM
link   
Yes, dates are WAY off. Calenders are just to organize and plan.
Life is but an instant.



posted on Jun, 29 2005 @ 01:19 AM
link   
do you think that it was changed/altered on purpose maybe, to throw us off of dates and times of prophecy? ie; 2012, etc



posted on Jun, 29 2005 @ 01:25 AM
link   
No, not at all. Calenders were invented through humans. Or we base it on the movement of the sun. Seasons. People set how many days are in each month, how many months are in a year. We set hours and minutes. Blah, blah, blah, BLAH. Life naturally is not based on a certain amount of time. As I said, it’s nothing but an instant. It would seem completely invalid to assume that “something” will happen in the year 6-6-6 and all that BS.



posted on Jun, 29 2005 @ 07:27 AM
link   
It is interesting to note that we take calenders for granted as the yardstick of our existence. It is possible that they have been manipulated, as syrinx has aptly pointed out, and for more than just political advantage. We all cast a wary eye toward the future at times, wondering what it portends. Is there some kind of internal time tracking system within us that is at odds with the current calender? Has the calender been deliberately manipulated to cast a veil of confusion over our internal clocks, or am I just one of those people who goes around saying OMG SOMETHING ISN'T RIGHT, and waiting for the other shoe to fall?

It makes sense to have 24 hours in a day given the Earth's equatorial circumference and rotational speed. The same goes for 365 days a year, or so, given our orbit period around the sun. From those basic elements, how much of the coming future events is it possible to predict? Sixty seconds in a minute, and sixty minutes in an hour seem more or less arbitrarily assigned. Why those values? To concentrate our focus on the moment, and not on the big picture (whatever that is)?

Maybe thats where all the millennial movements get their impetus. We know something big is coming, we're just not sure exactly when.



posted on Jun, 29 2005 @ 01:18 PM
link   
This is kind of why there is no validity in my mind to the 2012 prophecies, etc. For example, it is the year 5765, almost 5766, in the Hebrew Calendar. We won't even go into the other calendars that are out there. It's all just subjective.

A quick look at the Islamic Calendar:

Years are counted since the Hijra, that is, Mohammed's emigration to Medina in AD 622. On 16 July (Julian calendar) of that year, AH 1 started (AH = Anno Hegirae = year of the Hijra).




For a more complete rundown on the Islamic calendar:

webexhibits.org...


Look at the Chinese:

www.new-year.co.uk...

The Chinese Lunar New Year is the longest chronological record in history, dating from 2600BC, when the Emperor Huang Ti introduced the first cycle of the zodiac.




Edited to add a few more bits on the Calendars





[edit on 29-6-2005 by sigung86]



posted on Jun, 29 2005 @ 03:39 PM
link   
Calenders are so subjective, there just in place to help humans grasp a concept of time. I wish there was one set truthful calender but unfortunately there not.




top topics



 
0

log in

join