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Many Quotes written by High Level Masons proclaiming Lucifer as God

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posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 02:28 PM
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*****You have just voted for senrak for the longest post of the year award***

Sorry I couldn't resist
)

But well worth it, great info


And as far as a "Masonic Box" isn't that one of those things that you crank the side handle and it pops open to reveal the secrets of Masonry




posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 03:18 PM
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A copy of M&D Used to be given to all masons after the completion of the fourteenth degree, now it has been replaced by another book. Something titied, building a bridge to light, or something. Can anyone gove me some information about the author of this new "prolific" text of the masonic ages. And maybe a little about the book as a whole.

My question to the masons that may have reviewed bot of the texts, is what are the similarites of the books. Are they similar in nature or completely different.

Also found great essay entitled "Venus, the Devil, Jack Chick and the Freemasons"

www4.vc-net.ne.jp...

And some more about albert pike's M&D, here...

www.masonicinfo.com...


Today, some Masons will diminish Pike's importance so as to deflect the charges of anti-Masons. There is no doubt, though, that he was among the most influential Masons of his time. It must be also remembered that this was a time when communications even with surrounding states was severely limited and travel from place to place took days. Pike wrote Morals and Dogma some eight years before Alexander Graham Bell transmitted the first wireless telephone message!



Morals and Dogma is a philosophical work, created by an individual who was an extraordinarily prolific writer even for an age when prolific writing was the norm. It was also fashioned in the style of Pike's time when public speaking was a high art form and Pike was known far and wide for his skills in this area. Morals and Dogma is not a manifesto (i.e. public declaration of principles, policies, or intentions) for Masonry or even for the Scottish Rite's Southern Masonic Jurisdiction. It is, rather, an attempt by Pike to provide a framework for understanding religions and philosophies of the past. Pike believed that without understanding the history of a concept, one couldn't grasp the concept itself - and thus his lengthy explanations of various religious beliefs (consistent with knowledge of those beliefs in the mid-1800s).


If you still think pike is a satnist after reading this, then I guess there is nothing I can do for you.




[edit on 4-6-2005 by Eyeofhorus]



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 04:34 PM
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Originally posted by Golfie
And as far as a "Masonic Box" isn't that one of those things that you crank the side handle and it pops open to reveal the secrets of Masonry


I thought it was similar to what you desribed... but I was under the impression that it was just a music box that played tunes to which Masonic Monkeys do their thing.


Oh, and BTW:



You have voted senrak for the Way Above Top Secret award. You have two more votes this month.


Excellent work, my friend.

Now if people would just read and digest what has been presented there, it might do us all some good.



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 06:33 PM
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Ok after reading through this thread and reading numerous biblical quotes I noticed one that has been left out.

I think EyeOfHorus was going along this path also.....


from www.bible.com
Rev. 22-16
I Jesus have sent mine angel to testify unto you these things in the churches. I am the root and the offspring of David, and the bright and morning star.


Soo with that being said, Jesus himself claims to be the morning star.

And that opinion is not alone....

biblicalresearch.gc.adventist.org...


from provided link
Christ is the only one who can now truly claim the title “bright and morning star” (Rev. 22:16). We look forward to the moment when our morning star will appear to bring us salvation (cf. 2 Peter 1:19)


And since it the latin meaning of Lucifer is "light bearer, morning star" well you get the picture....I'll leave it up to you do make your own conclusions.....

Another site along the same lines.....

www.lds-mormon.com...



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 07:35 PM
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Originally posted by Eyeofhorus
A copy of M&D Used to be given to all masons after the completion of the fourteenth degree, now it has been replaced by another book. Something titied, building a bridge to light, or something. Can anyone gove me some information about the author of this new "prolific" text of the masonic ages. And maybe a little about the book as a whole.


"A Bridge to Light" was compiled by a friend of mine, Rex R. Hutchens, who's a 33rd Degree Mason in Arizona. It's more "abridged" than Morals & Dogma and written in a much easier to understand language (Pike got a bit carried away at times)

I personally LIKE the book,but to my new Scottish Rite Brothers I sill recommend the reading of Morals & Dogma.

Here's some info from the book itself. This book (like Morals & Dogma) can be purchased by ANYONE from the Supreme Council, Southern Jurisdiction from their website.

