Have I Disturbed Some One? (Revisited)

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posted on Oct, 4 2009 @ 09:13 PM
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reply to post by Valhall
 


Ambien is by far the worst in my opinion. That friend who had made the macaroni had previously been on ambien. She completely destroyed her bathroom on one of her sleepwalking experiences. That scared her bad enough that she tried the Tylenol PM.

Did you take any other medicine with it by chance? You say your back hurt, did you even use a back cream or take any allergy medicines that day? That would have increased the effects to the the Tylenol PM.




posted on Oct, 4 2009 @ 09:19 PM
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Nope, just Tylenol PM.



posted on Oct, 4 2009 @ 09:21 PM
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HAY my post is back, and a reply to it to boot.

I have no idea Val. I dont think Tylenol PM was supposed to cause sleepwalking, but you never know how a drug is going to effect you. I have sleepwalked on sudafed before. Im paranoid enough to not take anything beyond an ibuprofen unless my hubby is home. I never claimed to be normal though


[edit on 4-10-2009 by mrsdudara]



posted on Oct, 5 2009 @ 12:20 AM
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This is the most fascinating thread! I have to agree with those who say this would make a great book and an even better movie! Can't wait to hear more!!!!



posted on Oct, 5 2009 @ 10:00 PM
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I don't have anything helpful, or even interesting, to say... but I felt the need to at least publicly acknowledge how incredibly entertaining this thread is.
It's like a mystery novel, and after every page you read, you get a little more information in figuring out what's going on.



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 01:30 AM
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Thanks so much for the effort you've put into this fascinating thread over so long Valhall & Springer! I wasn't sure about posting this, but in light of your dedication, I decided its for the best, so...
Background: I've normally only "seen" things, clairvoyantly, in dreams, but for a while now I've been meditating on the feeling of significance that accompanies them & premonitions I've had, in order to bring the dreams on purpose. As a result, I sometimes see things whilst meditating now.
So, after getting to the end of this thread this am, thats what I did. 1st focussing on where Oklahoma is, then the images I could remember of your cool house & drifting into the right "place".
Results: I saw a woman briefly. Somewhere between 20ish & well preserved early 30s (guessing @24ish), slim, slightly angular features, confident seeming, blond hair, which I'm pretty sure was dyed, about jaw length in a shaggy style & wearing a charcoal grey dress with a white collar. The dress I thought of as "old fashioned", but now I'm thinking "traditional american" is a better description: loose in the torso, cinched @the waist, sleeves tightening onto forearms but not reaching wrists. The collar squared off horizontally below collar bones with a subdued lacy edge, integral not trimmed on. The dress had a subtle pattern in vertical lines; flowers I think, with a few tiny blobs of a lighter colour, maybe pink.
Her hairstyle & dress seemed incongruous, so I'm guessing she's someone contemporary in "fancy-dress" or maybe from the 60s, but as mrsdudara said, time is totally random for me too in this stuff.
I know this is very vague but thats because she saw me as I saw her & vanished in a split second. Thats all I could remember about her. What I didn't see was any surroundings, just her floating there noticing me. In keeping with the story so far, I'm thinking "librarian", but I've nothing to back that up, not really even a feeling.
There's a little more to tell. U2U me if you're interested. Once again, great thread



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 02:31 AM
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Sorry, when I said "this am", I meant Monday morning. I sleep days to work nights, so because I've not slept yet, it seems like "today" still
if that makes sense! So my seeing was the middle of Sunday night in Oklahoma. Just in case anything weird transpired!



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 04:34 AM
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Originally posted by Bunken Drum

I know this is very vague but thats because she saw me as I saw her & vanished in a split second. Thats all I could remember about her. What I didn't see was any surroundings, just her floating there noticing me. In keeping with the story so far, I'm thinking "librarian", but I've nothing to back that up, not really even a feeling.
There's a little more to tell. U2U me if you're interested. Once again, great thread


Very interesting. I will u2u as you have piqued my curiousity! Thank you for sharing.



