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ATS: Air Force Finds No Trace of Lost Nuke

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posted on Jun, 20 2005 @ 09:57 PM
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What an interesting "fossil" it will be, 1,000,000 years from now.




posted on Jun, 20 2005 @ 10:18 PM
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Yeah, but how'd you like the be the poor schmuk to find it. heh.



posted on Jun, 24 2005 @ 03:22 AM
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Originally posted by HowardRoark
What an interesting "fossil" it will be, 1,000,000 years from now.


This actually poses a problem for scientists How do you mark such sites such as Yucca Mountain if they bury tons of stuff there? You need something to scare people off that may not understand our culture or language.

How do you design a "Keep Out!" sign to last 10,000 years?


Imagine you're part of an archaeological expedition 6,000 years from today, stomping around the desert in an area known long ago as Yucca Mountain, Nev. You are looking for the remnants of a once flourishing civilization, a nation state that apparently called itself the USA back in 2002. You're 10 days into your quest, not finding much of anything, when one of your team runs up, all sweaty-faced and panting, insisting that you come see what he's discovered.

You follow your flushed, jabbering colleague around a rocky outcropping, and there, vividly etched on a granite monolith, is a towering reproduction of Macauley Culkin in "Home Alone," hands to face, mouth agape; or maybe it's one of Francis Bacon's shrieking pope paintings or Edvard Munch's "The Scream."

You don't recognize any of these startling cultural icons from the distant past; you don't know who made them, or what they symbolize. Hell, you don't even know that they're cultural icons, but the whole scene briefly scares the bejesus out of you. Then, like Howard Carter stumbling on the tomb of Tutankhamen, you experience a serious rush of exhilaration, aggravated by a serious case of the heebie-jeebies, as you realize that you've just chanced on a history-making breakthrough, a discovery of earthshaking significance.
www.wagingpeace.org...


[edit on 6/24/05 by FredT]



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 04:58 PM
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Apparently there are 92 such cases from over the years. 93 Now, I guess. How the crap do you lose a nuclear bomb anyhow, 93 times? Ties in nicely with any possible nuclear threat or potential for such a threat on USA soil. Alarming when you think about it and pretty convenient. Is there a website, is there a reward incentive if you spot one of these things, can you keep it if you find it? 93 TIMES! Hahahah



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 07:44 PM
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Originally posted by GlucoKit1
Apparently there are 92 such cases from over the years. 93 Now, I guess. How the crap do you lose a nuclear bomb anyhow, 93 times? Ties in nicely with any possible nuclear threat or potential for such a threat on USA soil. Alarming when you think about it and pretty convenient. Is there a website, is there a reward incentive if you spot one of these things, can you keep it if you find it? 93 TIMES! Hahahah


Can you cite your source for that '92 such cases'? I'd like to read up on those.

Thanks

- McGrude



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 08:09 PM
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My question is: The USAF looses an H-bomb. They know aproximately where it is. They employ all the means at thier disposal to locate it; and they can't?

So what assurance do we have that the considerably lesser resources of the the Department of Homeland InSecurity and the the local customs agents will ever be able to find a nuclear device they don't about and which has been deliberately hidden from detection?



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 08:11 PM
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I know of TWO right off the top of my head, and my father who was in the USAF for THIRTY YEARS knew of TWO. The B-52 in Spain, and this one. If you say there were 93 of them, put some links up, and show some proof.



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 08:19 PM
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Do you know how long they looked for the one off Spain, before they found it? They knew exactly where the B-52 let it go, exactly where the B-52 crashed, and approximately where it hit the water, and it STILL took months and months until finally someone said "Let's try this." and they got lucky and found it. Once it hits the water, it changes the way it's travelling, and depending on how deep the water was where it went down at, they might not have had a way to look for it until recently, by which time the seafloor has probably changed radically. Not to mention all the coral and everything else probably growing over it now, changing the shape of it on sonar.



posted on Jun, 30 2005 @ 09:56 PM
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Talk about perfect timing. I'm watching a show right now about airborne alerts by SAC. There was an incident in Spain, in Greenland, and off the East Coast


On 21 January, 1968, fire broke out in the B-52 bomber on airborne alert
near Thule. The pilot prepared for an emergency landing at the base.
However the situation deteriorated rapidly, and the crew had to bale
out. There had been no time to communicate with SAC HQ, and the
pilotless plane flew over the Thule base before crashing on the ice 7
miles offshore. Its fuel and the high explosive component of its
nuclear weapons exploded, but there was no nuclear detonation.

coldwar-c4i.net...

After this incident in 1968 all SAC aircraft were ordered to stop flying with nuclear weapons in non-wartime situations. They were only to carry nuclear weapons on ground alert.



posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 01:11 PM
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I concur with Misfit's opinion.

This weapon was found and moved years ago.

It's likely in some redneck Georgia flea market being sold as a 'driftwood' coffee table.



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