It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

(news) Chinese Journalist Jailed Over Internet Posting

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 06:52 PM
link   
A Chinese journalist accused of leaking state secrets by posting a central government gag order forbidding all internal media organisations from marking the 15th anniversary of post Tiananmen Square crackdown has been sentenced to ten years in jail. The journalist, Shi Tao posted the gag order on a foreign dissident website after the documents were read during an editorial meeting which he attended. The participants in the meeting were warned that the contents were classified according to the court.
 



www.abc.net.au
Shi admitted he sent an abstract of the order to an overseas dissident web site last April, but maintained the order did not constitute a "state secret".

He was arrested in November.

The Paris-based media watchdog Reporters Without Borders (RSF) had denounced Shi's trial and called for his immediate release.

China defines state secrets broadly, allowing the Government to arrest anyone for revealing a wide spectrum of information it finds sensitive.

According to the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists, at least 42 journalists were locked up in Chinese prisons at the end of 2004, making China the biggest jailer of journalists in the world.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


The main contents were emailed and published in an overseas publication and several other international websites.

It is believed that thousands of Chinese were killed in the post Tiananmen Square crackdown when the Chinese military raided the capital city. Since that time there has been an internal media blackout on reporting or acknowledgement of the incidences.


[edit on 30-4-2005 by Mayet]




posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 06:54 PM
link   


It is believed that thousands of Chinese were killed in the post Tiananmen Square crackdown when the Chinese military raided the capital city


No its not. A few hundred maybe, but certainly not thousands. Change this and you will get one more Yes vote



posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 07:49 PM
link   

from WikiPedia.com
The protests of 1989 resulted in the killing of several thousand young Chinese in the square and adjacent areas and is thus sometimes called the Tiananmen Massacre.

Estimates of civilian deaths vary: 400-800 (New York Times & Hammond sources (users.erols.com...)), 2600 (Chinese Red Cross) and the Students maintain that over 7000 were killed. Injuries are generally held to have numbered from 7,000 to 10,000, including casualties among PLA troops.


No one can say for sure, but it's definintely in the thousands.

Zip



posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 08:59 PM
link   
It is widely quoted in International media nowdays as "Hundreds, Possibly Thousands", it is highly unlikely to be in the thousands killed. Read over your quote, injuries vary from 7000-10000, deaths are usually only a fraction of injuries, if thousands were killed then death would account for nearly half of injuries which is extremely unlikely.

Well back on topic, this news story was posted on Xinhua, a Chinese Government Run news agency, so China didn't even try to hide it. That might mean that he was specificially told not to spread classified news, and he did, therefore he broke the law.

[edit on 30-4-2005 by rapier28]



posted on May, 1 2005 @ 12:35 AM
link   
He is lucky that he didnt get the death penalty :X



posted on May, 1 2005 @ 12:57 PM
link   

Originally posted by rapier28
It is widely quoted in International media nowdays as "Hundreds, Possibly Thousands", it is highly unlikely to be in the thousands killed. Read over your quote, injuries vary from 7000-10000, deaths are usually only a fraction of injuries, if thousands were killed then death would account for nearly half of injuries which is extremely unlikely.

Well back on topic, this news story was posted on Xinhua, a Chinese Government Run news agency, so China didn't even try to hide it. That might mean that he was specificially told not to spread classified news, and he did, therefore he broke the law.



Thank you. Obviously I did read over my quote before posting it. I am going with the Red Cross' estimate.

Zip



posted on Sep, 12 2005 @ 08:16 AM
link   



posted on Sep, 12 2005 @ 08:23 AM
link   
I have to say, theres some really weird stuff going on with Chinese press blackouts. Now if it's a state secret thats being revieled, then sure he's breaking the law. But I've noticed that there have been a lot of press blackouts in China going on, and to be honest I'd like to know exactly what the Chinese have been hiding.



posted on Sep, 13 2005 @ 04:26 AM
link   
WOW, this is a blast from the past. I saw this on the main page of ATSNN on the forums and didn't remember posting that story and thought FredT had done the Yahoo Chinese jailing one. www.abovetopsecret.com...

Now I remember posting it. I am glad to see the old article pop back up and reference a new one. It give a new twist on the subject that is for sure.



posted on Sep, 13 2005 @ 06:30 AM
link   
Of course Mayet.

That was my intention. I think to many ATS posters has 3 second memory.



new topics

top topics



 
0

log in

join