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New Phase of Ice Might Exist

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posted on Apr, 25 2005 @ 06:42 PM
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www.livescience.com...


A new phase of ice may exist at high pressures and when temperatures are near absolute zero, between minus 452.5 and minus 369.7 degrees Fahrenheit (4 to 50 Kelvin), according to researchers at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center.


The team confirmed the density functional theory (DFT) calculations under these conditions which correctly account for the pre-edge feature of ice. However, quite unexpectedly they also obtained data indicating substantial spectral changes from ice IX, suggesting a significant change of the H2O framework in this P-T regime. In short, the exciting prospect of the formation of a possible new ice phase.

Science fiction readers have long been familiar with Kurt Vonnegut's fanciful version of ice-nine from his 1963 novel Cat's Cradle. In the novel, a Marine general wants a quick and easy solution to the problems posed by mud; a researcher finds a way to instantly crystalize the water in mud. Unfortunately, the fictional version of ice-nine did not stop with simply crystalizing the water in nearby mud.


a new ice phase huh???

great


i love winter


also:

www.physorg.com...

ENJOY!!!






posted on Apr, 25 2005 @ 09:21 PM
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When I read the topic, I immediately thought of Cat's Cradle.

Vonnegut is my hero...he is the only man I'd consider a genius.



posted on Apr, 25 2005 @ 10:19 PM
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At first I wondered why this mattered beyond "CHRIST THAT'S COOL!" but the REAL link was helpful in that matter (no pun intended). Hydrogen bonding, as well as water, could really use a lot more understanding, and anything that furthers the knowledge of the structure and behavior of the two is greatly significant.




posted on Apr, 26 2005 @ 07:42 AM
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H2O is a very basic molecular structure. Is it possible that other molecules containing hydrogen bonds are capable of the same transformation in structure.

'sorry sir, we are all out of the cold ice, you will have to use the worm stuff.'



posted on Apr, 26 2005 @ 07:53 AM
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Honestly, running DFT on three atom molecules is a TERRIBLE idea. There are all sorts of semi-empirical methods out there that have water's minimum being linear and ammonia being planar. DFT (I'm going to assume they're just using B3LYP), in particular, is pretty lousy for dispersion effects, so I wouldn't put much weight in the theory side of this paper. Is an actual reference available, or is this a case of desktop publishing (I don't see a reference anywhere in the article)?



posted on Apr, 26 2005 @ 08:53 AM
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Originally posted by utrex
Honestly, running DFT on three atom molecules is a TERRIBLE idea. There are all sorts of semi-empirical methods out there that have water's minimum being linear and ammonia being planar. DFT (I'm going to assume they're just using B3LYP), in particular, is pretty lousy for dispersion effects, so I wouldn't put much weight in the theory side of this paper. Is an actual reference available, or is this a case of desktop publishing (I don't see a reference anywhere in the article)?

Check the physorg link he gave.

Google and Citeseer show legitimate papers for Dr. Yong Q. Cai and they're in the fields you'd expect. I think it's an early announcement with papers to follow.

I don't see any evidence/support for their using DFT or B3LYP. It was confirmed by spectrometry. Nothing is mentioned about how they got there.



posted on Apr, 26 2005 @ 09:24 AM
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I found the relevant reference (Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 025502 (2005)). Why they don't say this in the linked article, I don't know.

The article summary is very misleading: as Byrd said, they've principally used spectroscopy in this paper. The inclusion of theory, which the summary chooses to focus on, is merely tag-along to say they've done it (an extremely common practice in such papers nowadays).



posted on Apr, 26 2005 @ 04:02 PM
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glad to hear you love this info...

and glad to hear that you hate the negatives







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