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SCI/TECH: Found: Lost Suits for Space Spies

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posted on Jun, 3 2005 @ 05:09 PM
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In a long locked room at Cape Canaveral, two security officers discovered two suits for space-spies. The officers had been doing a check of a block that contained a space musuem. The room had been locked for years and the discovery of the blue suits was a big surprise.
 



www.space.com
A recent venture into a long-locked room at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida uncovered artifacts of a by-gone era: spacesuits for Americans who trained in the 1960s to be space spies, reports NASA on its website.
The manufacturer, however, determined that they were MH-7 training suits from a short-lived Cold War-era military program to put a manned reconnaissance station in space.

Established in 1964, the Manned Orbiting Laboratory (MOL) was a U.S.

Air Force initiative that would have sent USAF-selected and trained astronauts to a military- contracted space station in a modified Gemini capsule. After a few weeks in orbit, the crew would undock and return to Earth. The Air Force abandoned the program in 1969, but not before three groups of military officers had trained to be astronauts.

Of the two spacesuits, one labeled as number 008 had the name "LAWYER" on its left sleeve; Lt. Col. Richard Lawyer was a member of the first group recruited to be MOL astronauts in 1965.

Records show that NASA transferred ownership of Lawyer's suit to the
Smithsonian Institution in 1983. It has now been returned to the Smithsonian.

No records were found for the other suit, identified with the spy- appropriate number 007. It still belongs to NASA, and the agency's plans for what to do with the spacesuit are still being determined.



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Thats pretty damned neat. Space Spies. I wonder why the project didn't occur? I find it pretty amazing that these things were sitting around in a locked room, pretty much forgotten or unknown for all those years. Seems like the suits for Space-Spies would be something someone would want to keep track of. Seems like the Smithsonian should've noticed that they never received the suits too, or at least who ever was responsible for getting it to them would've remembered.

[edit on 3-6-2005 by Nygdan]




posted on Jun, 3 2005 @ 05:36 PM
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Finding out about old US spying plans might leave the Russians shaken. But not stirred...



posted on Jun, 3 2005 @ 06:56 PM
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Where is the news in this? Big deal they found some old space suits, nothing more nothing less.

Seems to me that Space com is trying to make more out of the suits then what they were.



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 12:35 AM
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Not some old space suits, but some old space spy suits. Astrospys. They don't need silencers for the PPKs, because in space, there is no sound.



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 02:06 AM
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We are to believe that 2 security officers ventured into a room that no one has entered for 22 years???

Completely forgotten, abandoned, never to be used again, and no other security officers dared ventured into???

And in that room, they found suits labeled "Space Spy - 007". And (since there happened to be 2 security officers) one guy looks at the other and says "I think we outa call the Smithsonian something or another."

And now, thanks to 2 new super heros, we now more about the cold war and space exploration. In 1965, the US did our first "spacewalk" and now we are to believe that was the beginning of "Space Spy".

Of course, there wasn't much in orbit to spy on. But I guess we just wanted the label of being the first "Space Spies" (which we never got because we never sent them).

And, NASA wanted an orbiting Spy Lab, swapping out crews like the ISS, even though they still thought you could get 'coties' in space and had to spend 2 weeks sterilizing yourself upon return to Earth to get rid of those 'coties'.

What a piece of political/NASA propaganda!!!

If NASA has rooms that no one has been into for 20+ years then that is proof of their waste of taxpayers money and incompetency!

EDIT - And let's not forget, these were not going to be covert spies - oh no - special colored suits so every one will know they are spies (and that would be a first in the US spy program - a spy that sticks out from the norm). Imagine the TV coverage (as all manned space launches had back then) as the anchor men tried to explain the blue colored suits! LMAO

And if this isn't funny enough, one of those trained "Space Spies", Richard Truly (who could have been Spy-007), became NASA's administrator from 1986-1992. And not once in those 6 years did he wonder about those years in training and what ever happened to my blue space suit when I was Spy 007? Wouldn't YOU want that space suit as memorabilia???

Yes sir, I see a new ABC prime time TV show in the works.

And you all still want to believe every word that comes from NASA's mouth? And you still want to believe we landed on the moon???


[edit on 6/4/05 by Qwas]



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 02:45 AM
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Originally posted by Nygdan
I wonder why the project didn't occur?


Stop. Think. Assume nothing.



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 05:27 AM
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I find it unusual how a spacespy would use such an obvious number as 007. I also find it unusual that a spacespy would need a number at all. If only two teams were trained, I'm sure each team and their trainers knew each other *quite* well. I am also willing to bet that someone in the Soviet Union had heard of 007 and its "eyes only" classification.

