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Most Powerful Diesel Engine in the World!

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posted on May, 28 2005 @ 01:51 AM
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The Wartsila-Sulzer RTA96-C turbocharged two-stroke diesel engine is the most powerful and most efficient prime-mover in the world today.

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It is available in 6 through 14 cylinder versions, all are inline engines. These engines were designed primarily for very large container ships. Ship owners like a single engine/single propeller design and the new generation of larger container ships needed a bigger engine to propel them.

Wow.. big Engine would be interesting working on this but




posted on May, 28 2005 @ 02:02 AM
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that is one big mother of an engine. wonder what type of milage it gets? can i have one for a truck?



posted on May, 28 2005 @ 03:50 AM
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Doesn't this engine come standard in SUVs?


Being Canadian, I had to convert the silly imperial units into something more meaningful to me. (God bless the google unit conversion function!)

108920 hp = 81.22163 megawatts
5 608 312 lb / ft = 81 847 161 N / m
89 feet = 27.1272 meters
44 feet = 13.4112 meters
2 300 ton = 2 086 524.9 kilograms
1 660 US gallons = 6 283.78359 liters
0.278 pounds per hp per hour = 169.101114 kg per MW per hour

The engine claims over 50% efficiency. That is freaking good! Most engines are usually around 30% or so. I don't know what efficiency ship engines have already, but it should be fairly high; if I remember right, large engines are easier to make efficient than small engines, so I don't think they can shrink this design and put it in cars, for example.



posted on May, 28 2005 @ 03:55 AM
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I worked on a ship on the Great Lakes that had a Sulzer slow speed main engine. It produced 9600hp @ 120 rpm and was directly coupled to a controllable pitch propeller. It was 6 cylinder and each one weighed 1.5tons and the cylinder liner was 2 tons and 7' tall. Huge engine and burned 24 tons/day of bunker C crude. I think the fuel bill was in the $4 million range just for that ship.



posted on May, 28 2005 @ 03:59 AM
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Wonder what the cost of these engines would be & the repair bill



posted on Jun, 5 2005 @ 09:21 PM
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Why no pics of the turbo(s)???



posted on Jun, 6 2005 @ 09:39 AM
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repairing the engines is easier than you would think. One fun bit is that the pistons are so large that you can stand on them and be lowered into the cylinder to inspect the lining!!!! Gets a bit claustrophobic though.



posted on Jun, 6 2005 @ 10:03 AM
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I wrok in a diesel custom eninge shop, and all i can say is ...........WOW!

I thought the 12Vs and 16V's we were doing for boats were big.

I would love to see the price tag on that monster!

BTW, this is where I work...

Jimmy Diesel



posted on Jun, 9 2005 @ 12:27 AM
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Damn! That's a huge engine. What is confusing me is how the hell would they even be able to replace a part for something that massive if it's at sea? I'm not a boatman by any terms so the answer is most likely easier than I could imagine.

It still seems near impossible to me...



posted on Jun, 9 2005 @ 12:40 AM
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WOW ! that is HUGE - one amazing engineering feet (Excuse the pun)



posted on Jun, 9 2005 @ 01:05 AM
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Originally posted by neosnightmare
Damn! That's a huge engine. What is confusing me is how the hell would they even be able to replace a part for something that massive if it's at sea? I'm not a boatman by any terms so the answer is most likely easier than I could imagine.

It still seems near impossible to me...
i think is because they made each piston to work alone without the others.
so one can run alone and the others turn off if some of them broke
thats why is only one engine , the reason for having two is if one broke the other get you moving , but because that is so big I imagine a system like that. Independet working pistons



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