-Senrak

A BRIDGE TO LIGHT
by
Rex Hutchens

C. FRED KLEINKNECHT, 33d Sovereign Grand Commander

FOREWORD

The Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite is above all
else an educational institution. Throughout its history
it has stood as a beacon on the shores of ignorance.
Instruction about the great ideals of morality,
philosophy, religion and philanthropy permeates our
ritual and our writings, unencumbered by sectarian
doctrine.

We have sought, not to teach men the truth, but rather
a way to the truth. Each must find it for himself. We
seek only to be a guide--teaching the common ground of
various philosophical and religious approaches to
belief in order that men might be more united in their
standards of right and wrong and their understanding of
the reality of God.

The apex of our teachings has been the rituals of our
degrees and Morals and Dogma, written by our beloved
Sovereign Grand Commander Albert Pike. The latter, once
widely read, has become less so today. The Bible as
well is less widely read than in his time. Many factors
have conspired to bring about this condition, but chief
among them has been a shift in educational priorities
in America, particularly after World War 11 as the
teaching of science and technology began to overshadow
the humanities. Neither Greek nor Latin is commonly
taught in our high schools, and instruction on
classical mythology is virtually nonexistent. Thus many
come to Morals and Dogma sadly deficient in the
foundation Pike rightly expected his readers to have.

A Bridge to Light seeks to overcome this difficulty by
presenting passages from Morals and Dogma which best
reinforce the teachings of the rituals of the degrees.
It is hoped that these degree summaries and the
accompanying citations from Morals and Dogma will
encourage our members to investigate more fully the
profound teachings of the Rite and learn how to apply
them in their daily lives. A lesson learned, but not
practiced, is not learned at all.

Our ritual both instructs and affirms: it teaches our
new members what might be expected of them in matters
of demeanour and, through our Reunions, affirms the
bonds of brotherhood which unite us.

Ritual is the very soul of the Scottish Rite and its
proper presentation is an imperative. Thus is this work
presented--to inform, guide and remind us of our duties
and responsibilities to ourselves and the world at
large.

I believe that the publication of this work could truly
be the dawning of a new day in our Jurisdiction.
C. Fred Kleinknecht, 33d
Sovereign Grand Commander


PREFACE

This work was prepared using the published rituals of
the degrees as written by Albert Pike and occasionally
revised by the Committee on Rituals and Ceremonial
Forms of the Supreme Council. It incorporates those
allowable additions in the rubrics that have from time
to time been published.

The author and the members of the Committee recognize
that certain Valleys may be physically and/or
financially unable to present the rituals in their
complete form. These degree summaries are presented as
a guide only; their intent is to assist the members of
the Rite in understanding the lessons of the degrees
and the meaning of the symbols employed in the
presentation of those lessons. It is only expected that
the Valleys will do the best possible job of presenting
the degrees within the limits of their situation. We
hope the brethren will avail themselves of the
information in these summaries to increase their
understanding of the degrees. Unless otherwise noted,
all page references are to Morals and Dogma.

Rex R. Hutchens
Tucson, Arizona
1988



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 10:39 PM
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Originally posted by senrak


"A Bridge to Light" was compiled by a friend of mine...


Senrak, first of all, thanks and secondly, would you recommend reading it after Pike's book, in order to draw parallels between the two? In hopes of further understanding of the philosophy within? I have read a lot of philosophy, and ancient works, so the wording Pike uses doesn't really bother me, because I know the background of most of the philosophy he reconstructs. Would it still be beneficial to read this text after M&D, and Is it still a philosophical text?

And good point, Golfie, I totally agree. These people, who claim Pike was a satanist, obviously have no idea what is meant by "the morning star" and the symbolism it carries. Does this also mean that jesus was Lucifer? I highly doubt that anyone will go for that idea...

There is much confusion surrounding Pike's book, because it goes way over most people's heads. Those people who are not well versed in ancient and arcane language, as well as political, religious and natural philosophy, will NOT understand this book. Period.


fromwww.masonicinfo.com...
If one were to estimate, the numbers would likely be as follows:

Out of the next 100 men who join Masonry world-wide, less than 10 will obtain (either through purchase or from a library) Pike's Morals and Dogma.
Out of those 10, perhaps 8 will actually pick it up to read. (Others will have received it as a gift from a relative or mentor - and simply aren't interested.)
Out of those 8, perhaps 3 will actually finish reading it. (It is, after all, over 900 pages long and has an index of over 200 pages. When's the last time YOU read a book with over 1,100 pages???)
Out of the 3 who actually finish, perhaps one will feel he understands it!

