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Lost city of the Grand Canyon

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posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 03:19 AM
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Originally posted by pwrthtbe
I found a very interesting picture on the Glen Canyon Institute's web site. The pictures are from an album that was created before the canyon was flooded. I found a picture that MAY validate the Egyptian theme. I'm no glyph expert but might not this be Egyptian?


Nope. And speaking as someone who does both Egyptian hieroglyphs AND Native American Rock art, that's very typical of the Southwest style of Rock Art. One of the prominent symbols there is the Bighorn sheep (doesn't exist in Egypt) and was the shaman's helper (specifically for rain making) for that area. One of the figures holds a bow, indicating that those pictographs were done some time after 1400 AD. They don't appear to be modern fakes, but they're fairly recent and the pictographs are nice and bright.

edit on 11-3-2012 by Byrd because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 11 2012 @ 04:20 AM
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Originally posted by Byrd

Originally posted by pwrthtbe
I found a very interesting picture on the Glen Canyon Institute's web site. The pictures are from an album that was created before the canyon was flooded. I found a picture that MAY validate the Egyptian theme. I'm no glyph expert but might not this be Egyptian?


Nope. And speaking as someone who does both Egyptian hieroglyphs AND Native American Rock art, that's very typical of the Southwest style of Rock Art. One of the prominent symbols there is the Bighorn sheep (doesn't exist in Egypt) and was the shaman's helper (specifically for rain making) for that area. One of the figures holds a bow, indicating that those pictographs were done some time after 1400 AD. They don't appear to be modern fakes, but they're fairly recent and the pictographs are nice and bright.

edit on 11-3-2012 by Byrd because: (no reason given)

Hello bryd
Are you familiar with the petroglyphs along the san joaquin river on central cal They are carved into the exposed hardpan of the river cut. I stumbled across them as a youth while hunting,but can find no current reference to them. And as far as I know the central cal tribes really didn't do much rock carving.


(post by JosephLakeResearch removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

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