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 09:16 AM
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Originally posted by Valhall
Thank you for sharing.
Where I live, we say that as a polite euphemism for "What a wierdo!"
Still, glad to return the piqued curiosity.
Had another go this Tuesday am. I saw a man peering over a grey painted solid wooden railing, like a balcony or porch, the latter if the ground sloped away so I was lower down than the ground floor of the house. It didn't look like any of the structures on your house though, that we've seen here anyway. It reminded me of the upper decks of old style passenger ships actually.
His face was pretty red & heavy set, with small features. He had snow white hair, very short on the sides, a little longer on top, in a side parting. No sign of recedeing hairline.
After a 2nd attempt, I got a flash of a series of letters, which has never happened before. I think they spelled "George", but I'm only 100% certain of the "orge" part.
Curiouser & curiouser...



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 12:10 PM
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Originally posted by Bunken Drum

Originally posted by Valhall
Thank you for sharing.
Where I live, we say that as a polite euphemism for "What a wierdo!"
Still, glad to return the piqued curiosity.
Had another go this Tuesday am. I saw a man peering over a grey painted solid wooden railing, like a balcony or porch, the latter if the ground sloped away so I was lower down than the ground floor of the house. It didn't look like any of the structures on your house though, that we've seen here anyway. It reminded me of the upper decks of old style passenger ships actually.
His face was pretty red & heavy set, with small features. He had snow white hair, very short on the sides, a little longer on top, in a side parting. No sign of recedeing hairline.
After a 2nd attempt, I got a flash of a series of letters, which has never happened before. I think they spelled "George", but I'm only 100% certain of the "orge" part.
Curiouser & curiouser...


Well, that's pretty interesting considering the original builder's name is Fred Brown and his brother was George Brown.

The following is from interviews done on what was called the "Chisolm Trail Pioneer Project" (if I'm remembering the title correctly). You can read about their history. Note (AND I JUST NOTICED THIS FOR THE FIRST TIME) Fred died of a heart attack in his bed in my house.



Fred said in a WPA interview: "I came to Oklahoma in 1886 over the old Chisholm Trail from Texas. I camped east of the Duncan store in a dugout for some time, then moved down below Comanche and have been here ever since. I ran about seven thousand head of cattle. Of course, it was under an Indian for everyone who held cattle had to be under an Indian. In fact, everything was under Indian control at that time. Hick Harrison was our Indian. He claimed all land or had charge of it. When they knocked him out it cost me $1000.00 to pay up.

We drove our cattle over the Chisholm Trail. Sometimes a bunch of cattlemen all threw together and had the same chuck wagon; in this way we cut our expenses down. You see we had to drive to Nocona, Texas, as it was our nearest shipping point then. Later we went to Belcher. Pres Addington went to Carlyle. He had as many as ten thousand head.

There were Indians here but they were Comanches. They would string out one behind the other for miles. Our settlement was called Tucker. It had a store, blacksmith shop, gin and an old mill.

After the railroad came through most all the people moved to the railroad, The Rock Island built a switch and laid out a townsite. Then the main street fronted the railroad. The first depot was an old freight car.

Comanche received its name from the Comanche tribe of Indians. They came here and camped around the place when their grass money was due. They stayed around until they spent most of the money,

There was a saloon just about the 98th Meridian where many of the Indians got rid of their money. They would come up to you and say, "Give me a quatah - me want a drink - make me feel good."

They did not stop to cook meat often. As soon as a beef was killed they would dive in and drink the blood. I asked one why they drank so much blood and he told me that blood made him strong.

Back in the early days Comanche started having carnivals. These Indians came over and took part in the exercises. They put on their war paint and had their old war dances, giving all sorts of Indian yells. They never hurt anyone. We treated them well. In the early days before Tucker started we received mail from Henrietta by a man on a horse. He came by Suggs ranch. We received mail once a week when the creek was not up, then it took longer. We were lucky to get a paper once a month.

