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North Korea calls Bush "Hitler Junior"

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posted on May, 10 2005 @ 10:31 AM
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The state run newspaper, Rodong Sinmun, labled Bush "Hitler Junior" in reaction to Washington's attempts to bring North Korea back to the negotiation table to discuss their nucluear programs.



North Korea's harsh language was in a commentary in the main state-run newspaper, Rodong Sinmun, one day after Washington tried to coax the country back to the negotiating table by reconfirming that it considered the country "sovereign" and would hold direct talks as part of six-party nuclear negotiations.


"It is a wise decision for our republic not to expect any settlement of the nuclear issue or any improvement in its relations with the United States during Bush's term of office," said the commentary in Rodong Sinmun. "Bush is the world's worst fascist dictator, a first-class warmaniac and Hitler, Junior, who is jerking his hands stained with blood of innocent people."


The newspaper said Washington's threat of persuading the UN Security Council to impose sanctions against the impoverished country would not affect its determination to "stick fast to the path we have chosen."


"The dog barks, but the caravan continues," it said. The commentary did not elaborate; anti-American diatribes are common in North Korea's media.

There are increasing fears that North Korea may unload spent fuel rods from its nuclear reactor and reprocess them to glean bomb materials and may even conduct an underground nuclear test.


In a meeting with Secretary General Kofi Annan of the United Nations in Moscow, President Roh Moo Hyun of South Korea said he hoped "North Korea would not take extreme measures" and would return to the stalled six-nation talks, his aides said.


U.S. officials said last week that spy satellites showed possible preparations for North Korea's first nuclear test, including the digging and refilling of a large hole at a suspected test site, along with the apparent construction of a reviewing stand. But experts said that North Korea might be putting on a show for spy satellites.


"We should not jump to a conclusion," Chun said of the images. North Korea, he said, "would do anything to make other countries believe that it is a nuclear power." But he added that "if North Korea decides to test a nuclear weapon, it means it will gamble with its own fate, and it won't be an easy decision."


Chun downplayed a domestic news report that quoted him as saying that the United States could not attack North Korea's nuclear facilities without South Korea's consent. He said he was speaking "in principle."

In Washington, a U.S. State Department spokesman, Tom Casey, noted that U.S. and North Korean officials had met separately during three rounds of six-party talks with China as host in 2003 and 2004. "If the North Koreans were to return to the talks, we'd certainly continue that practice."


On Sunday, a North Korean spokesman said his government wanted to meet U.S. officials.

SEOUL North Korea intensified its nuclear confrontation with the United States on Tuesday, calling President George W. Bush "Hitler, Junior," while South Korea warned the Communist state against taking "extreme measures," in an apparent reference to a nuclear test.

Chun Yung Woo, South Korea's deputy foreign minister for policy planning, stressed the alliance between his country and the United States and said the countries would work together on the North Korea issue.

"The militaries might be preparing for all contingencies, but it's the presidents who make the decision" on a possible military attack, Chun said. "Given the alliance between the United States and South Korea, such a thing is impossible without prior consultations between the allies."

Chun said he was speaking only in principle and stressed he was not aware of any U.S. plan to attack North Korea.

North Korea's harsh language was in a commentary in the main state-run newspaper, Rodong Sinmun, one day after Washington tried to coax the country back to the negotiating table by reconfirming that it considered the country "sovereign" and would hold direct talks as part of six-party nuclear negotiations.


"It is a wise decision for our republic not to expect any settlement of the nuclear issue or any improvement in its relations with the United States during Bush's term of office," said the commentary in Rodong Sinmun. "Bush is the world's worst fascist dictator, a first-class warmaniac and Hitler, Junior, who is jerking his hands stained with blood of innocent people."


The newspaper said Washington's threat of persuading the UN Security Council to impose sanctions against the impoverished country would not affect its determination to "stick fast to the path we have chosen."


"The dog barks, but the caravan continues," it said. The commentary did not elaborate; anti-American diatribes are common in North Korea's media.

There are increasing fears that North Korea may unload spent fuel rods from its nuclear reactor and reprocess them to glean bomb materials and may even conduct an underground nuclear test.


In a meeting with Secretary General Kofi Annan of the United Nations in Moscow, President Roh Moo Hyun of South Korea said he hoped "North Korea would not take extreme measures" and would return to the stalled six-nation talks, his aides said.


U.S. officials said last week that spy satellites showed possible preparations for North Korea's first nuclear test, including the digging and refilling of a large hole at a suspected test site, along with the apparent construction of a reviewing stand. But experts said that North Korea might be putting on a show for spy satellites.


"We should not jump to a conclusion," Chun said of the images. North Korea, he said, "would do anything to make other countries believe that it is a nuclear power." But he added that "if North Korea decides to test a nuclear weapon, it means it will gamble with its own fate, and it won't be an easy decision."


Chun downplayed a domestic news report that quoted him as saying that the United States could not attack North Korea's nuclear facilities without South Korea's consent. He said he was speaking "in principle."

In Washington, a U.S. State Department spokesman, Tom Casey, noted that U.S. and North Korean officials had met separately during three rounds of six-party talks with China as host in 2003 and 2004. "If the North Koreans were to return to the talks, we'd certainly continue that practice."


On Sunday, a North Korean spokesman said his government wanted to meet U.S. officials.

www.iht.com...


It should be interesting to see just how far N. Korea is going to push this. According to satellite imaging, they are practicly set up to test thier nuke. The question is, when they test it, what will be Bush's response?

[edit on 10-5-2005 by mpeake]




posted on May, 10 2005 @ 10:32 AM
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yeah, well kim jong il has funny hair !


take that !



posted on May, 10 2005 @ 11:07 AM
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Quick scan all ips registered on this site for one located in nk, i think the nk's have been reading ATS..

[edit on 10-5-2005 by C0le]



posted on May, 22 2005 @ 05:20 PM
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Ok, so North Korea now joins Democrats in comparing Bush to Hitler. Anyone surprised?



posted on May, 22 2005 @ 07:15 PM
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Pot calling the kettle black...

I don't understand the reasoning here. Bush wants to discuss North Korea's Nukes, therefore he is like Hitler?

Jong Il could use a history lesson.



posted on May, 22 2005 @ 09:47 PM
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Well...

Maybe there are just two steps removed.

In my opinion it is unlikely that George HW Bush was Adolf Hitler.

BUT Prescott Bush was certainly Hitler friendly just one generation before... and if there was a swinging scene going on, then it only remains to prove George HW Bush's paternity and to make sure Hitler was not in on that.

I "hear" that Westerners all look alike to North Koreans, so pending resolution of the paternity suit, perhaps the editors at the state newspaper might be temporarily forgiven.



[edit on 22-5-2005 by MaskedAvatar]




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