Masonic relief phrases?

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posted on May, 8 2005 @ 10:45 PM
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I heard/read somewhere that masons have phrases that they can say in times of dire necessity/need, that when spoken, a mason cannot ignore the plea, and must do everything in his power to releive the mason of his troubles.

The phrase:

"Is there no relief for the son of a widow?"

Fact or fiction: you tell me.

[edit on 8-5-2005 by Eyeofhorus]




posted on May, 8 2005 @ 10:49 PM
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Originally posted by Eyeofhorus
I heard/read somewhere that masons have phrases that they can say in times of dire necessity/need, that when spoken, a mason cannot ignore the plea, and must do everything in his power to releive the mason of his troubles.

The phrase:

"Is there no releif for the son of a widow?"

Fact or fiction: you tell me.


There are several words, phrases, etc. that we are taught to use to recognize each other "in the darkness as well as in the light"

The phrase "widow's son" is a reference to Hiram the builder, the Widow's son of Haphtali who figures in to the "legend of the Temple" an important allegory of the Master Mason degree.

A really GOOD explanation of this is found in Brother Allen E. Roberts book "The Craft and It's Symbols" which is available from Macoy Publishing & Supply

www.macoy.com



posted on May, 8 2005 @ 10:53 PM
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What is the significance of the widow? Is it symbolic of Columbia, who is portrayed in our statue of liberty, cluthing "the light?" Or something else.

Also was statue of liberty a gift from French freemasons?

[edit on 8-5-2005 by Eyeofhorus]



posted on May, 8 2005 @ 10:55 PM
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Originally posted by Eyeofhorus
What is the significance of the widow? Is it symbolic of Columbia, who is portrayed in our statue of liberty, cluthing "the light?" Or something else.

Also was statue of liberty a gift from Frencg freemasons?


There is NO masonic symbolism in the statue of liberty, although the creator was a mason.


[edit on 8-5-2005 by sebatwerk]



posted on May, 8 2005 @ 11:10 PM
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Originally posted by Eyeofhorus
What is the significance of the widow?


No, it's the SON of the widow (Hiram) who's important. From the old testament story of the Widow's son of the tribe of Naphtali. (Can't quote chap & verse right now...it's getting late)




Also was statue of liberty a gift from French freemasons?


It was a gift from the French and it's designer was a Mason, no significance beyond that, though.



posted on May, 9 2005 @ 12:43 AM
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If I memory serves, there is a cornerstone and a Masonic dedication on the Statue of Liberty...

www.libertystatepark.org...

4th paragraph.

I couldn't find anything on the plate, but I'm thinking I've seen pictures of it; I believe it's on the Northeast corner of the pedestal, and it has the square and compass emblem, along with the names of the officers (at the time) of the Grand Lodge of the state of New York. Can anyone verify this?

P.S. I think I know the phrase you are speaking of, but I'm not going to post it... I will tell you that you've got the wording somewhat wrong, if it is indeed what I'm thinking. You're close though...


[edit on 5/9/05 by The Axeman]



posted on May, 9 2005 @ 12:47 AM
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My favorite Masonic relief phrase after toiling through a hot summer's day on an octogenarian member's garden or in some community project is "Who's ready for a beer?"



posted on May, 9 2005 @ 01:09 AM
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Originally posted by MaskedAvatar
My favorite Masonic relief phrase after toiling through a hot summer's day on an octogenarian member's garden or in some community project is "Who's ready for a beer?"


I would have to agree with that, Masonic relief phrase or not...



posted on May, 9 2005 @ 01:36 AM
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Originally posted by Eyeofhorus
I heard/read somewhere that masons have phrases that they can say in times of dire necessity/need, that when spoken, a mason cannot ignore the plea, and must do everything in his power to releive the mason of his troubles.


Well, you're half right. A freemason is under no obligation to relieve a fellow brother in distress, but I can't imagine many situations where he wouldn't step in to help if he could.



posted on May, 9 2005 @ 02:28 AM
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Originally posted by MaskedAvatar
My favorite Masonic relief phrase after toiling through a hot summer's day on an octogenarian member's garden or in some community project is "Who's ready for a beer?"


My pleas for help usually sound something like "... I promise I'll wash my hands after I'm done!"


[edit on 9-5-2005 by sebatwerk]






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