Pres Addington ran the Keen O brand. My brand was the Pitchfork. There were several brands, 3 I, the Bar, H & W, Fleetwoods, then Colbert Bowen."

Later, in the mid-1930's, the Oklahoma Highway Department was instructed by the state legislature to determine the true route of the Chisholm Trail through Oklahoma and show that route on future highway maps. This was done. Much of the information came from interviews with pioneer residents of the areas close to the trail. Fred Brown was listed as one of those who shared their knowledge to accurately locate the old trail route through Oklahoma.

Another pioneer interviewed by the WPA was George A. Brown of Chickasha (no relation to the Fred Brown Family). This George Brown came up the Chisholm Trail in 1890 as a cowboy. When he arrived in Indian Territory, he was offered a job by Fred Brown at a better salary ($45 a month) and joined the Pitchfork Ranch. The interview went on to make several comments on the ranch and the Brown family.

According to the interview, Fred Brown and his brother George Bundy Brown were partners in the ranch. The Pitchfork Ranch was one and a half miles east of present day Duncan, Oklahoma. The ranch headquarters was one and a half miles south of the Duncan store. George A. Brown went on to say "The Brown brothers brand was a pitchfork on the left hip (a graphic of a three-tined fork pointing up was included in the interview). They had between eight and ten thousand head of cattle, and around five thousand head of horses. They had a small horse pasture at the ranch headquarters, the rest of the ranch was open country, incidentally it took several cowboys to keep the cattle and horses from straying, and to do the branding of the cattle and horses. There was a big round corral on the ranch that was used to catch and brand the horses, but all of the cattle were branded in the open. We would round up about a thousand head of cattle in one bunch and several cowboys would hold the cattle together, while about five good ropers would ride in the herd, and rope the calves around the neck, and drag them out to the big log branding fire, where there would be several men to bull-dog the calves, while others branded and marked them.

My main job was to break horses. The mares were all little Spanish mares crossed with Steel Dust and Morgan horses. The offspring of this cross made excellent cow horses, and also good work horses. Some times, these geldings would be sold on a contract before they were broken. I remember once, George Brown, the eldest of whom I worked for, came to me and said he had sold three carloads of broke geldings to some man in Florida, and for me to break that many horses just as soon as I could. I only rode some of the horses six or seven times, so it did not take very long. We had one outlaw horse on the ranch, that we called Cyclone, that had never been ridden by anyone but me. He would buck just as long as he could, then rest a while and start bucking again. I begged Mr. Brown to take this horse to Florida with the others, but he said no, we need him to test out the new cowboys we hire. When we started south with the broken horses, I saw "Old Cyclone" grazing near me, and I rode out and threw him in the bunch. When we got to Belcherville, Texas with our horses which was the nearest shipping point at that time, Mr. Brown was there and scolded me for bringing "Old Cyclone" but he took him along anyway.

We bought a few things at Mr. and Mrs. Duncan's country store, but we freighted the most of our supplies from Belcherville, Texas, with four head of horses. We crossed Red river at the Cable Crossing, twelve miles east and six miles south of Ryan, Oklahoma on a ferry boat operated by Jess Kimble.

I worked for the Brown brothers for four years or until 1894. While I was there the Rock Island railroad company built road south and Mr. and Mrs. Bill Duncan moved their little store to the railroad and built the first store building in what is now Duncan.

When I quit working on the ranch, I started in business for myself, buying, selling and trading horses and cattle. The grass was good, and there was plenty of it. Many mornings when the dew was on the grass a person would get wet up to his waist while riding horseback in it."

A 1938 interview with an A. J. Johnston says, "There was much ranch land around Duncan and a great many cattle. Fred Brown owned the Pitchfork Ranch southeast of Duncan; The reason he called it the Pitchfork Ranch was because that was his brand."

