NEWS: Young Australian Woman Faces Possible Death Sentence for Marijuana Smuggling

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posted on May, 28 2005 @ 09:01 AM
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I know it had nothing to do with the Tsunami aid. BUT the blood thirsty attitude of the prosecution is a blatant example of how SOME and I stress how SOME in countries like Indonesia greatly despise the west.

As for some Australians wanting to get their money back, heck, of cousre that’s going to happen. Something like having one of their nationals getting her neck stretched would do that. But she got 20 years .More than likely the prisoner exchange will occure between Indonesia and Australia and she’ll go home. Unfortunately Indonesian nationals being held in Australian presions won’t be too eager to set foot in Indonesian prisons.
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As for the Indonesian tourist industry being damane by this , heck I really hope so . Australians have every right to be pissed. But perhaps this incident will envoke change in the countrys court system.

[edit on C:Satocu05e5 by Opus]

[edit on C:Satocu05e5 by Opus]

[edit on C:Satocu05e5 by Opus]




posted on May, 28 2005 @ 09:11 AM
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Lady of the Lake, we are not supposed to put locks on our bags, according to the rules. I was informed of this at Check-in when travelling to the US a couple of years ago, after securing my baggage with small but sturdy padlocks through the compartment zippers.
I now use small black cable-ties (same colour as the zippers) so I know if my baggage has been tampered with when I collect it



posted on May, 28 2005 @ 06:30 PM
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News.com.au: Pardon may be Corby's best bet

CONVICTED drug smuggler Schapelle Corby's best hope of having her 20-year jail sentence reduced was an appeal for a pardon to Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono, Foreign Minister Alexander Downer said today.

Corby's family has told News Ltd newspapers that they fear the 27-year-old will take her own life if forced to serve the entire sentence.

Both the defence and the prosecution intend to appeal against her 20-year jail sentence.

"If the appeal fails, the easiest way of getting the sentence reduced is through an appeal for a pardon to the president of Indonesia."



posted on May, 28 2005 @ 08:21 PM
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Originally posted by Opus

As for the Indonesian tourist industry being damane by this , heck I really hope so . Australians have every right to be pissed. But perhaps this incident will envoke change in the countrys court system.


Futile however because it will do nothing to change Indonesia's court system. In fact it ciould make it a lot worse for foreigners and as stated previously innocent people pay the price yet again.



posted on May, 29 2005 @ 07:49 AM
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we shell see , hopefuley people power will prevail .



posted on May, 29 2005 @ 08:42 AM
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Originally posted by goose
Well I completely agree with jonSUN except for killing anyone, that I would not want to be a part of but I definitely would do everything to get her home safely, it sounds as though the judge sentenced her to 20 years even though evidence was presented proving she had nothing to do with it, it sounds as though this case got a lot of publicity and to declare her totally innocent would have made their country look foolish so instead he chose to punish an innocent person to save face. But what this case has done is make sure that no one will travel there unless it is for business and a have to case. Perhaps the only way to help her right now is for anyone and everyone to write a letter letting them know that they will not travel there until she is free, for other country leaders to step forward and issue a statement in protest and to declare that country off limit to its tourists until the laws are changed and she is free, hit them in the wallet and changes will be made.


I agree with you......It could be an 'option'

Except most people probably wouldn't be bothered to go out of their way, to try and help......Unfortunately.

There was this Email, that I signed and petitioned, but it didn't appear to work did it


I still can't believe that this is the 'end' of this case, I just keep thinking that something is going to happen to change it all


Who knows......



posted on May, 29 2005 @ 11:49 PM
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It's funny. I heard from somewhere that for alot of Indonesians, they are giving so much attention to this case not because they supporting Shapelle, but because they are hoping for a prisoner exchange program to get back some of their relatives held in Australia..

Aussies are a HUGE source of income to Indonesia, for some reason australian/indonesian relations didn't seem to get taken into consideration, it was more the judge saying "well, I've handled 500 drug cases and I've never let someone off yet, so I'm not about to start now".

I believe this is going to hurt their tourist industry hard. I know I'm not planning on going to Bali anytime soon, and literally every other aussie I've spoken to has said the same thing.

I suppose we can at least be thankfull to the judge(s) that they were a bit softer on Shapelle & only have her 20years instead of the death penalty or life. At least she has a (slim) chance of being released early.



posted on May, 31 2005 @ 12:36 PM
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posted on May, 31 2005 @ 01:48 PM
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Originally posted by LordGoofus
It's funny. I heard from somewhere that for alot of Indonesians, they are giving so much attention to this case not because they supporting Shapelle, but because they are hoping for a prisoner exchange program to get back some of their relatives held in Australia..


Lord G', that campaigning by Indonesians for a 'two way' prisoner transfer could have something to do with illegal fishing in Australian waters.

