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How would you explain/classify waking up automatically?

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posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 10:36 AM
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I was wondering how being able to wake up whenever you want, w/o an alarm clock, could be explained or classified. It seems silly to list it as a paranormal power but if you think about what we're seeing is the ability to go into deep sleep, being unconscious, and waking back up at a particular time. This is unconscious control, somehow. The reason I ask is that I've been doing this for years and recently have been looking for some kind of explanation.

[edit on 17-6-2005 by ktprktpr]




posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 10:41 AM
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I do it too. Must be an internal body clock.



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 10:42 AM
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So what is that? Programming your brain every night?



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 10:50 AM
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Totally know what you mean.

I do this too, I'm still in the last year of school. So when I have school I know to wake up right at an exact time, and wake up then. On weekends know to wake up an hour or two later. I don't wake up and look at the clock, I just know I'm in control. I do this when I need to wake up like at 4AM, I just wake up. No need for an alarm.

I think it's just that, we must be light sleepers. Even when we are asleep and dreaming, we know when to wake up after years of doing so. It's sort of annoying though when your in a good dream, and right at 7AM I just know inside the dream I got to wake up.. and then I pop out of it instantly.

I think it's just a combination of being a light sleeper, and doing the same thing for years over and over.



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 10:53 AM
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I am a sleep tech and this is a pretty standard question.
People that have sleep apnea wake up at the same time pretty often. The reason is that your body has a rhythm to it. REM sleep is a part of that rhythm. Most people that live a 9-5 lifestyle go into REM around 2400-100, 0300-0400, and 0500-0600. When you go into REM sleep your body paralysis the nonessential muscle tissue, and you choke. When your O2 level hits a certain point, your brain wakes you up because it realizes your choking. Therefore I often amaze my patients by telling them, I bet you always wake up around 0300 to go to the bathroom, and you can often wake up before your alarm goes off in the morning, but there is no magic involved, just science and medicine. So I suggest that you tell you DR that you would like to have a Sleep Study done because you suspect you have sleep apnea, and he can hook you right up…

Fixing this will make you be able to remember stuff better, and feel better rested and less tired on a daily basis, besides protecting you from a bunch of other bad stuff that can start to crop up when you don’t get enough REM sleep on a regular basis.

edit to add

Ksnazdnzon

The reason you're waking from a dream is that REM is the stage of sleep in which you dream. So that is 2 strikes for you....




[edit on 6/17/2005 by defcon5]



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 10:58 AM
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Very interesting analysis. I thought you could only have sleep apena if you were overweight though?

In my case, I frequently wake up an hour before classes. And my class times vary (not a whole lot) each semester. Furthermore, whenever there's something important or if i have to wake up earlier to help someone movie, i wake up on time. So this isn't a case of waking up at the same time every year, or waking up at some odd time to go to the bathroom.

How would I be able to tell if if it's a medical condition or if I'm just setting a biological alarm clock?



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 11:02 AM
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While weight adds to the problem, it is not always the issue. I have had rail thin guys have it very severely. It has to do with the tissue inside your airway, and just like your face is different then everyone else’s, so is your airway. It may also have to do with environmental factors throughout your life, such as having ever broken your nose.







[edit on 6/17/2005 by defcon5]



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 11:03 AM
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No. sleep apnea affects all sorts of people, not just overweight people. I have sleep apnea myself, and am not overweight in the least.



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 11:06 AM
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Sorry did not read the rest….
Having apnea will make you sleep more lightly and be more conscious of your surroundings due to the fact that while you think that you are in a cohesive state of sleep, your brain is constantly waking up to a higher level of consciousness.

Do you snore?



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 11:07 AM
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Originally posted by defcon5
edit to add

Ksnazdnzon

The reason you're waking from a dream is that REM is the stage of sleep in which you dream. So that is 2 strikes for you....

[edit on 6/17/2005 by defcon5]



I don't live on a 9-5 basis though.

I sleep pretty randomly and wake up late, but still always wake up at that time. I was just guessing anyways, and it didn't include Magic.


I don't spend the same amount of hours sleeping every night. I also sleep on my side and do not snore.


[edit on 17-6-2005 by Ksnazdnzon]



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 11:11 AM
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Sleeping on your side may relieve your symptoms somewhat, but it over time apnea will stretch the tissue and you will be in the same boat no matter what position you sleep in, even prone. I cannot, nor am I going to try and diagnose you over the net, I am obviously not a doctor, but I would suggest that you go tell one what you told me and get the study done. The worst that is going to happen is you have to wash some gunk out of your hair in the morning, but if you wait you will just make it worse with time…


Edit to add

BTW its not an age issue either, it can happen to anyone any age.

Edit to also add

Ksnazdnzon

If you're still waking up at the same time even though you go to bed random times, that tells me strike 3, you need to go have a study done. That means your circadian rhythm is set to one time and you’re not properly off setting it, so you wake at the same time no matter what.



[edit on 6/17/2005 by defcon5]



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 11:26 AM
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Oh yeah, I'm not even getting into my insomnia either.

I probally should go to some sort of docter.