These interviews and other similar ones show that Fred Brown was truly a pioneer in the Oklahoma area.

He related later that the Indians came through the neighborhood in town regularly to sell meat, both beef and pork. This went well until he go some rancid meat and decided to stop trading with the Indians. The next time they came around, he said that he didn't want any because they had sold him bad meat. That night, they cut off the ears of all his cattle. After that, he just pretended that he wanted what they did not have. If they were selling beef, he would say "Me no savvy beef today, me savvy pork." If they had pork, he would say "Me no savvy pork today, me savvy beef." That way he did not hurt their feelings and everything was fine.

Fred Arthur BROWN died on 30 Jan 1949 at Comanche, Stephens County, Oklahoma, at age 83. The Duncan Daily Banner said, "Fred A. Brown, 83, pioneer Indian Territory resident and founder of the Farmer's Gin in Comanche, was found dead in bed at his Comanche home Sunday morning. He had suffered a heart attack the previous evening.

He was born in Walpole, N. H., September 26, 1865, and moved in 1882 to the vicinity of what is now Comanche. He entered the cattle business, and married the former Clara A. Brockway of Fowler, Ind., december 15, 1892. She died about 12 years ago. Brown founded the Farmer's Gin in 1906, and managed it 37 years before retiring in 1943.



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 12:18 PM
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In addition I have found the following about Fred's children (note that Francis (who is the little girl in the old picture of my house) died in 1901. So my house is older than we have previously dated it because up until now we have dated that picture at ca 1904.


Francis Elizabeth5 BROWN was born on 24 Mar 1896 at Comanche, Indian Territory.

Francis Elizabeth's father, Fred A. Brown, wrote the following letter to his sister-in-law, Laura Brockway Smith: "Wednesday morning, 3/25/96. Mrs. W. J. Smith, Fowler, Ind. Dear Sister, Clara wants me to announce the arrival of Francis Elizabeth Brown (to you). She arrived at 1 o'clock yesterday P.M. She is a dandy, weighs 7 1/2 lb dressed. Got my dark blue eyes and the blackest hair. Clara and the baby are getting along nicely so far. Arthur is helping my to write to Aunt Laura. Yours with love to all, F. A. Brown."

Francis Elizabeth BROWN died on 23 Jun 1901 at Comanche, Indian Territory, at age 5. Little Francis died of whooping cough. Her obituary read, "With Jesus -- It was God's pleasure to call to His bosom one of his chosen ones. Francis Brown, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Brown, passed out of this life into the keeping of her Creator. Yesterday, while all the earth was under the solumn benediction of a Sabbath day, loving hands laid her to rest. God gave her to you, dear parents, and God has taken her away. Do not grieve." She was buried at Comanche, Stephens County, Oklahoma. The tombstone inscription from Comanche Cemetery reads, "Our Darling Frances E. daughter of F. A. and C. A. Brown. Born March 24, 1896, Died June 23, 1901. How beautiful to be with God."



Harry Lee5 BROWN was born on 25 Oct 1898 at Comanche, Indian Territory. He was a farmer and was elected to County treasurer.

Harry Lee BROWN was mentioned in the will of his grandmother Francis Louise BUNDY written on 9 Mar 1905 at Fowler, Benton County, Indiana, with a bequest of $50. He appeared on the census of 18 Apr 1910 in the household of Fred Arthur BROWN at Comanche, Stephens County, Oklahoma, age 11. He married Faye Myrtus PECK, daughter of Patrick Henry PECK and Belle PASCHAL, on 4 Sep 1918 at Comanche, Stephens County, Oklahoma. He died on 19 Oct 1933 at Duncan, Stephens County, Oklahoma, at age 34. He was buried at Comanche, Stephens County, Oklahoma.



Mary Hazel5 BROWN was born on 29 Sep 1902 at Comanche, Indian Territory.