Why design a suit where the "cover" would be blown immediately? The USAF was far from stealth-retardation during the Cold War Era. The fact that they would even put a name and number on the suit leaves little doubt that this is/was a propaganda device.

As such, To The Smithsonian! Let the entire world see our Space Spy attire! Let them see how sociologically and psychologically superior we are by showing off a Cold War super stealth spy uniform!

No wonder it was locked in a room for two decades. I could go on about that aspect, but the uniform in itself is too cute.
Dot.

edited for editing.

[edit on 4-6-2005 by dotgov101]



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 07:59 AM
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Originally posted by Nygdan
Not some old space suits, but some old space spy suits. Astrospys. They don't need silencers for the PPKs, because in space, there is no sound.


It would appear you missed this part where it said


The manufacturer, however, determined that they were MH-7 training suits from a short-lived Cold War-era military program to put a manned reconnaissance station in space.


Does it state spy suits from the MFG? No it does not, it clearly states training suits which could be almost anything.

Also allow me to point out that the Apollo 13 crew clearly heard the tank explode on the way to the moon, so your theory that there is no sound in space logically has to be wrong.




While MOL was designed to give crews a shirtsleeve environment, full-pressure spacesuits would be needed for launch, re-entry & EVA.The military purchased prototype suits from David Clark Co. (DCC) & International Latex Corp. (ILC, now ILC Dover). In 1967, DCC, ILC & Hamilton Standard (HS, now Hamilton Sundstrand) competed for a suit production contract. HS won.The MOL MH-7 Training Suit above is from that contract. HS also won a MOL self-propelled, exclusively EVA suit development contract. USAF Photo.


groups.msn.com...




The above is a picture of the suit in question that already is in a museum, so the existance of the suit was not as highly secret as the article implied.



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 08:05 AM
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Also allow me to point out that the Apollo 13 crew clearly heard the tank explode on the way to the moon, so your theory that there is no sound in space logically has to be wrong.


Sound in the ship, yes, but not in the vacuum of space....



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 08:14 AM
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Originally posted by Gazrok


Also allow me to point out that the Apollo 13 crew clearly heard the tank explode on the way to the moon, so your theory that there is no sound in space logically has to be wrong.


Sound in the ship, yes, but not in the vacuum of space....


I disagree there is sound in space, the human ear just cannot hear it.

What is sound? It is a pressure wave. So long as you have some kind of gaseous medium, you will have the possibility of forming pressure waves in it by 'shocking' it in some way.

In space, the interplanetary medium is a very dilute gas at a density of about 10 atoms per cubic centimeter, and the speed of sound in this medium is about 300 kilometers/sec. Typical disturbances due to solar storms and 'magneto-sonic turbulence' at the earth's magnetopause have scales of hundreds of kilometers, so the acoustic wavelengths are enormous. Human ears would never hear them, but we can technologically detect these pressure changes and play them back for our ears to hear by electronically compressing them.



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by Qwas
And let's not forget, these were not going to be covert spies - oh no - special colored suits so every one will know they are spies (and that would be a first in the US spy program - a spy that sticks out from the norm).


Blue space suits were pretty much the norm. Also, why would it matter? Once they were in space, who would really be able to see what it was they were wearing? Plus keep in mind that the suits were not worn all the time.


Originally posted by dotgov101
I find it unusual how a spacespy would use such an obvious number as 007. I also find it unusual that a spacespy would need a number at all. If only two teams were trained, I'm sure each team and their trainers knew each other *quite* well. I am also willing to bet that someone in the Soviet Union had heard of 007 and its "eyes only" classification.


Why is that such a big deal? Obviously there was a 008, so why not 001-999? The number system was just something to do so that people could identify which suit was thiers. Each was custom tailored to each astronaut, and putting the wrong suit on wouldn't work so well.

Also, only two teams may have been trained back then, but who knows how many more could have been in the works. This is something that could have been planned to be used for decades, hence the need for a lot of numbers.

EDIT: Fixing quotes...

[edit on 6/4/2005 by cmdrkeenkid]



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 08:26 AM
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I disagree there is sound in space, the human ear just cannot hear it.

What is sound? It is a pressure wave. So long as you have some kind of gaseous medium, you will have the possibility of forming pressure waves in it by 'shocking' it in some way.

