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posted on May, 25 2005 @ 02:25 PM
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I came to ATS originally searching for antigravity information. I still feel that investigation of means to defeat or nullify the gravitational field or force is one of the most pressing questions facing humanity. There are many sites dedicated to thought experiments or actual hardware experiments for antigravity devices. But none- not even the national laboratories- have any idea what the gravitational force is or how it really works. We have math and theory, but no explanations- no how. There are many theories, including:


  1. Warped space-time (Einstein).
  2. Force field.
  3. Push gravity (hypothetical massive UHF background 'rain 'of some kind).
  4. And so on...


I am more interested in its effects. By observation, we noted the apparent antigravity effects of bird's wings and campfire smoke, and so discovered aerodynamic lift and buoyancy. By observing capillary action, we have identified yet another natural phenomena that goes 'up' intead of 'down'.

Can you think of anything else that seems to exhibit a natural antigravity force? Or that explains the gravitational force itself?

Consider the following picture:



If we were to drill a tunnel tangential to the crust-mantle interface, such that it remained entirely in the solid crust, and such that it followed a geometric straight line through the curved space of the crust, what forces would we feel as we rolled through the tunnel on a wheeled vehicle?

Where would we stop?

[edit on 25-5-2005 by Chakotay]




posted on May, 25 2005 @ 03:17 PM
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If there is no friction, you'd be like on a rollercoaster -- first accelerate as you move down, then decelerate as you are coming back to the surface. By conservation of energy, you would surface with same speed with which you dove into the tunnel.



posted on May, 25 2005 @ 07:57 PM
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Excellent, Aelita! So a straight line in curved geospace is- saddle shaped.

And such a tunnel- assuming it could be built- could give us an 'almost' free ride to a distant location, like coasting a bike down one hill and up another.

Thought experiments like this can help us understand gravity, and ultimately to overcome it- or use it to overcome itself, much as a sailboat with a keel can tack against the wind.

Consider the following picture:



If a ball is released on the upper end of the ramp, rolling in the direction of the moon's rotation, what happens? Assume a diameter of 1460 kilometers, height of ramp 20km inclining to zero 2/3 of the way around the moon, gravitation equal to .02 G, rotation period of 79 days, zero aerodynamic drag, and ignore friction losses. What would be the terminal velocity of the ball?

How does this compare to the moon's escape velocity?

Question: if a gravity well is like a whirlpool, how do we get out?

A geodesic is a terrible thing to waste...

[edit on 26-5-2005 by Chakotay]



posted on May, 25 2005 @ 09:52 PM
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What would be the terminal velocity of the ball?


With a non existent to negligable atmosphere on the moon, there is no such thing as terminal velocity on the moon if I'm not mistaken



posted on May, 26 2005 @ 01:32 AM
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Originally posted by thematrix
With a non existent to negligable atmosphere on the moon, there is no such thing as terminal velocity on the moon if I'm not mistaken


Terminal velocity in the sense of end of fall; not 'the' Moon, but a moon.

Does anyone recognize which moon I might be talking about?



posted on May, 26 2005 @ 07:14 AM
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About gravity... I can't find it now, but I remember reading somewhere that gravity doesn't always point exactly to the center of the earth. Someone did a study with two very deep shafts that were separated by some many miles. They used two 'plumb bobs', one dropped in each shaft. When they measured the distance between the bottom ends, they were further apart than what people had expected. I can even remember if it was truely credible or not. If this were true, I would expect to see more information about it. Does anyone remember reading this?



posted on May, 26 2005 @ 10:17 PM
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Originally posted by Chakotay
Terminal velocity in the sense of end of fall; not 'the' Moon, but a moon.

Does anyone recognize which moon I might be talking about?


My guess goes to Iapetus.



posted on May, 27 2005 @ 02:16 PM
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'Cavorite' is a fictional term made up by HG Wells for his novel 'First Men in the Moon.'


The scientist in the story is named 'Cavor'. His plan is to create material that is naturally "transparent" to what Wells called "gravitational waves." The idea is that a ship made out of Cavorite can detach itself from a celestial body because it is immune to the pull of gravity (when the crew wants to land they just use mechanical rollers to peel back part of the Cavorite and create a surface where normal matter exists).

Though the notion of Cavorite is important because it represents the first time a fictional story ever thought about the notion of using anti-gravity for space travel (most books at the time used artillery shells), it has to be clear that it is an entirely fictional form of matter.



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