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NEWS: Say "Konichiwa" to Robocop

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posted on Jun, 26 2005 @ 10:23 AM
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In a technological development straight out of films like "Terminator" and "Robocop", a Japanese security company has already begun negotiating with several clients to provide a robot security guard, the "Guardrobo D1", to assist in protecting offices, shopping malls and banks.
 



sg.news.yahoo.com
Equipped with a camera and sensors, the "Guardrobo D1," developed by Japanese security firm Sohgo Security Services Co., is designed to patrol along pre-programed paths and keep an eye out for signs of trouble.

The 109-cm tall robot will alert human guards via radio and by sending camera footage if it detects intruders, fires, or even water leaks.

Sohgo Security is negotiating with several clients, and after an initial trial run hopes to begin offering a robot-assisted security system within a year, the company said.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


It's the stuff of Hollywood films and science fiction; robotic police, robot warriors and deadly unmanned flying ships. But thanks to modern technology, science fiction is rapidly becoming science reality.

Anti-terrorist sensor robots may be patrolling the stadiums at the World Cup in Germany next year.


www.we-make-money-not-art.com...
The 1.20 meters (almost four feet) "OFRO+detect" could soon be employed to protect next year's World Cup in Germany by hindering potential terrorist attacks.

Developed by Berlin-based company Robowatch Technologies, OFRO can take over dangerous, and tedious, duties such as checking for atomic, biological and chemical, or ABC, weapons.



During its 12 hours of operation time, OFRO can cover 10,000 square meters at a speed of five kilometers (3.1 miles) per hour, using its thermal camera and sensors to detect possible terror hazards. The robot wirelessly transmits the information collected at a central location. It also takes air samples and should there be irregularities, it sounds an alarm. Nothing can get in OFRO's way and it can steer through fan crowds all by itself.


USAF Predator Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), previously used only for reconnaissance before the advent of the "War on Terrorism", are already killing people in Iraq and Afghanistan. The impetus for arming these flying killers was the dubious report that one had "spotted" Osama Bin Laden but was unequipped to attack, and because of this, a chance to kill OBL slipped away.




www.cnn.com
WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Newly released military video reveals unmanned U.S. Predators firing Hellfire missiles to rescue U.S. troops under fire in Iraq and destroy insurgent targets.

The U.S. Air Force released 10 video clips Tuesday in response to requests from CNN and other television networks. The black and white footage, all from the summer and fall of 2004, shows what officials say are insurgents planting roadside bombs, firing at U.S. positions and gathering to attack U.S. troops.

The video came from sensors on Air Force Predator unmanned aerial vehicles, which can operate several miles away from positions they target and monitor.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


The U.S. Department of Defense is also working on developing Unmanned Combat Armed Rotorcraft (UCAR), or unmanned military helicopters.


www.military.comThe U.S. military's highest-profile robo-copter project, the Unmanned Combat Armed Rotorcraft (UCAR) program, crashed and burned a few months back, after the Army decided to pass on funding the UCAR's next, $160 million phase. UCAR researchers were working on some pretty cool concepts for the craft, like voice-controlled commands. And computer simulation were showing that, by adding drones to the mix, helicopter teams get a whole lot more vicious - and a whole lot harder to shoot down. With the fear of losing a pilot gone, the unmanned copters could go after pixilated enemies way more aggressively. But ultimately, UCAR was considered too high risk a program for the Army to pursue with two major conflicts still going on.



But some smaller efforts are continuing. The Army recently test-fired a set of rockets from one of its Vigilante unmanned copters. In the December trial, the 1,100 pound, 26-foot long craft -- which can go up to 12,000 feet, fly as fast as 75 knots, and stay in the air for about 5 hours - was under the control of human pilots, flying nearby in a UH-1 "Huey" copter. The test, over the Yuman proving grounds in Arizona, marked the first time a first rotary-wing drone let loose such weapons. In the not-too-far future, the drone is expected to make the step up to launching guided missiles, like the Advanced Precision Kill Weapon System (APKWS).


Not having to worry about losing human lives can allow commanders to be much more aggressive in combat maneuvers.The future of military technology definitely lies in unmanned or remote-controlled "troops" and vehicles, since the single most prohibitive cost of war is the human one, especially from the standpoint of public support.

Domestically speaking, robotic police walking around droning, "Your move, creep", or dubiously intelligent ED-209s asking you repeatedly to "Please put down your weapon" may be a ways in the future, but with RFID chips rapidly becoming a part of everyday society, cameras mounted on highways and in public areas, biometric identification and face recognition technology, the surveillance net is definitely closing in tight, and it may not be so long before non-human surveillance becomes non-human control.

[edit on 2005/6/26 by wecomeinpeace]




posted on Jun, 26 2005 @ 12:05 PM
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Here's another security robot just released.




msnbc.msn.com...



posted on Jun, 26 2005 @ 12:45 PM
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The pic you posted Grady is the one that goes with the story.
Sohgo Security Services.

Saw the story two days ago, but thought no one would be interested. Guess I was wrong, but interesting development for sure. I can see it fighting fires but still trying to figure out how it will stop intruders any better then a security cam now does? May be they will come equipped with tazers


[edit on 6/26/2005 by shots]



posted on Jun, 26 2005 @ 01:04 PM
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Originally posted by shots
I can see it fighting fires but still trying to figure out how it will stop intruders any better then a security cam now does? May be they will come equipped with tazers.




The 45 inch tall robot will alert human guards via radio and by sending camera footage if it detects intruders, fires, or even water leaks.
msnbc.msn.com...


I guess the old adage is true. Nothing will ever really replace boots on the ground.



posted on Jun, 27 2005 @ 12:42 PM
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Should be interesting to see what happens when it "stops an intruder" who is someone's kid during a "bring your kid to work" day, and they wander into an unauthorized area.....

Lets just hope those employing these things take some precautions, hmm?



Nothing can get in OFRO's way and it can steer through fan crowds all by itself.


I'm pretty sure I'd be getting out of it's way, whether 30 seconds to comply or not!



posted on Jun, 27 2005 @ 10:27 PM
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Great coverage wecomeinpeace. Thanks. ...I did not know this, "USAF Predator Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), ...are already killing people in Iraq and Afghanistan." Ewww.

Your point, "the surveillance net is definitely closing in tight, and it may not be so long before non-human surveillance becomes non-human control," is well made, and well taken. Back to the Matrix.

.



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