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SCI/TECH: NASA Experimenting With Artificial Gravity

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posted on May, 4 2005 @ 09:04 PM
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NASA is hoping to find new ways for humans to overcome the detrimental effects of weightlessness. The University of Texas Medical Branch, or UTMB is working with NASA to overcome a serious problem of extended time spent weightless. This research will play an important part in designing space ships for travelling beyond the moon.
 



www.sciencedaily.com...

"The studies may help us to develop appropriate prescriptions for using a centrifuge to protect crews and to understand the side effects of artificial gravity on people," said Dr. Bill Paloski, NASA principal scientist in JSC's Human Adaptation and Countermeasures Office and principal investigator for the project. "In the past, we have only been able to examine bits and pieces. We've looked at how artificial gravity might be used as a countermeasure for, say, cardiovascular changes or balance disorders. This will allow us to look at the effect of artificial gravity as a countermeasure for the entire body," he added.

The research will take place in UTMB's NIH-sponsored General Clinical Research Center. The study supports NASA's Artificial Gravity Biomedical Research Project.

"Physicians and scientists from all over the world will travel to UTMB to study the stresses that spaceflight imposes on cardiovascular function, bone density, neurological activity and other physiological systems," said Dr. Adrian Perachio, executive director of strategic research collaborations at UTMB. "This is an excellent example of collaboration among the academic, federal and private sectors in research that will benefit the health of both astronauts and those of us on Earth," he added.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


It's good to hear that NASA is doing research towards space exploration. The data collected from this study could help us reach mars quicker, and more comfortably.

It makes me wonder if these studies are leading up to a new constant boost style ship. If we had a drive capable of 1 g constant boost we could make it to mars in 4.59 days instead of the three year trip now on the table. Even a constant boost ship with 1/1000th of a g can make it to mars in 145 days.



Related News Links:

[url=http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/technology/artificial_gravity_041125.html]www.space.com

news.corporate.findlaw.com

[edit on 4-5-2005 by LeftBehind]

[edit on 4-5-2005 by LeftBehind]

[edit on 4-5-2005 by LeftBehind]

[edit on 4-5-2005 by LeftBehind]




posted on May, 4 2005 @ 09:06 PM
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Actually if the Solar Sail plan pans out that 3 years journey gets cut down to a 1 month journey.



posted on May, 4 2005 @ 09:54 PM
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It appears that they are still looking into a centrifugal type of gravity generation. While this will solve the gravity generation issue for a space station, it could actually hinder the time needed for a trip to Mars, by having to divert energy to keeping this system active and constant. Given current technology, most likely the spin of a spacecraft would be started by a thruster system, using the existing fuel on board the vessel. Since extra fuel would be needed to get the mass of the spacecraft spinning at the right velocity to simulate Earth gravity, it would increase the weight of a ship, and when fuel is a concern, this added weight could be detrimental to the performance of the vessel.

I feel that it can be achieved by a far simpler means, and using a lot less energy than conventional thrusters, and not requiring a spinning of the space craft. I have doing a little theoretical research on a concept to do this more effectively, and I believe it can be done, with minimal energy expenditure. The days of Star Trek style gravity generation may not be that far off.



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