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Russia to Deliver 2 Boomers in 2006 With New SLBMs(launch sub version of TOPOLs)

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posted on May, 1 2005 @ 07:12 AM
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The Russian Navy has announced that 2006 will see the deployment of two new strategic nuclear missile submarines (SSBNs, a.k.a. "boomers") armed with SS-NX-30 Bulava sea-launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs), a sea-launched variant of their new land-based SS-27 Topol-M ICBM. One sub will be a restored Typhoon Class vessel, while the other will be a new SSBN class design.

The Project 955 or Borey is a new SSBN designed to replace the Typhoon and Delta IV submarines in service with the Russian Navy. Borey Class submarines reportedly incorporate a number of new advances, including improved quietness and the ability to carry 12-20 of the new SS-NX-30 submarine launched ballistic missiles (SLBMs).

The TK-208 "Dmitry Donskoi" is a Project 941 (Typhoon) class submarine, six of which were deployed from 1981-1989 at the end of the Cold War. Since their original SS-N-20 missiles have reached the end of their service lives, all Project 941 submarines have been withdrawn from service except for the "Dmitry Donskoi," which has been used as a test platform for the SS-NX-30 missile and has been refitted for the system. It will re-enter active service in 2006.

In March 2004, construction begun in Severodvinsk on a second Borey Class sub, the "Alexander Nevsky". Though details are sketchy, the Russian Navy reportedly plans to procure up to 12-16 of these submarines through 2020. However, the future of the entire program and its final specifications remain uncertain owing to Russia's political and budgetary situation. There is little question, however, that the Borey Class subs are currently the highest priority in the Russian fleet.


The Russian SS-NX-30 Bulava, is an intercontinental-range, submarine launched, solid propellant ballistic missile. It is a submarine launched version of the SS-27 Topol-M, which represents the pinnacle of Russian ballistic missile technology.

www.defenseindustrydaily.com...




posted on May, 1 2005 @ 07:35 AM
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Will these new subs be any match for american type subs?

Also how do they plan to afford to buy 20 or so of these subs when there armys are low on budget as well????

Will this end up being a withdrawn project like so many others?



posted on May, 1 2005 @ 06:15 PM
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Russia is set to begin testing the Bulava SLBM in 2004 on a Typhoon-class submarine, Moskovsky said. The missile is then set to be installed on three Borey-class submarines, which are scheduled to be operational by 2010, he said.

Each Borey-class submarine will be armed with 12 Bulavas, Russian defense industry sources said. Each Bulava, designed to have a range of more than 8,300 kilometers, is expected to be equipped with multiple warheads, according to Jane's.

The Borey-class submarine has a displacement of 17,000 tons, measures 170 meters in length and has a crew of 130, Jane's reported. The submarine is equipped with both a nuclear reactor for high speeds and a low-noise electric engine. The submarine is also equipped with the latest in underwater noise reduction measures, project officials said. (www.nti.org...)


I find it incredilbe that the with the retrofitted TYphoon class sub that Russia will only have 4 SSBN (even more incredilbe they only have the retro-fited typhoon is the only SSBN currently in service!!).

Even the UK has 4 SSBN's



posted on May, 1 2005 @ 06:21 PM
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Originally posted by minority2000uk
Will these new subs be any match for american type subs?


No. The Ohio Class SSBN's were a major reason the soviet union fell - they simply could not afford to produce a similar system. The existing Soviet subs are louder, and the SS-27 is far less capable than the Trident II - especially the D-5.




Also how do they plan to afford to buy 20 or so of these subs when there armys are low on budget as well????


Often times it is cheaper to build a new (or signifigantly upgrade old systems) than to continue to attempt to support older systems. This is especially true if it uses a common ICBM based missile. With the collapsing state of the Russian conventional forces - they see their nuclear forces as vital to the survival of their country. This is what gives them overwhelming supiorirty against, for example, China.



Will this end up being a withdrawn project like so many others?


I think it will continue in some form or another. The Russians have had an extremely hard time funding and supporting their older SSBN's, and given their importance I could see a lot of sacrifices bieng made to continue this more economical alternative.



posted on May, 4 2005 @ 05:01 PM
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The Russians are so hilarious. Their whole military is crumbling and their nukes are easy to steal, yet they want more ICBMs and Boomers.



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