It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

NEWS: Whale Beaching Newly Linked to Solar Surges

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 14 2005 @ 01:23 AM
link   
University of Kiel researchers Klaus Vaneslow and Claus Ricklefs, who looked at sightings of beached sperm whales in the North Sea between 1712 and 2003 have reported that the beachings may be due to surges of solar activity. The study found that the solar surges possibly disrupt the whales internal compasses and speculates that the whales may have a magnetic orientation similiar to pigeons, who navigate by small magnetic crystals on their beaks.
 



www.abc.net.au
The sun experiences cycles of activity which range from eight to 17 years, with 11 years being the average.

Short cycles are linked with periods of high energy output, while long cycles are believed to be low energy.

Changes in levels of solar radiation have a big effect on earth's magnetic field.

The most notable events are solar flares that cause shimmering lights, called aurorae, in the magnetic fields in polar regions.

Big solar flares can also disrupt telecommunications and power lines and knock out delicate electronic circuitry on satellites.

The researchers found that of the 97 stranding events reported around the coastal countries of the North Sea over the 291 years, 90 per cent occurred when the sun cycles were below average in duration.



Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Whale beaching records were compared to historical data on sunspot activity and it was found that the whale beachings occur when the sunspot activity is high. It is suggested that the migratory path of the whales could be disrupted by minor changes in the geomagnetic fields entering the North Sea from the Norwegian Sea.

In the past powerful marine sonar has been blamed for interfering with the whales sense of direction causing them to strand themselves.

[edit on 14-5-2005 by Mayet]




posted on May, 14 2005 @ 01:34 AM
link   

The researchers found that of the 97 stranding events reported around the coastal countries of the North Sea over the 291 years, 90 per cent occurred when the sun cycles were below average in duration.


how would you explain the other 10% then?

still, pretty interesting theory.



posted on May, 14 2005 @ 01:46 AM
link   
Well as the article states, i would say the other ten percent could be caused by earth based interference like the marine sonar or other signals disturbing the force



posted on May, 14 2005 @ 09:53 AM
link   

University of Kiel researchers Klaus Vaneslow and Claus Ricklefs, who looked at sightings of beached sperm whales in the North Sea between 1712 and 2003


Man those are some real old researchers. Like the story but would suggest you change from news to Sci/Tech since it is research related.

Still voting yes though.



posted on May, 14 2005 @ 10:51 AM
link   
How inspiring these news releases are. I mean it has nothing to do with Navy Sonar blasting the ocean at 150 decibels. Oh it is all just swamp gas, all those witnesses to UFOs were victims of the will 'o the wisp. By the same token calling it solar cycles is in the same deflection category. Will people wake up to these newsfeeds, that they are highly likely to be marginal at best or outright disinformation to muddy the waters. Well is anyone else stepping to the plate to deny ignorance?



posted on May, 14 2005 @ 02:54 PM
link   
When I read the story I found it to be interesting. Whale beachings have long since fascinated me and if answers can be found then great. i don't think this ones about denying ignorance. I think it may possibly be a plausible reason for mysterious beachings.

I could always say a UFO comes along and sends a signal to the whales which causes them to do a lemming act and beach themself, therefore dying.

Or , now deeper in thought.... we could blame HAARP.....





top topics
 
0

log in

join