It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Did we steal NASA?

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 1 2005 @ 02:05 PM
link   
There is something called "Operation Paperclip" that most people may not be familiar with. After Germany fell in WWII, Americans and Soviets were in one of the biggest spy war ever, although they would never admit it publically. Anyway, Operation Paperclip was a secret covert operation to go into Germany and steal as much engineering secrets as they could, undetected. But the Soviets were onto the same idea. Everyone knew that the German were far superior in Engineering than any other country (it's a good thing Hitler didn't realize this earlier). Well operation paperclip brought over 1,600 scientist and all their secrets, incuding Vohn Braun, who brought over the V2 rocket that started our space program, with all the scientist that were abducted. The only bad problem was that the Soviets stole just as much crap as we did, thus igniting the cld war and the space race.




posted on Jun, 1 2005 @ 02:26 PM
link   
Most of this actually applied to a brain grab, AFTER the war, though some were enticed prior to it...(Einstein for example).

Interesting that this sudden ability didn't seem to exist prior or since within the German populace (at least as compared to any other industrialized nation)...no?

Then again, maybe they actually DID recover a crashed ET craft in the Black Forest in 1936?


If I recall correctly, Paperclip is more about repatriating them here in America than getting them prior to the end of the war. Only we conspiracy nuts will be familiar with Paperclip though, so a good thing to bring up....



posted on Jun, 1 2005 @ 02:33 PM
link   
I had never heard of Operation Paperclip till now. Thanks for bringing it up. To those who want more information here is a website to visit.
www.conspiracyarchive.com...

I think it was wise move to use the scienctist. I wonder if we didn't use the scientist and another country did, if they would be as technological as we are today, defense wise.


[edit on 1-6-2005 by alias101]



posted on Jun, 1 2005 @ 02:37 PM
link   
About.com has an interesting biography of Werner von Braun, which mentions that he had arranged for himself and his scientists to go to the US.



Wernher von Braun (1912-1977)

By the beginning of 1945, it was obvious to von Braun that Germany would not achieve victory against the Allies, and he began planning for the postwar era. Before the Allied capture of the V-2 rocket complex, von Braun engineered the surrender of 500 of his top rocket scientists, along with plans and test vehicles, to the Americans. For fifteen years after World War II, von Braun would work with the United States army in the development of ballistic missiles. As part of a military operation called Project Paperclip, he and his rocket team were scooped up from defeated Germany and sent to America where they were installed at Fort Bliss, Texas. There they worked on rockets for the United States army, launching them at White Sands Proving Ground, New Mexico.



posted on Jun, 1 2005 @ 02:59 PM
link   
It's hard to say that we stole NASA, as it was NACA until 1958. As the government that was pursuing better ways to deliver HE warheads was no longer in existence, from what government it did steal?

I know, I wasn't supposed to be this literal; it is just my nature. Sorry.



posted on Jun, 1 2005 @ 05:09 PM
link   
I would hardly say USA stole NASA. I'd say that after the war, the great minds were looking for jobs in a broken country [after the war, Germany was a wreck], so they went to USA, Russia etc...



posted on Jun, 1 2005 @ 05:39 PM
link   
Von Braun only surrendered to the Americans once it became clear Germany was going to lose and he was likely going to face War Crimes charges from the British or just get buggered by the Russians. He did to save his own arse.

He used "untermenchen" as slaves in the rocket complexes and thought nothing of it. Many hundreds died producing his weapons, whilst he was doing to boost his own ego.

A brilliant scientist, but an utter bastard at the same time.



posted on Jun, 1 2005 @ 05:42 PM
link   
we didnt still NASA, it came to us
in anicase it helped us stay with the Soviets and reach the stars (moon i meant)
. it helped us get more information about Mars so i dont really care if we "stole it".



posted on Jun, 2 2005 @ 11:06 AM
link   
Robert was the father of rocketry. Wernher Von Braun was only following Goddard's research and patents. Read url:

www.time.com...

Dr. Wernher Von Braun would probably have taken a seat in second position if Robert Goddard had not passed away so soon after WWII. The V2 rocket was a copy of Goddard's invention. I do not mean to take a thing from Dr. Wernher Von Braun. Just simply stating historical facts.