It is a massive book and is certainly not 'light reading'!

And we suspect that precious few anti-Masons have ever really read the book - but are not at all hesitant about quoting passages they've found (or have been pointed toward).


Hopfully people will stop quoting this book, because they don't understand it. I'd say I have a mediocre grasp on Pike's texts. And it has taken me years of studying philosophy, a year of latin language class, and months of focusing on studying the background of Pike's text, and the proper way to read it. Even then, certain words have different meanings...words we use everyday that are used in this text, have arcane meanings, and finding the true meanings of some words proves very difficult. The only thing these conspirators know about the book, is how to open it and look for words they think they recognize...

[edit on 4-6-2005 by Eyeofhorus]



posted on Jun, 4 2005 @ 10:39 PM
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Originally posted by Golfie
And since it the latin meaning of Lucifer is "light bearer, morning star" well you get the picture....I'll leave it up to you do make your own conclusions.....


Golfie, that is an excellent conclusion, my brother! If only every anti who has ever made a charge against Pike for the Lucifer quote would actually READ this, and realize that Pike was an extremely devout man, maybe the absurd conversations based on bad assumptions would end.

Fat chance, huh? :bnghd:



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 02:31 AM
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Originally posted by eudaimonia

Your so funny. I'm glad you find this subject matter humorous, keep it up.


Sorcery, Hexes, they're all intertwined in the workings of Witchcraft.


Are you implying that Sorcery is a 100% POSITIVE practice?


No. But niether is your Christ-Insanity religon either. Its been responsible for some of the worlds greatest evils.

And I happen to be Pagan, with Wiccan leanings, you, like 90% of Christians I have met, are ever so ignorant of our faith, practices, and beliefs.

I happen to know for a fact a hexagram is not "the most evil symbol in Witchcraft, used to plant curses on people". What ignorant tripe. I have never cast a curse on anyone. The karmic backlash makes the practice almost entirely unpalatable. The hexagram is the joining of two trinities, the male and female trinities. Its a neutral symbol, like all symbols arcane. It matters who uses the symbol and for what purpose. Im sure, if you knew certain rites, you probably could curse someone with a hexagram. But that is not its only use. Are you saying some 20 million Jews world wide worship Satan and curse people? Give it up.

I do find your ramblings funny, because you have to be one of the most ignorant guillable people Ive ever seen. Your sources are basically sites written by paranoid Christians in tin foil caps. Its people like you, who see evil in everything beyond the church, was what drove me away from your silly religon in the first place.

Its your ramblings and falsehoods and paranoid fanaticism that turns alot of people off about your religon.

By the way, in case you havent heard, Lucifer wasn't even part of your beloved pantheon of middle eastern tribal bearded celestial twats. Lucifer was an Etruscan diety, a Solar god, whose name was later added to your much doctored and cut and paste holy book, the bible.

I dont care if you want to bash Freemasonry and Witchcraft, just get your facts straight, because otherwise, you look like an utter fool.



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 03:37 AM
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I too used to be of a Pagan faith, now I am a struggling agnostic. Slowly but surely I am starting to believe again.

After reading Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft (good book for beginners into the Pagan faith) it told me of how the New Religion bastardized the Old Religion and forced mass conversion on its followers. It really is an interesting story. I wouldn't call Christians ignorant, just very misinformed.



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 03:43 AM
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Originally posted by Majestic12

After reading Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft (good book for beginners into the Pagan faith) it told me of how the New Religion bastardized the Old Religion and forced mass conversion on its followers. It really is an interesting story. I wouldn't call Christians ignorant, just very misinformed.


Constantine's new religion for the ages...Had to appeal to christians and pagans alike. I'd say they're more than misinformed, they don't even know what they are worshipping.

I'm gonna catch some heat for this one you watch.



[edit on 5-6-2005 by Eyeofhorus]



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 06:25 AM
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Originally posted by Skadi_the_Evil_Elf

Originally posted by eudaimonia

Your so funny. I'm glad you find this subject matter humorous, keep it up.


Sorcery, Hexes, they're all intertwined in the workings of Witchcraft.


Are you implying that Sorcery is a 100% POSITIVE practice?


No. But niether is your Christ-Insanity religon either. Its been responsible for some of the worlds greatest evils.


