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World's First Commercial Wave Farm - Pelamis

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posted on Feb, 27 2007 @ 12:14 PM
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Originally posted by x08
how much power would it require to operate a wave-pool (one of those swimming pools that makes waves) that can create waves big enough to operate these things?

If the required power is less than the output... well... I see an opportunity for inland plants also~


That would defy the laws of thermodynamics.

You cant get more energy out of something than you put in unless it already has potential energy.




posted on Feb, 27 2007 @ 12:17 PM
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There's a lot of ocean in the world and plenty of waves. I hope this works.



posted on Feb, 27 2007 @ 01:02 PM
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Oh there's no question of wether it works or not. It does work, exceedingly well.

The only question is wether the oil companies will try to cut funding to it... and wether they will succeed at ruining a great system such as this.



posted on Feb, 27 2007 @ 08:42 PM
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I have a feeling it is only a matter of time before we see dozens of these off American shores. What can the oil industry really do to prevent it?



posted on Mar, 1 2007 @ 10:48 AM
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Originally posted by TJ11240
I have a feeling it is only a matter of time before we see dozens of these off American shores. What can the oil industry really do to prevent it?


Nothing cause its its not free energy, we are talking so the oil companies will not care.

But this technology is great, but why on the subject of waves has anyone heard any success stories with man made reefs(sand bars, surf breaks), any environmental problems and so on?

Just thought I would ask that question here to see if someone knew much about this kind of stuff.



posted on Mar, 1 2007 @ 10:51 AM
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Check out this.

www.biorock.net...



Electrically induced coral growth. Neat stuff IMO.



posted on Mar, 2 2007 @ 10:52 AM
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I wonder what will happen after first storm.

I would also like to know how "reliable" this energy source is (many alternative energy sources are backed by gas turbines that means they are not clean, nor cheap).


[edit on 2-3-2007 by longbow]



posted on Mar, 3 2007 @ 08:38 PM
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From BBC:


BBC: Wave farms show energy potential

2 March 2007



Sean O'Neill, president of a Washington DC trade association called the Ocean Renewable Energy Coalition, says: "The total potential off the coast of United States is 252 million megawatt hours a year.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



posted on Oct, 21 2007 @ 09:09 PM
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Pelamis


Ocean Power Delivery is now "Pelamis Wave Power"

Pelamis Wave Power ("Website coming soon")


Catching a wave, Euro-style

Oct 17, 2007

In keeping with their new product the manufacturer has changed its name to Pelamis Wave Power.

 


Scottish Government Approves Plan for Wave Farm

11. oktober 2007

The Scottish Government granted ScottishPower planning permission for what the company says would be the world's largest wave farm.


BBC: Orkney to get 'biggest' wave farm

20 February 2007

Scottish ministers have announced funding for what has been described as the world's biggest wave energy farm.

[---]

"This will be the world's biggest commercial wave project - significantly bigger than the major Portuguese scheme.

"Scotland has the potential to generate a quarter of Europe's marine energy and kick-starting the sector is vital if we are to create a significant industry based in Scotland and meet our long-term renewables targets."

 


Christian Science Monitor: Britain aims to rule the waves again


October 10, 2007

Britain prided itself on ruling the waves in the 19th century; they might once again in the 21st century. But not with its Navy.




posted on Nov, 28 2007 @ 09:50 PM
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3 short Pelamis videos
From 10 to 18 seconds long.


Pelamis Nosecam


Pelamis - wave energy converter


Pelamis



posted on Oct, 6 2008 @ 06:46 PM
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Pelamis Wave Power has been selected by the Dow Jones Clean Tech Summit Jury as one of Europe’s ten most innovative cleantech companies.


ReVolt Technology, Ltd Selected by Dow Jones Clean Tech Summit Jury as one Europe’s Top Ten Innovative Clean Tech Companies


October 06, 2008


The nominees for this year’s top award are: CURRENT Technologies International GmbH, Novaled AG, Pelamis Wave Power, Petrotec AG, ReVolt Technology Ltd., SiC Processing AG, Solarion AG, Solitem GmbH, Sulfurcell Solartechnik GmbH and Umicor Recycling Solutions.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.

(Bolded by me)



posted on Dec, 16 2008 @ 05:30 PM
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Hmmm. Seems like I missed the opening of the first commercial wavefarm in Portugal. Here's a video, uploaded to Youtube on November 23 2008



Portugal opens the world's first wave power farm




posted on Dec, 17 2008 @ 03:14 AM
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Originally posted by TJ11240
I have a feeling it is only a matter of time before we see dozens of these off American shores. What can the oil industry really do to prevent it?


The oil companies will be (among) the ones building them. They don't have any particular warm fuzzy spot in their hearts for crude oil; Only for your money.



posted on Nov, 10 2009 @ 03:29 PM
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Pelamis at Aguçadoura



Pelamis Wave Energy Converter generating electricity into the Portuguese grid off the coast of Aguçadoura, Portugal, October 2008

'Emptiness' sound track courtesy of Alexander Blu



posted on Feb, 4 2013 @ 10:23 AM
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Wave energy down the 124 miles (200km) length of the Western Isles has the potential to generate as much power as 120 Torness-sized nuclear power stations.


Could big waves be big news for the Western Isles? (4 February 2013)


The project uses devices called wave rider buoys, installed about five nautical miles off Bragar and Siader in Lewis, to gather data about wave height and strength.


The average wave power measured off Lewis over a one year period, October 2011 to Sept 2012, was 75.5 kilowatts per metre.


"This indicates that the wave power resource off the Outer Hebrides is even better than what was thought to be the case," said Mr Vogler.

According to his calculations the wave power potential down the 124 miles (200km) length of the Western Isles could match the output of 120 Torness-sized nuclear power stations.






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