NASA was a fabrication of the USA to somewhat peacefully explore areas outside our atmosphere known as space. However, NASA does accomplish classified military projects in space. I know landing on the moon is supposedly the biggest accomplishment NASA has ever achieved. Personally, I think the Hubble Telescope and repair of the Hubble to be the biggest.

The moon walk just gave the USA cudos over the Russian space program since they beat the USA to orbit with Sputnik and stayed ahead or even until the walk. I hope to see much more global collaboration between all countries in the future. Where would the space station be without the aid of the Russian rocket right now? The USA needs a re-entry vehicle design better that the shuttle. The shuttle is good but has been plagued with design SNAFUS from the getgo.

Steal NASA? I don't think so. The NAZIs were strickly using the Goddard design for military plunder of their enemies. The NAZIs had no intentions of peaceful usage when it came to rocket technology.



posted on Jun, 2 2005 @ 01:02 PM
link   

Originally posted by Josekinuc
Robert was the father of rocketry. Wernher Von Braun was only following Goddard's research and patents. Read url:

www.time.com...

Dr. Wernher Von Braun would probably have taken a seat in second position if Robert Goddard had not passed away so soon after WWII. The V2 rocket was a copy of Goddard's invention. I do not mean to take a thing from Dr. Wernher Von Braun. Just simply stating historical facts.


That was an interesting read.
It does seem as though he beat the Germans by a couple of years.

Here's a piece on a German scientist who Braun worked with:



en.wikipedia.org...

In 1922, his doctoral dissertation on rocket science was rejected as "utopian". He had the 92-page work privately published as the controversial Die Rakete zu den Planetenräumen (By Rocket into Planetary Space). (In 1929, Oberth would expand this to a 429-page work entitled Wege zur Raumschiffahrt or Ways to Spaceflight.) Oberth commented later that he made the deliberate choice not to write another doctoral dissertation: "I refrained from writing another one, thinking to myself: Never mind, I will prove that I am able to become a greater scientist than some of you, even without the title of doctor." [1] (www.kiosek.com...) Oberth criticized the German system of education, saying "Our educational system is like an automobile which has strong rear lights, brightly illuminating the past. But looking forward things are barely discernible." [2] (www.kiosek.com...)

He became a member of the Verein für Raumschiffahrt (VfR - "Spaceflight Society"), an amateur rocket group that had taken great inspiration from his book and acted as something of a mentor to the enthusiasts that made it up.

In 1928 and 1929 Oberth worked in Berlin as scientific consultant on the first film ever to have scenes set in space, Frau im Mond (The Woman in the Moon), directed at UFA-Film Co. by Fritz Lang. The film was of enormous value in popularizing the idea of rocket science. Oberth lost the sight in his left eye in an experiment for this film.

In autumn 1929, Oberth launched his first liquid fuel rocket, named Kegeldüse. He was helped in this experiment by his students at the Technical University of Berlin, one of whom was Wernher von Braun, who would later head the wartime project to develop the rocket officially called the A4, but far better known today as the V-2, 45 feet long, liquid-fuelled, with a one-ton warhead, capable of supersonic speed, and with an azimuth of over 50 miles. Although Oberth did not play a large direct role in that project, it incorporated many of his inventions and ideas.


Here's some information on two other scientists involved in rocket science and space travel:
en.wikipedia.org...
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jun, 2 2005 @ 10:43 PM
link   
Well we did steal the jet engine... Germans were the only ones to have any kind of rocketry research done and employed when the war ended. Everyone else was still using really big cannons and balloons



posted on Jun, 2 2005 @ 11:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by tigerjr
Well we did steal the jet engine... Germans were the only ones to have any kind of rocketry research done and employed when the war ended. Everyone else was still using really big cannons and balloons


I don't think you stole the jet engine.
The first jet plane (as we know it) was built and flown by the Germans in 1939 but a Brit named Frank Whittle designed the engine before that. Any use of his design was done with consent and cooperation from the British.



posted on Jun, 7 2005 @ 07:20 PM
link   
after looking that up, I can actually accept that. Germans were, as stated before some of the best engineers in the world... they were first and foremost in rocketry (hence the V1, V2 rockets), their amazing secret airplane development and implementation, and the many scientific achievements that were made by Germans (i.e. the Atom Bomb).




top topics



 
0

log in

join