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Were is the support now?

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posted on Apr, 29 2005 @ 09:47 PM
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OK I'm sick and tired of people telling me to "Support the Troops".
So I have a question for those "Support the Troops" criers.
How do you "support the troops"?

So you "support the troops" huh? Pls read this:


The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) estimates that more than 299,000 veterans are homeless on any given night; more than 500,000 experience homelessness over the course of a year. Conservatively, one out of every three homeless adult males sleeping in a doorway, alley, box, car, barn or other location not fit for human habitation in our urban, suburban and rural communities has served our nation in the Armed Forces. It is estimated that as many as three-quarters of veterans experiencing homelessness also have an addiction and/or mental illness.


That's how we support the troops.

Did any of those vets have mental health problems before joining the military?
Were any of them homeless before joining the military? I doubt it. I don't think I have to explain why.

www.nchv.org...

Now some more:


Lou Gehrig’s Cases Skyrocket Among Gulf War Vets Statistics Show Nearly 100% increase since 1997


www.gulfweb.org...

Hmmm something going on here?


As many as 100,000 of the 700,000 U.S. soldiers who served in the Gulf War complain of symptoms [of Gulf War Syndrome], which many attribute to exposure to chemicals.


archives.cnn.com...

I have symptoms Gulf War Syndrome.

So were is the support now?

All you're doing when you say "support your troops" is easing your guilt of knowing you are willingly allowing your government to send young men to their death, for what?
For money, for power, for oil, for control. Many many reasons but the ones they feed us on a daily basis. Look up rote learning.

We are nothing but Guinea pigs to the pigs. Used and discarded.
Is there a conspiracy here? Could it be, give the troops shots that will make them sick later in their life? Then they are forced to use the V.A. for their health. The V.A. buys drugs with government money from the pharmaceuticals. You scratch my back....Maybe a stretch?

Where is the support now?

Discuss...

[edit on 29/4/2005 by ANOK]




posted on Apr, 29 2005 @ 10:17 PM
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Actually a lot of that does resemble me in some ways.

I did spend quite a while homeless after I got out of the military. I am mentally ill, to some extent. At least they pay me monthly for it, I don't know.

One way to support our troops is to give blood, however I will never be allowed to give whole blood again due to the numerous countries I visited while I was in the military. So I just write letters and such.

What bothered me a lot in my recent stint of being a civilian Army recruiter was all of those little yellow ribbon magnets you see on all these cars. Except none of them are actually willing to BE in the Army or anything, they just want to put a magnet on their car.

I guess the three bucks you spend on the magnet, probably $.80 of which actually goes to the support of the troops in some unknown, probably useless way is all anyone needs to do to feel like they're supporting something. Or someone.

Hey, whatever man.



posted on Apr, 29 2005 @ 11:06 PM
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Don't assume that just because somebody "supports the troops" with yellow ribbons that they don't feel they should be involved themselves.

For example someone who doesn't medically qualify, etc.



posted on Apr, 29 2005 @ 11:09 PM
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Originally posted by JoshGator54
Don't assume that just because somebody "supports the troops" with yellow ribbons that they don't feel they should be involved themselves.

For example someone who doesn't medically qualify, etc.


Ah yes. I am very familiar with unqualified applicants. 3 out of 4 17 to 21 year olds are unqualified, mostly due to prescription drug use.



posted on Apr, 29 2005 @ 11:11 PM
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Originally posted by DeltaChaos

Originally posted by JoshGator54
Don't assume that just because somebody "supports the troops" with yellow ribbons that they don't feel they should be involved themselves.

For example someone who doesn't medically qualify, etc.


Ah yes. I am very familiar with unqualified applicants. 3 out of 4 17 to 21 year olds are unqualified, mostly due to prescription drug use.