You're acting like a fool making such comments.
Let's not AGAIN go on the "let's blame christianity for humanities evilness" tour again, your intelligence is high enough for you to come to other conclusions than that.

Now what about the supposed KKK membership of Pike?
Is that a fairytale as well?

(I am not saying Pike was not a satanist, as I have not seen any real proof to debunk it yet, just some "morning star" wordgames)



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 06:32 AM
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Originally posted by Majestic12
After reading Buckland's Complete Book of Witchcraft (good book for beginners into the Pagan faith) it told me of how the New Religion bastardized the Old Religion and forced mass conversion on its followers. It really is an interesting story. I wouldn't call Christians ignorant, just very misinformed.


Oh really.
I wouldn't call pagans ignorant, just deceived by demons and misinformed to the point where they can lose their soul doing what they are doing, but are that kind of comments going to change your mind?




posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 07:10 AM
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Originally posted by Eyeofhorus

Originally posted by senrak


"A Bridge to Light" was compiled by a friend of mine...


Senrak, first of all, thanks and secondly, would you recommend reading it after Pike's book, in order to draw parallels between the two? In hopes of further understanding of the philosophy within? I have read a lot of philosophy, and ancient works, so the wording Pike uses doesn't really bother me, because I know the background of most of the philosophy he reconstructs. Would it still be beneficial to read this text after M&D, and Is it still a philosophical text?


A Bridge To Light is not truly a "philosophical text" like Morals & Dogma. It deals with a bit of philosophy, but it's geared more directly and succintly to the degrees of the Scottish Rite (Southern Jurisdiction) I emphasize that because, although an interesting read for members of perhaps the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, it does NOT reflect the teachings of all the degrees of their Scottish Rite.

Morals & Dogma was intended as a lecture/study book for recipients of the Southern Jurisdiction's degrees...and in my opinion, it's literally PACKED full of teachings because Pike believed that "more is better"


In most of the Masonic bodies (groups) the individual member is given or can purchase a copy of the ritual of the degrees (whether it be in "cipher" or in plain text...depending on the group) In the Scottish Rite however individual members may NOT own a ritual of any of the degrees. Monitors of the 4th - 30th Degree of the Southern Jurisdiction were once printed (called "Liturgy" and still available for purchase by anyone from the Southern Jurisdictions web-site) but Pike never got around to making a liturgy for the 31st & 32nd Degree and the other books are out of print. On top of all that a member had to have 3 books to read about the degrees, so "A Bridge To Light" is more of a "Monitor" in some ways of the 4th - 32nd Degrees.

Also, since not every degree is given every time (except by title in most cases) it serves to allow the new member to understand what each degree teaches.

Rex Hutchens is an EXCELLENT and very respected Masonic writer from the Southern Jurisdiction, as is S. Brent Morris. I highly recommend reading anything either of them have written. "Pillars of Wisdom" is another excellent one in this same area.

Regards



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 07:26 AM
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Originally posted by Jakko
Now what about the supposed KKK membership of Pike?
Is that a fairytale as well?



Jakko,

"Supposed" is the operative word in your question. Pike's membership cannot be proven. Pike's membership cannot be DISproven.
MANY prominent Southern men were members of the original Klan, an organization that was started to protect the South from the basic "raping and pillaging" of carpet-baggers...it was NOT the racist group that it became in the 1920's (20+ years after Pike died) It's important to note too that the so-called "Second Klan" (the racist, hate-group of the 20's) was more powerful in Indiana than in the South. But all that aside, here's some information about Pike and the Ku Klux Klan.
-Senrak


One of the more common tactics of deceit used by anti-Masons is the charge that Albert Pike - known for his leadership in the late 1800's of Scottish Rite Masonry in the Southern (US) Jurisdiction - founded or was a founder of the Ku Klux Klan.

What they fail to mention, however, is that the Klan began in 1866-7 and was "founded" by 6 young men, veterans of the Confederate cause, but whose motives were unclear: whether it was some kind of racist joke or a true racist group. In 1869, Grand Wizard Nathan B. Forrest* disbanded the organization because it had become uncontrollable. It wasn't until 1915 (well after Pike's death in 1891) that the Klan in its second form reappeared. That group was bankrupted by the U. S. Government in the 1940s and the racist group which exists today has only the connection of a name similarity to the original group.

