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Howard will stand down as leader

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posted on May, 6 2005 @ 07:42 AM
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Michael Howard announced his surprise decision in Putney
Tory leader Michael Howard will stand down "sooner rather than later" to allow a younger leader to take over.
Mr Howard said he would stay as leader until the party had the opportunity to consider whether it wanted to change the rules for electing a successor.

With few seats undeclared, Labour are on 353, down 47, the Tories on 197, up 31, and the Lib Dems on 62, up 10.

Mr Howard said the party's results and campaign meant that it could now "hold its head up high".


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


Howard will stand down as leader

It seems we were right and so was the panel about the general election. I feel its right for Howard to stand down now and allow a young leader to take charge so that this party can stand a chance to win the next election.




posted on May, 6 2005 @ 10:12 AM
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I think it best he stands down, I'm hearing that David Davis looks promising to take over, thoughts?



posted on May, 7 2005 @ 11:39 AM
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Link: BBC

Potential Tory Leaders:

David Davis


The right-wing former Europe minister ran as the "dark horse" candidate in the 2001 leadership contest.


Malcolm Rifkind


One of the remaining Tory "big beasts", his oratorical skills were quickly recognised by Margaret Thatcher soon after he entered the House of Commons in 1974.


Liam Fox

First elected to Parliament in 1992, Liam Fox soon became a government whip and later a Foreign Office minister when the Conservatives were in power.


David Cameron


The head of policy co-ordination, who worked on the Prime Minister's Questions briefing team for both Margaret Thatcher and John Major, has seen a rapid rise through the Tory ranks.


George Osborne


Rising star George Osborne entered Parliament in 2001 with Mr Cameron they have been portrayed by some as the "Tony Blair and Gordon Brown" of the party.



[edit on 7-5-2005 by UK Wizard]



posted on May, 7 2005 @ 11:39 AM
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Originally posted by UK Wizard
I think it best he stands down, I'm hearing that David Davis looks promising to take over, thoughts?


David Davis is odds on to take over,
the BBC has a special on its Election 2005 on who will take over

[edit]

You just posted it lol

My money is on David Davis, he would make an excellent prime minister if he got voted in

[edit on 7-5-2005 by infinite]



posted on Jun, 10 2005 @ 07:46 AM
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Originally posted by infinite
My money is on David Davis, he would make an excellent prime minister if he got voted in


I have my doubts over Mr Davis, he knows his stuff but I feel that making him leader will damage the Conservative Party further, he's good dealing with the traditional right wing grounds of immigration and crime but making him leader would show that the Conservatives are happy sitting on the right wing of politics.
I think they need a moderniser, I would say Kenneth Clarke but his stance on Europe would be bad for the party, lets be honest the Conservative Party don't like the EU and having your leader as someone who does like it isn't a representation of the party.
I think the Conservative party should go with 'Sir Malcolm Rifkind' he has a past with failed past Conservative Governments but I believe he could be a reformer:


BBC Link



Sir Malcolm said: "The reality is that winning back the centre ground is not an option, but a necessity for the Conservative Party."


Which is exactly what the Tories need to do if they ever want to get back in power.



posted on Jun, 10 2005 @ 08:20 AM
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I think the tory party have an opportunity to completely break with the past, if they fail to take it (and that means both personalities and policy) they simply stand no hope but collapse.

Continually selecting from such a narrow and utterly unrepresentitive base as they invariably do is just not what is required IMO.
They really ought to think about barring privately educated city people!


Of the people mentioned here Cameron is the only one with any real appeal IMO (even if questions arise from background; he is yet another Eton tory from the city and his work as a researcher for John Major and advisor for Michael Howard).
www.conservatives.com...

Osbourne is yet another odd immigrant's son intent on lecturing everyone about 'traditional British values' etc etc (so he could well be up for it!
).
Also he is Oxbridge fodder although this time a journo in a previous life. Hague's political secretary isn't the best reference either, I'd suggest.
www.conservatives.com...

Rifkind, Fox and Davis all have waaaaaaaaay too much history and association with the old tory gov's and old tory policy/attitudes.

Rifkind will be 63 or 64 at the next general election.
www.conservatives.com...

Fox also has a total 'appeal' by-pass and has been waaaay too close to Howard in the past IMO.
www.conservatives.com...

(Davis in particular has plenty of baggage - especially regarding his refusal to condem outright racism from certain ex-tories.
He might have superficial appeal but I can't see him bringing anything but trouble of a kind they don't need.
He'll also be 61 or 62 by the next election.)
www.conservatives.com...



posted on Jun, 12 2005 @ 11:57 AM
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Originally posted by sminkeypinkey
Rifkind, Fox and Davis all have waaaaaaaaay too much history and association with the old tory gov's and old tory policy/attitudes.


I see what you mean, even though Rifkind is giving off the glow of reform and a centralist stance he still has a big stamp on his forehead saying ''Old Style Conservative''


Originally posted by sminkeypinkey
Of the people mentioned here Cameron is the only one with any real appeal IMO (even if questions arise from background; he is yet another Eton tory from the city and his work as a researcher for John Major and advisor for Michael Howard).
www.conservatives.com...


I think you right, in todays Mail on Sunday (your favourite paper
) theres a article about him and his leadership battle, he's also wrote a article himself about saving special schools.
From both articles I can say he seems like a good moderate/centralist leader who presuming backing from the party could make a good leader and possibly a good PM.




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