I was personally denied entrance for a very stupid reason, and there was no way they were letting me in. I had scoliosis (slightly curved spine) as a child, which was corrected by surgery. No reason on earth I couldn't have served.



posted on Apr, 29 2005 @ 11:40 PM
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So your saying their is no other way to serve the troops without actually enlisting?? What about all the people who are at home making sure you can fight, they are just as important! Support need not necessarily mean joining the forces; any form of support is considered support. If everybody joined the military then America would be one big barrack.
When I was in college I was asked to join the military but I felt I had a greater aptitude in engineering and so I stuck with my course, I feel I can help my country more as an engineer than as a soldier. My father worked in the airforce as a military neurosurgeon so joining the military isn't something I am not familiar with!



posted on Apr, 29 2005 @ 11:43 PM
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Originally posted by JoshGator54

Originally posted by DeltaChaos

Originally posted by JoshGator54
Don't assume that just because somebody "supports the troops" with yellow ribbons that they don't feel they should be involved themselves.

For example someone who doesn't medically qualify, etc.


Ah yes. I am very familiar with unqualified applicants. 3 out of 4 17 to 21 year olds are unqualified, mostly due to prescription drug use.




I was personally denied entrance for a very stupid reason, and there was no way they were letting me in. I had scoliosis (slightly curved spine) as a child, which was corrected by surgery. No reason on earth I couldn't have served.



With the current recruiting probs, maybe theyll make an exception now... =P

Hopefully if all goes well, after i get some things taken care of im looking into enlisitng in the marine corp by the end of this year, my father was one, and its just something i wanna do.


Tis rather sad about all those vets on the streets, The treatment they get comming back from wars such as nam ect, up to today, sure doesnt help these guys mentaly either, they go through hell in combat, and then when they get back to whats suposed to be there home, they are ousted and shunned by all the anti-war american haters. called baby killers ect, thats gotta be a real mental boost..

[edit on 29-4-2005 by C0le]



posted on Apr, 29 2005 @ 11:50 PM
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Well Uncle Sam would have you not only support the troops, but also to support the war, I don't know about you guys but I see this as a disturbing contradiction in values. Support the troops, or support the war, but only a really gung ho sick bastard could support both and sleep well at night IMHO. What are we up to 1500 now? What good is some extra razors and a come home soon card going to do for those guys? If you want to really support the troops, send them a plane ticket home and make the Bush administration apologise to each and every one of them for sending them over in the first place on his way to the Hague.



posted on Apr, 29 2005 @ 11:52 PM
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Originally posted by JoshGator54

I was personally denied entrance for a very stupid reason, and there was no way they were letting me in. I had scoliosis (slightly curved spine) as a child, which was corrected by surgery. No reason on earth I couldn't have served.


That's interesting. I have scoliosis also. Didn't know till I went to MEPS for my physical. Still let me in though. Not that serious in my case I guess.
I always thought I leaned to one side a little though....LOL

[edit on 29/4/2005 by ANOK]



posted on Apr, 29 2005 @ 11:56 PM
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Well said twitchy, Amen to that!



posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 12:00 AM
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You guys always love to bring up the death stats, 1500 dead americcans does suck, no question whatsoever, But look at it from a war/military standpoint, Thats pretty low..

Also, these men and wemon, signed up knowing full well they could one day be called uopn and could very well die doing ther jobs, THEY knew this, it is there job.

Stop throwing up the death stats, as if these guys didnt know what they were getting into when they signed the contract.

Rather the left wants to admit it or not the military is designed to kill thats why they give them guns, thats why they give them bullets, If anything this war is a good thing, its giving men combat exp, we prior to this war were running out of men who had combat exp, Just think how sol wed be if we waited another 20 years and went to war with one of these mid east countries, which have tons of exp in war, they grew up in a warzone... wed prolly suffer far more casualties then we have thus far..



posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 12:01 AM
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I "Support the troops" mostly because i am from a long line of veterans. I spent the first 20 years of my life in other countries, travelling from place to place never having a 'home' for more than 2 1/2 yrs. and then i packed my bags and moved. I can never give blood because of my possible exposure to mad cow disease. I dont have any 'roots' and all of my friends are spread accross the face of the planet. I had friends that blew their brains out, or tried to over-dose to death because they felt they couldn't take it. I have post-traumatic stress disorder from my time living on base. When i first got into more of civilian life i couldn't adapt for the longest time. My father is permanently disabled because of his time in the military and my grandfather hs scars all over his body from agent orange so what i have endured is meaningless to some vets, but all you civilian whining little babies, who had a home in one place or so all their life, live disease free, happy, little lives who bitch and moan about this war and shout 'end the war bring our boys home' dont know #. Your all a bunch of pampered civys, who instead of thanking and kissing our boots like you should be, you have the nerve to spit on vets and dishonor with your foul lies the very people who gave everything for you.
Show some damn respect!



posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 12:17 AM
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Hey, 38 republican senators just said "Kill our troops, we don't care." by voting against armor for our troops. All but 1 dem voted for it, 16 reps said no, and 1 Ind said yes. So nice the reps who started this war for oil love our men and women in Iraq.



posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 01:18 AM
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I apologise, how could I forget about Agent Orange?


Around 2.4 million U.S. Vietnam veterans and families have been exposed to Agent Orange. Until recently, many Vietnam veterans were unaware of the serious and potentially deadly Agent Orange side effects that could be suffered, including cancer, neurological disorders, diabetes, and other dangerous effects.


www.agent-orange-lawsuit.com...

www.agent-orange-lawsuit.com...

[edit on 30/4/2005 by ANOK]



posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 03:32 AM
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Couldn't agree more Trustnone



posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 04:17 AM
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you have no need to apologize, your right on about we need more support for our vets. They need more money just so they can feed,cloth, and buy medicines(which in most cases wouldnt even be neccesary if they had not served their country) They need free medicine. The vets with families need even more money. This may mean more taxes but i will gladly pay them if it goes directly to vets. My grandfather was just recently petioning to keep from having his benefits cut. I always give money to any vet raising funds. thankfully i can go to school thanks to Veterans Benefits.



posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 04:21 AM
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Illnesses and problems associated with war veterans are for the most part kept out of the media. This is done with the intention to keep such problems out of the minds of the public who are basically reactionary to issues they see and forget about almost immediately if they aren't brought to their attention in grand fashion.

Gulf War Syndrome and all other U.S./coalition veteran illnesses are never going to grab the public's attention and this is by government/media design. So you will never achieve the type of support you hope to have. The government isn't likely to ever admit the issues with depleted uranium. So I don't expect it to ever be in the media spotlight for any length of time. The compensation rates and criminal charges made home and abroad would literally break the bank of the federal government.

I will also note that Gulf War Syndrome, which is most likely a result of depleted uranium contamination, agent orange, and all other veteran afflictions are also cast upon the peoples who live in the war zones U.S. veterans were previously in. They never recieve any type of compensation or support at all and most suffer far more as a result of these things due to these terrible weapons thrown at them and then having to live in the affected areas after the war is over.

[edit on 30-4-2005 by Frith]



posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 04:29 AM
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The reality is that regardless of how you feel about the war, all americans support the troops.

No ribbon is needed, we all pay taxes.



posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 04:35 AM
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I agree with pretty much everything you said there Frith. But personally I think there's more to Gulf War Syndrome than depleted uranium.
I was in the Navy. I was in the Red Sea during Gulf war 1 for 8 months. I have Gulf Syndrome symptoms now as do other Navy vets (muscle pains, anxiety, depression, fatigue, respiratory problems, sleep problems, headaches). We were no where near any area with depleted uranium. But also our symptoms are not as severe as some of the ground troops.
Most vets didn't start showing symptoms until ten years after the 1st Gulf War, '90-'91.



posted on Apr, 30 2005 @ 04:35 AM
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Originally posted by LeftBehind
we all pay taxes.


Involuntarily. Well, I could stop, but I'm not one for jail.

[edit on 30-4-2005 by Frith]



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