In space, the interplanetary medium is a very dilute gas at a density of about 10 atoms per cubic centimeter, and the speed of sound in this medium is about 300 kilometers/sec. Typical disturbances due to solar storms and 'magneto-sonic turbulence' at the earth's magnetopause have scales of hundreds of kilometers, so the acoustic wavelengths are enormous. Human ears would never hear them, but we can technologically detect these pressure changes and play them back for our ears to hear by electronically compressing them.


The point of it's original mention is that you (i.e. likely a human) wouldn't hear a weapon in space and it was a tongue-in-cheek comment at that...
That point is still valid, no matter what you throw at it, hehe...



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 04:28 PM
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Originally posted by dotgov101
I find it unusual how a spacespy would use such an obvious number as 007.
[edit on 4-6-2005 by dotgov101]


The number 007 did not have any public recognition way back then. I'm not sure when the first James Bond film came out but it was sometime in the 60's, probably after that number had been assigned to some budding space spy.



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 05:59 PM
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"M: If you carry a 00-number it means you have license to kill, not get killed!"
-Dr. No, 1963

Dot.



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 08:43 PM
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It is kina neat that this info has been revealed. I also would guess that the program was cancelled because it is far cheaper to use robot satalites as oposed to maned craft.
Also it makes me wonder that if this is part of what was found after 20 years is storage, what else might the Gov. have locked away that has been forgoten about?????



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 10:50 PM
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Yea red golem. I think the sucess of the Corenet progect (Photo recon, and recoverable sattilites), and even the U2, there was no percived need for a manned spy space station

Btw, the sound carried in the Apollo 13 module becasue there was atmoshpere INSIDE it, and the expolsion condutive thru the craft. But for an astronaut doing a spacewalk would not be able to hear anything outside of his suit.

Ever see a ringing bell inside a vacume chamber? you cannot hear it.

Personally I would liek to know why these suits needed to be differant then the ones used in the gemini program, and they had to ahve special "SPY SUITS"



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 06:51 PM
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Originally posted by Jehosephat
Yea red golem. I think the sucess of the Corenet progect (Photo recon, and recoverable sattilites), and even the U2, there was no percived need for a manned spy space station

Btw, the sound carried in the Apollo 13 module becasue there was atmoshpere INSIDE it, and the expolsion condutive thru the craft. But for an astronaut doing a spacewalk would not be able to hear anything outside of his suit.

Ever see a ringing bell inside a vacume chamber? you cannot hear it.

Personally I would liek to know why these suits needed to be differant then the ones used in the gemini program, and they had to ahve special "SPY SUITS"



Well you know how the Gov. works. The Air Force tosses its hat in the ring with space flights and its not good enuff to use the same suits as NASA, so they half to lobby for a bazillion in funding so they can have there own space suite.




posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 08:08 PM
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What kind of space spy program would it be if some Air force generals ask Nasa to produce some space suits for them that allow the wearer to stay in space for several days

The US Air force had other uses for space suits, like the X-plane projects, high altitude ejection experiments, and even the U2. That they should have been able to control thier own production indepentant of a Civilan orginization like NASA



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 08:57 PM
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Originally posted by shots
I disagree there is sound in space, the human ear just cannot hear it.

What is sound? It is a pressure wave. So long as you have some kind of gaseous medium, you will have the possibility of forming pressure waves in it by 'shocking' it in some way.

In space, the interplanetary medium is a very dilute gas at a density of about 10 atoms per cubic centimeter, and the speed of sound in this medium is about 300 kilometers/sec. Typical disturbances due to solar storms and 'magneto-sonic turbulence' at the earth's magnetopause have scales of hundreds of kilometers, so the acoustic wavelengths are enormous. Human ears would never hear them, but we can technologically detect these pressure changes and play them back for our ears to hear by electronically compressing them.



Nice reply shots. Short, sweet, technical and to the point. Unfortunately, it is blatant plagiarism from this site:

www.astronomycafe.net...



posted on Jun, 7 2005 @ 10:52 AM
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Originally posted by dotgov101 The fact that they would even put a name and number on the suit leaves little doubt that this is/was a propaganda device.

As such, To The Smithsonian! Let the entire world see our Space Spy attire! Let them see how sociologically and psychologically superior we are by showing off a Cold War super stealth spy uniform!

Thats a pretty good point. Would certainly be clever. Tho the idea of a manned space station used to make observations of movements on earth seems plausible too, especially at an early stage where automated satellites maybe weren't considered reliable.


but the uniform in itself is too cute.

Maybe in another decade a ninja version will pop up.

Space Ninjas.



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