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 11:38 AM
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Apnea can also be misdiagnosed as insomnia. I cannot even begin to tell you the amount of older people that come to the lab and tell me that they cannot sleep at night. The truth is that 9 times in 10 they have apnea and they bounce back and fourth between stage 1 sleep which is a very light sleep and awake. So while they think that they have stayed awake for hours what has actually happened (and we can prove it to them by showing them their EEG) is that they start to dose off, they have a breathing issue, and wake right back up. So to them they feel like they have stayed awake, but to us we can see that they have had event after event.

I also worked in a lab that did the research trials for several sleeping meds (one starts with Am), and the criterion for subjects was that they had insomnia. The first night they are studied strictly to check if they have apnea, then if they pass that then they can be test pilots…. The washout rate is extremely, extremely high.

Well that makes 4, should we keep on going....



Anyway I have to go to sleep myself so I will check this thread later tonight……






[edit on 6/17/2005 by defcon5]



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 03:16 PM
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Defcon5, I salut you as a defender of science!

I would think not being able to wake on a regular timing would be more unusual than the ladder. However, he is correct in that you should consult a doctor if its that bad. It couldn't hurt either, cept maybe in your wallet.



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 05:30 PM
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I tend to sleep on my stomach and end up breathing out of one nostril. I've never broken my nose, never had asthama, though I premature at birth and they said that i'd have lung problems, etc etc. It's nothing serious, although I suppose i've never got a great nights sleep becaus i always have circles under my eyes.



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 05:43 PM
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Ever heard of PAvlov's dog? It think it may also be conditioning. Where I understand the sleep apnea angle, I think he is getting at the "I go to sleep but somehow always wake up even if my alarm does not go off". Work a job or have a set schedule and you will find that you condition yourself to sleep in patterns. It would be nice if it was magic, but it is just SSDD



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 05:53 PM
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I think it may be something to do with the subconscious and our internal clocks.

I always go to bed at different times and I mean much different like hours apart each night. Sometimes 11 PM or 2:30 am or even 4:15 am but if I need to get up at a certain time I can without an alarm.

For example if I go to bed at 1 AM and need to be up at 6AM I believe I subconsciously send a signal to my brain to be awake in 5 hours and of course my internal clock takes it from there. I never awake on the hour always 10 or 15 minutes before I need to be up.

Now if someone had the ability to awake at an "exact" time like on the exact minute and hour then I would think thats kinda paranormal.



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 06:54 PM
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I appreciate Defcon5's responses on this post. Sleep apnea is a very real, and far more common, occurence than most people are willing to accept, even in the medical community. It is only recently that this condition has been thoroughly studied within the medical community (say, within the past 25 years or so). Sleep Apnea leads to many other medical conditions, the most severe of which is probably Heart Disease/Heart Attack. The effect of Sleep Apnea is essentially that of suffocation. Going without oxygen places a strain on your entire body, and nowhere moreso than on your heart. Your heart is the only organ in your body that cannot ever rest (yes, of course, your brain is always doing something, however people in a coma can still live with their brains doing virtually nothing), and needs a constant oxygen supply to keep it working. The very nature of sleep apnea causes this organ to be starved of the essential oxygen it needs on a semi-regular basis throughout the night, if you have sleep apnea.

However, just as Defcon5 will not presume to diagnose a condition over the internet, neither will I. If you experience ANY of the following symptoms: www.sleep-apnea.ab.ca... (click on the "Who should be suspecting of having it?" link on the left hand side), I would suggest you see a doctor. While sleep apnea may not be the cause, (I feel there is also such thing as an internal body-clock that may regulate these sorts of things, moreso in some people than in others) I feel that if you experience any of the listed symptoms you may be at risk to damaging your heart.

I think the possibility of a higher consciousness function (an internal clock mechanism) is a very real possibility, however it was mentioned that people notice dark circles all the time under their eyes, which is a sign of fatigue, which sleep apnea can contribute to. While I would be interested in a scientific explanation to this higher consciousness or internal clock mechanism, the real possibility of sleep apnea being the cause is too great to ignore. I do not have sleep apnea, however my friend is currently going through the sleep study process. It took a long time for him to be convinced of the possibility, and he finally, reluctantly, decided to have an initial sleep study done. He has yet to take his second sleep study (where they actually prepare the sleep apnea helping 'C-PAP' machine), yet he has seen the results from his initial sleep study. During the study, he did not reach REM sleep one single time.

I recommend, based on my experience with my friend, that if you even remotely feel that any one of the symptoms listed on the above website relate to you, that you seriously consider seeing a doctor. While it is certainly possible that you may not have sleep apnea at all (that would be fantastic for you), the alternative consequences are not worth the risk. This site www.doctorsforadults.com... discusses again the possible symptoms, however also defines the medical problems that can be traced to sleep apnea problems.

So in closing, if you think you might, talk to a doctor.
It may be an enlightening experience, whether you have it or not.

Just want to add, on the second site I listed above, it also lists 4-9% of middle aged males have sleep apnea, however a surprising 80-90% of all sleep apnea goes undiagnosed!

[edit on 6/17/2005 by SimonColynAdrian]



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 07:23 PM
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Could I get sleep apnea in the future even though I don't have it now?



posted on Jun, 17 2005 @ 08:30 PM
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Lanotom's idea seems to be right-on.
Check out this link:
www.straightdope.com...
It discusses how folks awaken just before their alarm goes off, which is a similar situation.

Please note, do NOT quote from this link without the permission of the author!!!







 
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