Many anti-Masons also ignore the fact that Pike was so well respected by the United States that a major statue of him sits in Judiciary Square in Washington, DC today. Although he, like so many other Confederate military officers, was initially charged with Treason, those charges were dropped and today, his statue is the only one of a Confederate General in Washington! (Some, of course, will use this fact as fodder for their belief in the 'Great Masonic Conspiracy' theory....)

After the Civil War, the United States remained philosophically divided. Those who fought on the Confederate side felt wronged and betrayed. Despite the actions of the Union toward reconciliation, they were disenfranchised and angry. Many organizations such as the KKK were founded in the South at this time and many prominent citizens chose membership. To single out Pike for this is not only silly but ignorant of the circumstances of history.

It is also interesting to note that there is no mention of Pike whatsoever in the various contemporaneous Congressional hearings - a fact that seems highly peculiar if there was any suspicion at all that Pike might have been the Klan's Chief Judicial Officer as some have claimed.

Particularly in light of Pike's extensive work with and support of the American Indian (another group which engendered strong feelings of hate at that time), it is false to claim that Pike would be involved in the subjugation of ANY person.

Suffice it to say: when the Ku Klux Klan appeared in its present form, Albert Pike had been dead for some 24 years!

An excellent academic description of the Klan and the appeal it held amongst the general population in Texas in particular can be found at the University of Texas Online Handbook. We'd encourage you to take the time to read it.

* Another charge made by anti-Masons attempting to defame Pike through ties to the (original - not current) KKK is that General Nathan Bedford Forrest was a Mason. This is yet another misleading claim. General Forrest took his FIRST of THREE degrees in Freemasonry. He did not progress further, having attended only that one, single meeting in his entire life. Under the rules of the jurisdiction in which he joined, he would not have been considered a Mason until he had taken the two additional degrees. The claim that Forrest was a Mason simply has no merit whatsoever.

While a recent book, Wyn Craig Wade's The Fiery Cross which purports to be a history of the Klan, has received generally favorable reviews, a critical examination reveals that there are several flaws in the work.

Wade was a clinical psychologist who holds no degree in history. His only prior work was a book on the Titanic which received virtually no attention whatsoever. He apparently left his psychology to teach classes in writing.

In Wade's book, there is ONE mention of Pike. It's on page 58:

"After the Klan had spread outward from Tennessee, there wasn't the slightest chance of central control over it - a problem that would characterize the Klan throughout its long career. Prominent Southern gentlemen were LATER CITED [emphasis added by Ed King] as state leaders of the Invisible Empire. Alabama claimed General John T. Morgan as Grand Dragon. Arkansas was headed by General Albert Pike, explorer and poet. North Carolina was led by former governor Zebulon Vance, and Georgia by General John B. Gordon, later a U. S. Senator."

Please note that Wade does not say WHO they were LATER CITED by....

"But the leadership of these men, originally appointed by Memphis officials, was usually IN NAME ONLY [emphasis added by EKing] and nowhere lasted longer than 1869; such experienced veterans quickly realized the impossibility of governing in secret such widespread bands of young hellions and WANTED NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR IT." [Emphasis added by EKing]

Regrettably, Wade doesn't put his footnotes for his claims in an interlinear manner. All references are simply listed in the back of the book with a page number and a list of books. It's impossible to tell what information on a page is supported by citation and what isn't. We've never seen a reference work (or any other book, actually) with references done in this manner. It certainly isn't APA, ALA, or any other accepted academic format.

Back on page 459 of this over 500 page work, the reference above is the ONLY mention of Pike! -- the references to KLAN LEADERS are cited as Stanley Horn, The Invisible Empire and Susan Davis Authentic History: Ku Klux Klan, 1865-1877. Neither of these books offers any proof of any of their claims about Pike. No citations are provided in either book.

Again, unsupportable claims furnished to defame a long-deceased individual and Freemasonry.



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 04:22 PM
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Defame freemasonry?
If it was my goal to deframe freemasonry, which it is not, as silly and childish as I think the "secret club" for grown ups is, then I would have attacked freemasonry as it is today, and not Pike.

Wether or not Pike being a satanist infuences todays freemasonry and freemasons is an entirely different discussion to begin with.
Many of the arguments that are supposed to debunk Pike being a satanist, or being connected and befriended to histories more known satanists, are not really that strong as I see it.

Of course a part of such "rumors" as the "anti-anti's" would call it, may have been started up by Pikes rather strange choice of words in his writings (such as lucifer), but who Pike really ment with those words is still not that clear to me.

