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ATS: Air Force Finds No Trace of Lost Nuke

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posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 11:08 PM
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The USAF has concluded that a hydrogen bomb lost of the coast of Georgia is irretrievably lost and poses no danger. The bomb was jettisoned by a B-47 about 15 from Savanna following a mid air collision. The Air Force searched the area again recently following claims by a retired general that high levels of radiation were found in the area.
 



news.yahoo.com
SAVANNAH, Ga. - The first government search in decades for a hydrogen bomb lost off the Georgia coast in 1958 found no trace of the sunken weapon, the Air Force said Friday.

The report — issued nine months after scientists tested radiation levels off Tybee Island — concluded that there is no danger of a nuclear blast from the 7,600-pound bomb and that the weapon should be left where it is, buried somewhere in the muck.

"We still think it's irretrievably lost. We don't know where to look for it," said Billy Mullins, an Air Force nuclear weapons adviser who led the search.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


One has to wonder how many of these weapons have been lost during the cold war and never reported. Davey Joneses locker no doubt hold many of these weapons. The saving grace is it doubtful that anybody could recover the weapons but the troubling revelations about the radiation detected off Tybee island are troubling to say the least. I for one would like to see an independent analysis of the area to confirm the presence or lack of radiation or contamination in the area.




posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 11:30 PM
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This thread has some answers:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

-koji K.



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 11:49 PM
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Originally posted by koji_K
This thread has some answers:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

-koji K.


I recall that thread. Im wonder about the weapons that never made the news.



posted on Jun, 18 2005 @ 02:33 AM
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Humm, now that is a bad idea, the bomb should be found and retrieved. You never know exactly what could happen when the encasing of the bomb is corroded enough by the seawater to release it's contents in the ocean....but I am certain what would happen will not be good at all, at least it won't be good for the people, flora and fauna close to the area where the bomb is at.



posted on Jun, 18 2005 @ 03:07 AM
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I think they should try and find it as well. Anyone who's read Tom Clancy's 'Sum Of All Fears' should well fear this weapon falling into the wrong hands.



posted on Jun, 18 2005 @ 10:27 AM
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should well fear this weapon falling into the wrong hands.


I agree with subz on this one.
It is quite dangerous to leave hydrogen bombs lying around.



posted on Jun, 18 2005 @ 11:01 AM
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Now this is scary. Do nukes actually stay live enough to actually still blow up after all this time? I would have to agree that an independent study may be in order just to be sure. I wonder if there have been many reports of any unusual changes to the fish in that area.



posted on Jun, 18 2005 @ 11:15 AM
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The Nuclear Bomb will not be able to detonate unless it has been primed, which would not have happend however the fact they do not use GPS on all Hydrogen Bombs shocks me. Common sense would mean you did do this? So you could find them if this ever happened. Oh well, give it a few years and I'm sure it'll turn up in somones hands.



posted on Jun, 18 2005 @ 11:22 AM
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Thanks for the info, glad to hear it won't blow. But even after so many years and maybe more years to come, if someone finds it, it still works? Kinda funny to think an American made product actually lasts that long. Too bad that kind of thinking didn't go into our cars.



posted on Jun, 18 2005 @ 12:03 PM
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This is not the middle of the desert of an old war zone that someone could just dig up the bomb. The depths of the ocean require extremely expensive equipment and lots of time for just one trip to scavange only a small area probably less than a square mile. Not to mention that depending on the depth you wouldnt even be able to dive that far without a sub or youd die. I feel safe in the fatc that if the air force and navy could not find this weapon, it is doubtful anyone else with mailcious intents will. This thing was lost in 1958 I don't believe they even had GPS at that time.



posted on Jun, 18 2005 @ 01:42 PM
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After the lengths undergone to locate it, and come up nil ............... maybe someone else already has it (insert Twilight Zone music).

Misfit



posted on Jun, 19 2005 @ 12:18 AM
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Whoops hehe
Next they will misplace a squadron of the new raptors or something.

llama009



posted on Jun, 19 2005 @ 12:26 AM
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Even if they DID use GPS on nukes to track them when they were lost, all of the lost ones were lost during the cold war. LONG before we HAD GPS. There are no aircraft that carry nuclear weapons, or even stand nuclear alert anymore unless there is a major crisis that could potentially involve the use of nukes.



posted on Jun, 19 2005 @ 01:49 AM
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Wow this is really shocking to me. I have a close friend that goes to Tybee Island every summer. I wonder if she has ever heard of this around where she goes.

This is the only case that Im actually GLAD the Us cannot find a Wmd.



posted on Jun, 19 2005 @ 02:06 AM
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I think it was a B-58 Hustler that collided with an F-86 Sabre. The Sabre was lost, the Hustler received permission to drop the bomb out of the bomb bay, due to severe damage to the aircraft. They were eventually able to land safely, but I think the aircraft was a total write off.



posted on Jun, 19 2005 @ 04:08 AM
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I would be more worried about tracking down black market plutonium and red mercury changing hands overseas than I would about this hydrogen bomb. They amount of cost, effort, and reconstruction of this lost hydrogen bomb far exceeds what it would take to buy some off someone dealing in the good old USSR.



posted on Jun, 20 2005 @ 12:41 PM
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Being as it's a hydrogen (thermonuclear fusion) weapon than a fisson bomb, it's even less likely to be useable. In those, the fisson reaction (which needs to be ultra precise to work anyways) starts the bigger explosive and fuses the hydrogen. Any leakage of water at the pressure or depth, any deformation of the casing due to depth, and it'll never go critical.

Worst case is if the casing is breached, perhaps the Octol (or whatever conventional explosive) could detonate-if it's chemically still explosive after all this time at those temperatures. Might be a bit of a radioactive problem but no more than the Soviet navy's scuttled submarine reactors or the leftovers in the deserts of Iraq or Iran.

At least that's my story. Please ignore the large cylindrical "Cold War Relic" I'm selling on eBay. High bidder is some guy named Al, Albert Zarqawi or some such. Followed closely by some guy calling himself "Kim"..weird.



posted on Jun, 20 2005 @ 05:33 PM
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This is just a standard issue statement by the Air Force. With all the money and time invested in this little project and they can't find it? That's a bunch of B/S. If they really wanted it they could get it at anytime that is unless someone got to it before they did; and in today's world that is a fairly accurate statement.



posted on Jun, 20 2005 @ 05:51 PM
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If what you assert is valid, correct, and accurate, FLYIN HIGH, then the Russian's certainly could and should locate and obtain those 'nukes' [ie: suitcase nukes, etc.] that they have misplaced or lost, correct?





seekerof



posted on Jun, 20 2005 @ 09:20 PM
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Once an object hits the water the trajectory changes radically due to current or deflection or both. That's why the USAF had trouble finding the nuke that fell out of a B-52 near Spain after it collided with a KC-135. They looked for a long time, before finding it almost by accident. With all the targets that are likely in the area (shipwrecks, debris, rocks, seamounts etc) they would have to go to every single target that was even remotely close to the size of the weapon, and depending on how deep the sea in that area is, that would be difficult and take a large amount of time and money and resources.



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