It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Collapse of the universe

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 18 2005 @ 09:51 AM
link   
A pardigm of mine: If the universe is shrinking and the galaxies are distancing themselves from one another, what will happen when the outer most galaxies from the center collide or meet with the edge of the universe? Will this puncture the universe like a knife would a balloon and destroy the universe or send the galazies flying about into other dimensions, other universes. Or would this galaxy, say reappear on the other side of the universe?


Enjoi




posted on May, 18 2005 @ 09:56 AM
link   

Originally posted by Frosty
If the universe is shrinking

But it's not. It's in a constant state of expansion.


Originally posted by Frosty
and the galaxies are distancing themselves from one another,

Only because the universe is expanding, therefore it's only natural that galaxies seperate from each other also.


Originally posted by Frosty
what will happen when the outer most galaxies from the center collide or meet with the edge of the universe?

Galaxies only seperate from each other because of the constant expansion of the universe. If the universe stop expanding, then the galaxies would stop their movement frmo each other. It would be impossible for a galaxy to independently move without the movement of the universe. So it would be impossible for it to 'collide' with the edge of the universe.



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 10:03 AM
link   
As i understand it the exspansion is due to the fact that the 'empty space' inbetween the galaxies is growing. So wouldn't the 'edge' be growing at the same rate? In other words no galaxy can 'over'take' the exspansion because the same force is driving both....correct? Something to do with the cosmological constant i believe.



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 10:05 AM
link   
What you mean Dark Energy? Phaw, it was just invented by theorists to make thier antiquated equasions make sense. We need new theories and new maths to describe the ever increasing speed of the expansion of the universe.

[edit on 18-5-2005 by sardion2000]

[edit on 18-5-2005 by sardion2000]



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 11:23 AM
link   

Originally posted by sardion2000
What you mean Dark Energy? Phaw, it was just invented by theorists to make thier antiquated equasions make sense. We need new theories and new maths to describe the ever increasing speed of the expansion of the universe.

[edit on 18-5-2005 by sardion2000]

[edit on 18-5-2005 by sardion2000]


Here is a better explanation about the cosmological constant, 'dark energy', the vacuum energy, universal negative pressure, or energy of empty space.

How does dark matter determine the fate of the Universe?
The expansion of the Universe is not an explosion in space, but of space. Galaxies are at rest with respect to local space; it's space itself that is expanding. We are not at the center, nor is anyone else. from: exobio.ucsd.edu...


I thought this theory(more or less) was now the accepted one to explain what's countering gravity(if its not there then gravity should be slowing down the exspansion by now, but instead its speeding up)



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 11:26 AM
link   
dark energy has an opposite gravitational effect, the excact nature is unbeknowenst. after watching a compeling documentary about the nature of black holes and singularities core effect on the surrounding galaxy it would seem as the gravitational influx of energy is what spews life and all surrounding light matter. so imo the more a galaxy grows as a result of light energy the more it will harbor matter and its necesary means for creation of a more vast region of light matter and the makes of what we know as a paramount set of universal components.



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 11:31 AM
link   

Originally posted by sardion2000
What you mean Dark Energy? Phaw, it was just invented by theorists to make thier antiquated equasions make sense. We need new theories and new maths to describe the ever increasing speed of the expansion of the universe.


Dear Sir, what are your qualifications in the field of Physics? They must be quite high as you so jubilantly exude disdain for the theorists.
I'm also very sure that you were able to penetrate the hard parts of the Theory of General Relativity and clearly and objectively expose its falsehood.

My own theory of sorts is that you don't know jack about physics.



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 11:32 AM
link   
Rren, that would be all well and good if Observations corresponded to Theory. But this article say there is still some dispute.

Link
EDIT Dam my link isn't working, just google up "Dark Energy" and click on the wikipedia entry at the top of the search results page.

[edit on 18-5-2005 by sardion2000]



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 11:46 AM
link   

en.wikipedia.org...< br /> Other ideas
Some theorists think that dark energy and cosmic acceleration are a failure of general relativity on very large scales, larger than superclusters. It is a tremendous extrapolation to think that our theory of gravity, which works so well in the solar system, should work without correction on the scale of the universe. However, most attempts at modifying general relativity have turned out either to be equivalent to theories of quintessence, or are inconsistent with observations.

Other ideas for dark energy have come from string theory, brane cosmology and the holographic principle, but have not yet proved as compelling as quintessence and the cosmological constant.


Im not sure what you saying sardion2000. You prefer another theory(other than some kind of dark energy)? Or are you saying that the Universe is not expanding? Nobody claims to know what 'dark energy'(IMO) is exactly but there is something there and we cant detect it correct?



posted on May, 18 2005 @ 05:30 PM
link   
So the galaxies expand as the universe expands, or at least the space between them, and many of you seem to say that this should naturally occur? So shouldn't the mass of these galaxies expand as well? I always thought that it would be possible for the universe to be constantly be expanding and contracting like a heart though within this heart(universe) a constant relation of all objects to each other and to the space between is maintained.
Essentially the universe may increase a thousand fold what it was 2 seconds ago but everything, space, time, and matter would expand at the same rate, and then contract 3 seconds late 4 fold what it was prior. So, if this were happening, how could I prove this? So I thought: what if the the space within the universe began to contract at a slower rate than what the universe was contracting at. And say it reached a point to where a galaxy will pierce or come in contact with the edge. Could a galaxy piercing the outer rim of this universe prove the theory? OR is there some other means?



posted on May, 19 2005 @ 09:09 AM
link   

Originally posted by Frosty
So the galaxies expand as the universe expands, or at least the space between them, and many of you seem to say that this should naturally occur? So shouldn't the mass of these galaxies expand as well? I always thought that it would be possible for the universe to be constantly be expanding and contracting like a heart though within this heart(universe) a constant relation of all objects to each other and to the space between is maintained.
Essentially the universe may increase a thousand fold what it was 2 seconds ago but everything, space, time, and matter would expand at the same rate, and then contract 3 seconds late 4 fold what it was prior. So, if this were happening, how could I prove this? So I thought: what if the the space within the universe began to contract at a slower rate than what the universe was contracting at. And say it reached a point to where a galaxy will pierce or come in contact with the edge. Could a galaxy piercing the outer rim of this universe prove the theory? OR is there some other means?



I'm only a layman, a physicist would have to explain it for you. But as I understand it the expansion(creation of new empty space) only occurs in deep interstellar space(where gravity has little or no effect). So in other words the stars in a galaxy move according to their center due to gravity(they are not moving away from one another), the galaxy itself is moving away from all other galaxies, riding or being pushed by the dark energy or whatever you want to call it.

As to the exspansion and contraction, would we not see enormous 'red shifts' in the light of stars?

(edit)also in the currently accepted model of the Universe, there is no center and i think no edge(again only as i understand it)

[edit on 19-5-2005 by Rren]



posted on May, 20 2005 @ 02:42 PM
link   
I will say this much:

The Universe is expanding at an accelerating rate, and yes, that means the space between them. Think of it as blowing up a balloon.

If you want more, some of you need to enroll in college level courses. I would say unless you're a very clever individual, you most likely will not grasp most concepts without proper mathematical training.




top topics



 
0

log in

join