If (let's take another christian look at it) Pike WAS a a satanist, and WAS under influence of demons or similar beings, then his words would probably not have been clearer than they were, maybe not even different than what he said.
You have to understand that what they MEAN and what they want YOU to think they mean, can differ.

Satanists have never been clear and open about their true motives, and have always cloaked their clearly "wrong" religion with the most wonderfull stories about light, suns and moons and symbols that mean love and happyness according to them.

So what's really going on here?
I suggest everyone, and especially the masons, who so love their "search for truth and wisdom" to begin with, start looking at Pike in a objective way.

It has to be clear that if Pike was in some way wrong, it does not mean masons today are wrong, or masonry is wrong.
Now what I would like to know, what DID Pike mean with his writings regarding spirituality?

He obviously believed in a God or Creator, but not one of out any existing religions, yet he seemed to contribute all kinds of properties, names and symbols to this "personal God" that were "borrowed" from especially the pagan religions...

[edit on 5-6-2005 by Jakko]



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by Jakko
Now what I would like to know, what DID Pike mean with his writings regarding spirituality?

He obviously believed in a God or Creator, but not one of out any existing religions, yet he seemed to contribute all kinds of properties, names and symbols to this "personal God" that were "borrowed" from especially the pagan religions...


You DO realize that Pike was writing about the study of many different systems of belief, cultures and religions, correct? You DO realize that he was not speaking of his own personal beliefs, nor the beliefs of Freemasonry as a whole, correct? In Morals and Dogma, Pike was writing about the philosophy of religious beliefs in general, for which it was necessary to study, quote and examine a wide range of cultures in the book. This is why so many people misquote Pike and mistake a religion he was talking about with being his own personal beliefs. They quote Pike out of context in a HUGE way to try to prove this, and you are making the same mistake.



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 04:42 PM
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Originally posted by Jakko
He obviously believed in a God or Creator, but not one of out any existing religions, yet he seemed to contribute all kinds of properties, names and symbols to this "personal God" that were "borrowed" from especially the pagan religions...


No. He believed in God the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. That's what Episcopalians believe and Pike was a devout Episcopalian. He STUDIED the mystery religions and other faiths and teachings. That's what people who want to LEARN about other people and other faiths and other time-periods do.

If you would actually take the time to READ his work...it's obvious from your posts that you've skimmed parts of it (likely from web-sources) and picked out parts of the book that suit your needs and haven't actually READ Pike.

(And by the way Pike wrote LOTS of books....not just Morals & Dogma.)

Anyway if you'd take the time to READ Pike you'll see that he says things like "The (insert ancient group of people here) BELIEVED...." or "The sages of the (insert ancient faith group here) TAUGHT.." etc. etc. (emphasis mine)

He didn't say "This is the way it is!" He wanted people to THINK and he did NOT want to dictate WHAT they thought or how they believed.

Freemasonry itself is about THINKING and not being led like cattle (like most fundamentalist Christians are)

Pike was a fascinating individual and highly educated (he could read and write in several languages...some say as many as 16).

There are several good books about Pike that will help you understand him as well (that is if you're genuinely interested in learning about him and not just branding him a Satanist or a Pagan as you seem wont to do)

One is called: "Albert Pike, the Man Beyond the Monument" by my friend Jim Tresner of Guthrie, OK.

www.amazon.com...

Another:

"A life of Albert Pike" by Walter Lee Brown

www.bestprices.com...

There are several others, but what I've already typed is likely a big enough waste of my time as I sincerely doubt you want to know the truth...you're satisfied with speculation based on half-baked information. That's very sad.


[edit on 5-6-2005 by senrak]



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 05:22 PM
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So he was a "regular" christian senrak?
What did he think about the bible then?



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 05:36 PM
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Originally posted by Jakko
So he was a "regular" christian senrak?
What did he think about the bible then?


I'm not sure what you mean by "regular" he certainly wasn't an "irregular" Christian.

He quoted the Bible extensively in Morals & Dogma as demonstrated in Rex Hutchens book: "The Bible in Albert Pike's Morals & Dogma"

So I'd say he was well-versed in the Bible and it's teachings, which is why I referred to him as a "devout" Episcopalian.



posted on Oct, 4 2010 @ 05:46 AM
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reply to post by eudaimonia
 


I would like to know if your source of info is reliable. I know there are certain things you are talking about that are missing key elements....



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