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A380, sucess or failure...

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posted on Jun, 21 2005 @ 08:43 AM
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Totally agree Waynos, British Airways has always had a weird 'thing' for Boeing and been anti-Airbus since it began.

(......and yes, BA has (as BOAC etc) been instrumental in helping destroy the independant UK aero industry with it's buying tactics.
I have no doubt there is one hell of a story to come out there eventually.)




posted on Jun, 21 2005 @ 11:19 PM
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Originally posted by waynos
The thing about British Airways (and BOAC as it was) is it has had a long standing love affair with Boeing and the only Boeing jet transport .


Thats what makes it interesting. Did they not used to be a governemnt owned flagship type carrier? So is the purchase of the Boeing esp long haul aircraft at the behest of the government?

Just For Kicks Here is the BA Fleet Mix projected for 2006

737 3/4/500 ---24
747-400 --------57
757-200 --------13
767 200/300 ---21
777-200/300---43

A319 ------------36
A320 ------------30
A321 ------------10

Please note however, they have 145 of the Airbus types above on order so plane per plane its similar number with long hual dominated by Boeing.



posted on Jun, 22 2005 @ 08:52 AM
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Originally posted by FredT
Thats what makes it interesting. Did they not used to be a governemnt owned flagship type carrier? So is the purchase of the Boeing esp long haul aircraft at the behest of the government?


- Politics Fred politics.
We suffered the 'cost' of not 'doing' Vietnam with the US and IMO this was just a part of that cost.

It led to a civil and military reliance on a lot of US kit and at a great cost to our own aero industry.

......and I'm sure you don't need reminding about what happens when a certain 'ethos' or method of operation becomes engrained, right?
Several years of working with US and suddenly it seems a hell of a lot easier to carry on working with US.

You'll also find when British Airways was privatised (1987) King et al enormously favoured the Americans over the Europeans......and like Thatcher King was simply 'pro-American' politically.


Please note however, they have 145 of the Airbus types above on order so plane per plane its similar number with long hual dominated by Boeing.


- You must know that the Airbus 'fleet' is a pretty recent addition.....and some as the result of airline acquisition and not a specific sale to BA.

Things have begun to change, it's true, but that change is very recent and pretty slow.
The reflex buy-American culture is still there, no question.

[edit on 22-6-2005 by sminkeypinkey]



posted on Jun, 22 2005 @ 09:03 AM
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Also BA only got to fly the A320 at all because they absorbed the B.Cal fleet when they took them over, there seems to have been a moment of 'hey, these are actually pretty good!' and BA then bough more


edit, sorry sminkey, I see you did point that out already.

[edit on 22-6-2005 by waynos]



posted on Jun, 22 2005 @ 07:58 PM
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Originally posted by waynos
Also BA only got to fly the A320 at all because they absorbed the B.Cal fleet when they took them over, there seems to have been a moment of 'hey, these are actually pretty good!'


Could they have had a prior contract that they had to honor? 132 of the on order Airbus planes are the A320??? B.Cal did not seem to be the kind of carrier that had the wherewithal to commit to that many planes, but I could be wrong????



posted on Jun, 23 2005 @ 03:01 AM
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B.Cal was one of the first customers for the A320, but only for (I think) about 20 of them initially. I don't even think many (if any at all) had gone into service when BA bought them out but BA were forced to continue with the order, it was a good move for Airbus that this was the case as it was probably the only way they were going to break into the BA/Boeing cartel.

Talking of the size of B.Cal, they were the UK's second airline after BA and in the early 80's came close to operating Concorde (by themselves, not like Singapore and Braniff's joint operations with BA) but BA would not part with any planes (B.Cal wanted two).

The merger also left BA with a fleet of DC-10's which they operated alongside their Tristars for a time before gradually retiring them and selling them off. It was expected that BA would do the same with the A320 fleet they inherited too but the plane won them over and for several years now BA has been buying them on their own merit.



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