Mary Hazel BROWN was mentioned in the will of her grandmother Francis Louise BUNDY written on 9 Mar 1905 at Fowler, Benton County, Indiana, with a bequest of $50. She appeared on the census of 18 Apr 1910 in the household of Fred Arthur BROWN at Comanche, Stephens County, Oklahoma, age 7. She appeared on the census of 20 Jan 1920 in the household of Fred Arthur BROWN at Comanche, Stephens County, Oklahoma, age 17.

Mary Hazel BROWN married John Elmer ROPER Sr., son of William Henry ROPER and Saphronia Annie SCRUGGS, on 21 Jun 1921 at Comanche, Stephens County, Oklahoma.

Mary Hazel BROWN died on 30 May 1972 at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, at age 69. She was buried on 1 Jun 1972 at Fairlawn Cemetery, Comanche, Stephens County, Oklahoma.


Their oldest son's name was Arthur M. Brown (he is the one they built the house next door to us for when he got married). He lived until 1980 and died in a nursing home in another town.

This is actually a lot more information on the original builder than I have ever read before.

[edit on 10-6-2009 by Valhall]



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 01:49 PM
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Wow, thanks Val! Thats pretty amazing stuff. i'd always kind of assumed that independent cattle ranching had died out to big business as soon as the railroads arrived. Amazing to think that people still did that only 80yrs ago. My gran & great aunt (whom I knew well) were alive then! They were from Liverpool tho, so their lives were very different.
If I am tuning in, as it were, to the earliest times of your house, that makes me wonder about the woman I saw 1st. Maybe she didn't have a modern hairstyle, but just short for convenience & with grease & a bit of dirt in it, rather than products?
I'm going to pursue the psychic enquiries... Ha! I'm so sceptical its silly, but I cant deny the experiences I've had!
I wonder if there are any photos of either of those George Browns? It'd be cool to know if I'm on track or just hallucinating!

Also, Brown really was the name of the bloke that built your house? I ask because there was another name you made up earlier, for privacy, I'm guessing?
Best to you & yours...



posted on Oct, 6 2009 @ 02:09 PM
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Yes, Fred A. Brown is the real name of the original owner.



posted on Oct, 8 2009 @ 03:04 AM
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Hi Val. I don't post very often at all, but I had to comment here. I have been following this thread for a long time and have read every post on it. It has been interesting, intriguing and entertaining. Thank you for keeping this thread going over the years.



posted on Oct, 11 2009 @ 08:52 AM
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Hey Val, do you think the Harry Lee Brown has any connection to your Harry Potter book incident, or just coincidence?



posted on Oct, 30 2009 @ 02:26 AM
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Hey Val,

I have not paid much attention to the site due to a recent death in the family. I was just wondering if there was anything new or interesting going on. Well hope all is well



posted on Oct, 30 2009 @ 04:58 AM
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Hi Littlemiss,

I don't think there is a connection, but who knows anymore...lol.

Howdy Fish!

Thank you for checking in. All's quiet on the western front.

[edit on 10-30-2009 by Valhall]



posted on Nov, 10 2009 @ 06:29 PM
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Well so much for my psychic abilities. I've been rushed off my feet & too tired to try tuning in to your house. I've got some peace coming up soon tho so maybe I'll get a chance. Glad all's well



posted on Jun, 18 2010 @ 07:30 AM
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My daughter has taken a video...two nights ago, that as soon as she gets it transferred to me, I would like you guys to view and give your opinion on. It was taken in the same location, next to the side door, that the KII meter session was conducted with the "little boy".

I'll get it linked to you as soon as I get it and have it uploaded. Look forward to reading your thoughts on this one.



posted on Jun, 18 2010 @ 09:32 AM
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Can't wait to see the video. I've been wondering how things have been in the house.... it's been awhile since we've had an update. Be sure to let us know about any new activity along with your video.

By the way, did you ever do any more sessions with the meter thingy?






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