It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The US Dept of State, Misinformation and You! (How You Too Can Spot a Conspiracy Theory)

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 3 2005 @ 01:00 PM
link   
NEW! From the makers of I Can't Believe It's not Yellow Cake!


Comes... I Can't Believe It's Not Depleted Uranium Spray!!!

How To Identify Misinformation
Produced by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of International Information Programs
You Are In: USINFO > Resource Tools > Identifying Misinformation


How can a journalist or a news consumer tell if a story is true or false? There are no exact rules, but the following clues may help indicate if a story or allegation is true.

First, does the story claim that vast, powerful, evil forces are secretly manipulating events? If so, this fits the profile of a conspiracy theory, which is rarely true, even though such theories have great appeal and are often widely believed. In reality, events usually have much less exciting explanations.

Second, is the story startlingly good, bad, amazing, horrifying, or otherwise seemingly “too good” or “too terrible” to be true? If so, it may be an “urban legend.” Urban legends, which often circulate by word of mouth, e-mail, or the Internet, are false claims that are widely believed because they put a common fear, hope, suspicion, or other emotion into story form.

For example, after the September 11 attacks, a story arose that someone had survived the World Trade Center collapse by “surfing” a piece of concrete from the 80th floor to the ground. Nothing so extraordinary occurred, but many initially believed this, out of desperate hope that some people trapped in the towers miraculously survived their collapse.

Third, be aware of widely repeated allegations that are false, but which many continue to believe. The AIDS virus was not invented in a laboratory. Americans do not adopt children from other countries to use them in organ transplants. Likewise, there are many exaggerated fears about depleted uranium, probably because people mistakenly associate it with weapons-grade uranium or fuel-grade uranium, which are much more dangerous substances.

Fourth, consider the source. Conspiracy theorists often circulate false or skewed information. Ideological extremists frequently spread false stories.

Fifth, research the claim further and, if you wish, ask us. We can’t respond to all requests for information, but if a request is reasonable and we have the time, we will do our best to provide accurate, authoritative information.


Well, I for one am glad that's settled. Somebody get the lights, I'll lock up.


[edit on 3-6-2005 by RANT]




posted on Jun, 3 2005 @ 01:11 PM
link   
Well, I thought the article was good to go.



is the story startlingly good, bad, amazing, horrifying, or otherwise seemingly “too good” or “too terrible” to be true?

Hmm, something to think about. If a story fits into this caregory and it can only be found on one extremely bias website...then it is probably not true and or exaggerated.

How did you find that article? Random find while searching the web?



posted on Jun, 3 2005 @ 01:17 PM
link   
pretty good article, able to help us remind ourselves to see the whole story and to look into it more carefully before accepting and not just accept wat is there.

also, hey Sporty do u post yer signature on Syrian Sister each day, i mean different quotes from her?



posted on Jun, 3 2005 @ 01:20 PM
link   

Originally posted by SportyMB
Well, I thought the article was good to go.


And on sooooooooo many levels.

"Ideological extremists frequently spread false stories."


Please access your database, see irony, subheading Humor (subtle forms of).



How did you find that article? Random find while searching the web?


No, the government provides a handy link to spam all your friends in the event of a conspiracy theory outbreak.



posted on Jun, 3 2005 @ 01:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by deltaboy
pretty good article, able to help us remind ourselves to see the whole story and to look into it more carefully before accepting and not just accept wat is there.

also, hey Sporty do u post yer signature on Syrian Sister each day, i mean different quotes from her?


Good points
Many people believe the left and right websites to be undeniable truth without even searching other sources and sites with the same story. Im mentioning websites becasue on the internet, often websites are the only proof we have to show others.

And yes DB, everyday I try to find a quote from SS to use as my signature (they're easy to find...just read any of her post) but I like the one I have now, so Ill keep it for awhile.



posted on Jun, 3 2005 @ 01:34 PM
link   


No, the government provides a handy link to spam all your friends in the event of a conspiracy theory outbreak.

Yeah the Gov put the article there in hopes that people will not believe many Consp. theories and stuff like that.

Im just saying the part about stories being “too good” or “too terrible” has some truth to it.

Don't belive things just cause they are on your favorite website.....look it up yourself if it seems “too good” or “too terrible”. Makes sense.



posted on Jun, 3 2005 @ 03:52 PM
link   
OOOO OOOO I think I found one!!

&garden=&minisite=]Bush: Social Security in 'crisis' now
CBS News, Dec 20, 2004

Or this one....

Christianity Under Attack From Far Leftists
Charlotte Observer, Jan 1, 2005

or THIS!

Michael Jackson Formally Charged in Molestation Case
CNN--Dec 18, 2003

err.. that one might be true....



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 11:04 AM
link   
The successful Conspiracy always plans for damage control before the operation begins. Using some of the tricks of professional stage magicians, large amounts of misdirection are supplied to newshounds and citizens with an "abnormal" desire to learn the truth.

Lately, it's been found that the very public being deluded can be used to help muddy the waters. For example, a few rumors about a "man on the grassy knoll" are slipped into the dialogue, and then hundreds of people, working without pay I might add, begin to throw off such a huge amount of disinfo that the tracks become very obscured. Or take the "Area 51" matter. And for the purposes of the Conspiracy, the nuttier, the more ignorant, the more diagnosed schizophrenics involved, the better. This is such a HUGE assist to those hoping to discredit those with actual logical reasons for seeing the true signs of the Conspiracy.

The 9-11 hologram and UFO people. Maybe the remote-control people. Maybe the "jet fuel cannot melt steel and collapse buildings" people.

Provide (let the people provide) enough disinfo, the more sincere the better, that can be debunked, and the serious will also be rendered irrelevant.

It's easy. Like taking candy from a baby.




top topics



 
0

log in

join