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US Human Rights Violations Under the Radar

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posted on May, 1 2005 @ 12:23 PM
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It's been known that the US flies its "terror suspects" all around the world, dropping them off at various locations to be "interrogated." Well, it seems this tactic is good for one thing...avoiding accusations of human rights abuses. The US can simply drop the "terror suspect" off at a country known to regularly abuse and even kill its prisoners. That way the "interrogation" is done under the radar. What a coincedence, that seems to be exactly what the US is doing!


Seven months before Sept. 11, 2001, the State Department issued a human rights report on Uzbekistan. It was a litany of horrors.

The police repeatedly tortured prisoners, State Department officials wrote, noting that the most common techniques were "beating, often with blunt weapons, and asphyxiation with a gas mask." Separately, international human rights groups had reported that torture in Uzbek jails included boiling of body parts, using electroshock on genitals and plucking off fingernails and toenails with pliers. Two prisoners were boiled to death, the groups reported. The February 2001 State Department report stated bluntly, "Uzbekistan is an authoritarian state with limited civil rights."

Now there is growing evidence that the United States has sent terror suspects to Uzbekistan for detention and interrogation, even as Uzbekistan's treatment of its own prisoners continues to earn it admonishments from around the world, including from the State Department.

The so-called rendition program, under which the Central Intelligence Agency transfers terrorism suspects to foreign countries to be held and interrogated, has linked the United States to other countries with poor human rights records. But the turnabout in relations with Uzbekistan is particularly sharp. Before Sept. 11, 2001, there was little high-level contact between Washington and Tashkent, the Uzbek capital, beyond the United States' criticism.


Original Source

You can read the full text here:
www.libertyforum.org... t=&Board=news_international&Number=293578024#Post293578024

Ok, I'm going to stand by now for the stereotypical, "If they are terrorists, they deserve to be tortured argument" now. Because remember, there is no court to say whether they are a terrorist or not. These are simply people being shipped to a backwards country to be tortured for an indefinite amount of time.




posted on May, 1 2005 @ 12:29 PM
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Sometimes its necessary to do what you got to do. But I doubt that the US is actually flying people to other countries to get them tortured there. It would be a waste of money and man power, and a waste of time especially if the info is time sensitive.



posted on May, 1 2005 @ 12:30 PM
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Jamuhn
Your last paragraph nails it.

I don't necessarily disagree with torture as a form of punishment, or to extract information. I don't necessarily agree with it either..bear with me.

They are not terrorists until they've been proven to be such in a court of law. Until then, you're absolutely right, they're just people, and as people, they deserve the same rights as others.

This is a clear case (many cases) of dodging the law to serve an agenda.

It's necessary for the perpetrators to remember, nothing they do will be forgotten.

And remember the Shah.



posted on May, 1 2005 @ 12:30 PM
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and what should be done with them? put them in the hilton, give them champagne and caviar and say "if your a good person you'll tell us if your a terrorist". Oh I know! lets give non-american citizens american rights! That'll work.
Remember these people are captured in suspected terrorist havens, it's not like the US is taking people off the street and throwing them in jail. Are you sure about prisoner executions? i have heard nothing this extreme. I have heard they rough them up a little but a least were not sawing off heads and hands.



posted on May, 1 2005 @ 12:34 PM
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Nobody said anything about giving them rights as America citizens, at least I didn't.

There are universal rights people all over the globe have. Don't you remember one of the key justifications for this war was to stop Hussein from torturing his citizens? So we'll torture them instead?

The logic eludes me.

When he tortures to secure his future, he's a terrorist. When we torture to secure our future, it's righteous and justified.

I'm sorry, but that sort of holier than thou attitude won't fly in rational company.



posted on May, 1 2005 @ 12:35 PM
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Originally posted by Trustnone
and what should be done with them? put them in the hilton, give them champagne and caviar and say "if your a good person you'll tell us if your a terrorist". Oh I know! lets give non-american citizens american rights! That'll work.
Remember these people are captured in suspected terrorist havens, it's not like the US is taking people off the street and throwing them in jail. Are you sure about prisoner executions? i have heard nothing this extreme. I have heard they rough them up a little but a least were not sawing off heads and hands.


C'mon now, you must be one of those guys who tries to find the most extreme opposite case if someone disagrees with a statement. "Eww, I don't like that spaghetti" OHHH...You don't like spaghetti?! WELLLL, You must just want to eat a bag full of crap then!

You see, it makes no sense, and neither do your first couple sentences. These people deserve to be tried in any court of law. There is nothing and noone to say who these people really are. For all we know, they are just picking up people and throwing them to the lions.

And the State Department reported that they actually are boiling their prisoner's in Usbekistan. Last time I checked, that could be considered a human rights violation. Just hope you are never picked up as a terrorist and shipped to be boiled alive. And remember, the harder you scream you are not a terrorist, the harder they will beat you to shut you up.



posted on May, 1 2005 @ 02:24 PM
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"These people deserve to be tried in any court of law."

Not true, the United States needs to stop taking prisoners. Shoot them where they surrender. When you take prisoners, you have the responsibility of caring for them. Without prisoners, everyone doing mp duties and administrative duties in prisons are then freed to actually participate in the fight. I believe we need to advertise that we no longer will be taking prisoners and then show our enemies that we mean what we say. Make our enemies realize that by declaring war on us, they are declaring genocide on themselves. Hose them down with pig blood, then kill them!!

[edit on 5-1-2005 by groingrinder]

[edit on 5-1-2005 by groingrinder]



posted on May, 1 2005 @ 02:32 PM
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Originally posted by Trustnone
Remember these people are captured in suspected terrorist havens, it's not like the US is taking people off the street and throwing them in jail.


Not always....



In September, 2002, Maher Arar, a Syrian-born Canadian citizen travellng with a Canadian passport had to cut short a vacation in Tunisia with his wife and two small children. He was returning home to Ottawa alone. While connecting through New York's JFK, he was detained by U.S. immigration officials, questioned repeatedly about links to Al-Qaeda, then placed in a Brooklyn jail before finally being deported to Syria, even though he asked to be returned to Canada. He was held without charge in a Syrian prison for over a year where he claims he was tortured.

TA-ANALYSIS: U.S. Government being sued by Syrian-Canadian


You don't have to be in a terrorist haven to be the subject of an extraordinary rendition.



posted on May, 1 2005 @ 02:34 PM
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Hey Duzey, but according to groingrinder, we should have just shot the guy on site. Great world we live in....



posted on May, 1 2005 @ 03:01 PM
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Originally posted by Jamuhn
Hey Duzey, but according to groingrinder, we should have just shot the guy on site. Great world we live in....


Hmmm. That could have the added benefit of making the security lines at the airports move a lot faster. It would also reduce the amount of pesky lawsuits.

And yes, that was sarcasm you detected.

On a historical note, Bill Clinton gave these power to the CIA in 1998, and George Tenet testified in the 9-11 commission in September 2002 that, previous to 9-11, the US had performed over 70 such 'renderings'.

www.fas.org...



posted on May, 1 2005 @ 09:47 PM
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Not the first time ive heard that America drops off foreign nationals to their home country for imprisonment. Infact many of the foriegn nationals held by the US and UK are free to go back to their home of origin at any time.

The US certainly does not do this to thier own nationals. The US does not conduct any unlawful interorgations - the third parties conduct themselves how ever they please.

The UK has stipulated that if it does release their foreign nationals to countries like Egypt and Syria they want guarantees that they wont be tortured.

I am certain these so called "pick up" teams who operate using lear jets are perfectly within international law and are operating within the national interest of the united states.




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