ELEANOR HALL: Customs and naval authorities off Australia's north coast have been kept busy this week, dealing with a big surge in the number of Indonesian fishing boats poaching in Australian waters.

The presence of illegal boats in Australia is nothing new, nor is their target – shark-fin. But there are signs the poaching is having a serious impact on Australia's shark stocks.

Now, as Anne Barker reports from Darwin, marine researchers are preparing to undertake an unusual underwater study to examine just how many sharks remain in Australian waters.

ANNE BARKER: Indonesian fishermen have been plying Australian waters for centuries. Originally they came in search of trepang or sea cucumber. Some still come for the shiny trochus shells found off the West Australian coast. But these days it's shark that lures them in ever increasing numbers, for the prized shark-fin – a delicacy in Chinese cuisine.

Fisheries Officer Roy McKay says calm conditions have brought a surge in the number of boats in recent weeks

ROY MCKAY: We've had 36 vessels brought into Darwin since January 1, and that would be maybe, you know, a 20 to 30 per cent increase, I think, at this time of year. These people are opportunistic. If there's calm weather, they'll go fishing.

ANNE BARKER: In the past week and a half 24 boats and their crews have been apprehended and brought into Darwin, after being caught poaching in Australia's northern waters. Most boats are eventually burnt and the crews either charged or flown home.

Since the 1970's Australia has allowed traditional Indonesian fishermen, in un-motorised boats, to fish in a small boxed area which includes the Ashmore and Cartier reefs.

But as the demand for shark-fin soars in Asian markets, to above $100 a kilo, these shark stocks have been increasingly under threat, forcing many boats to poach in Australian waters.

Mark Meekan from the Australian Institute of Marine Science has seen a noticeable drop in shark numbers.

Source

Darwin detention centre 'online by year's end'.

The Indonesian ambassador, Imron Cotan, says he would like to see Indonesian fishermen detained on land rather than on their boats.

His call follows the death of a fisherman on a vessel in Darwin Harbour last month.

While the man died of natural causes, the ambassador has said he is seeking reassurance the Government will move quickly on its policy to detain people on land.

But federal Fisheries Minister Senator Ian Macdonald says it is still not likely Darwin's Berrimah detention centre will be used before the end of the year.

"That has required a certain amount of upgrading of that centre to bring it up to Immigration Department standards," he said.

"That work is being progressed and I'm hopeful that the new land based arrangements will be in place by the end of this year."

Source



posted on Jun, 1 2005 @ 04:19 AM
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As an Australian I think its stupid that other australians want to take money back from the indonesian aid relief.

3 men gave her the sentence, not every indonesian
the tsunami didn't even affect bali directly (from memory)

And those morons that decided to send biological white powder to the indonesian embassy in Australia. That will make things worse if anything



posted on Jul, 20 2005 @ 05:49 PM
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The trial has been reopened. However, key witnesses expected to testify in Schapelle Corby´s favour have failed to appear.


Channelnewsasia: Indonesia reopens drugs trial of Aussie woman, key witnesses absent

The trial of an Australian woman convicted of drug smuggling has been reopened in Indonesia's Bali island but key witnesses expected to testify in her favour have failed to appear.

A district court in Bali sentenced Schapelle Corby to 20 years in prison in March for smuggling 4.1 kilogrammes (nine pounds) of marijuana into the resort island.

The Bali High Court later granted a request by Corby's lawyers for the reopening of the trial to hear new witnesses who could support her claim that the drugs found in her possession were placed there by someone else.

"We will request an extension on the trial at today's hearing to allow witnesses to testify later," defence lawyer Erwin Siregar told AFP before the start of the hearing.



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



posted on Jul, 20 2005 @ 07:19 PM
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The altruistic act of coming forward to say "those drugs were mine" would be unlikely to fit the character of a smuggler of drugs of this quantity. There is no immunity from the Australian government and certainly none from the Indonesian government. A strategy calling on a person directly involved in the smuggling is doomed.



posted on Jul, 20 2005 @ 08:34 PM
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THIS IS JUST EFFING RIDICULOUS!!!!!!!!!!!!! WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH HUMANITY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!IT'S WEED, CHILL OUT PEOPLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



posted on Oct, 12 2005 @ 03:56 AM
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shes only doing 15years now even though shes guilty



posted on Oct, 12 2005 @ 04:06 AM
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Originally posted by Kitsunegari
THIS IS JUST EFFING RIDICULOUS!!!!!!!!!!!!! WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH HUMANITY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!IT'S WEED, CHILL OUT PEOPLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!



dude, its 4 KILOS of weed, not like she had a few spliffs with her for her own consumption.

easy money huh



posted on Oct, 13 2005 @ 12:53 PM
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This already went into BTS.
I agree with the guy saying it is only weed.
And for the money, how much 4 kilos would cost, I think marijuana is cheap especially when you sell that quantity per kilo.
It maybe is easy money but not so big money to go 15 years for this.





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