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China's Hypocrisy: What Their Textbooks Don't Say.

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posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 02:12 PM
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Talk about a hypocritical political and governmental CONSPIRACY

With the recent months rash of anti-Japanese demonstrations in China over Japans aggressions against China during WWII and the recent release of a new Japanese history school textbook(s) that do not mention/recognize nor "apologize" for Japan's own 'horrific acts' in China, interestingly, China is playing the hypocritical game ohhhh so well. Chinese history textbooks fail to mention a number of their own 'horrific acts':



As China criticizes Japan for new textbooks that critics say minimize wartime abuses like the Japanese military forcing Asian women into sexual slavery, Beijing's own schoolbooks have significant omissions about the communist system's own history and relations with its neighbors.

Isn't interesting that while the Chinese are bashing and attacking Japanese for historical revisionism that they themselves are the greatest practitioners of this revisionism in the entire world? Must be that "nationalism" thing that is NOT restricted to Japan or the US, huh? The Japanese militarism that caused these 'horrific acts' in China are gone, while the Chinese government that has committed its own 'horrific acts' is still governing today. Ironic?

The Chinese school history textbooks leave out a number of things:


The books don't mention the brief but bloody 1962 border war with India that broke out when Chinese troops attacked Indian positions to enforce territorial claims.

There is nothing on the 1979 war when Chinese troops attacked Vietnam. The assault was ordered to punish Hanoi for ousting the murderous Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia, which was an ally of Beijing.

Also missing:

The 1989 crackdown on democracy demonstrations, when Chinese troops killed hundreds and possibly thousands of unarmed protesters.

The estimated 30 million Chinese who starved to death during the 1958-61 "Great Leap Forward," revolutionary leader Mao Zedong's attempt to speed up China's farm and factory output through mass collectivization.

What Chinese textbooks don't say

What is also left out:
The ongoing occupation of Tibet.
China's control over Mongolia.

I suppose that the above two will be seen and viewed as acts of 'liberation' and 'ancient' territorial acquisitions.....


Remember, in China, there are no demonstrations without government approval. We know one thing, "hypocrisy" rules when applied to nationalism, no matter the nation state, huh? This particular discussion wishes to visit China's own hypocritical stance when applied to the Japanese situation.

Past thread(s) on this:
New Japan history textbook. Watch out!!!
Thousands join anti-Japanese rally
China and Japan
Chinese Citizens Protest Japanese
China tightens Internet use -blocks political dissent




seekerof




posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 03:35 PM
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Strange this. Whilst we here on ATS require links etc to back up our claims, those said links provide nothing in the way of actual evidence to back up their claims.

Tha CNN link says:



Experts say China's textbooks are written to heighten a sense of national victimhood and glorify the Communist Party that seized power in a 1949 revolution and lashes out at any threat to its rule.


and



An eighth-grade history book used in Shanghai, China's most cosmopolitan city, repeatedly refers to Japanese by an insulting phrase that roughly translates as "Jap bandits."


Whilst not even providing any links, pictures, translations or even a name of the book concerned.

Are we supposed to just believe this because it is on the CNN website?

What, if anything, are they offering in support of their claims? "Experts" and "an eigth grade book" do not merit quality journalism without providing at least an image of these said texts/pictures that they mention.

I mean, what is the point of us being required to back ourselves up with links, if those links have nothing in them to back up their claims?

And all this on the back of the known aggressive stance the US has towards China and probably sticking up for it's friend Japan.

Personally, I have not met a Chinaman (and I have met a few) who denies the above and is ignorant of any of the facts, so personally I doubt that they omit any history.

In fact, it is known that the current Chinese leadership acknowledges the failures of the past, hence it's moves towards modernisation, capitalism and some level of democracy.

**Please note that I am not denying Chinese attrocities, I am just querying the veracity of these claims which have nothing at all in the way of substance, apart from the usual talking heads and nameless "experts"****



posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 04:12 PM
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stumason:


Are we supposed to just believe this because it is on the CNN website?

Reported by more than merely the voice of CNN.
Any search engine will suffice.



What, if anything, are they offering in support of their claims? "Experts" and "an eigth grade book" do not merit quality journalism without providing at least an image of these said texts/pictures that they mention.

Again, despite your persistance to what is claimed within this topic concerning Chinese own hypocrisy and history books, did you ask to see those Japanese history textbooks as your asking to see those Chinese history textbooks? Also, and again, a search engine will suffice, when used. I reported it, if you doubt the validity of the report(s), then please, by all means, feel free to provide to the contrary and counter them.




And all this on the back of the known aggressive stance the US has towards China and probably sticking up for it's friend Japan.

Stems further back than that.
Personally, you have your opinion, I simply presented that the Chinese stance is as hypocritical as the Japanese, k?



In fact, it is known that the current Chinese leadership acknowledges the failures of the past, hence it's moves towards modernisation, capitalism and some level of democracy.

Ermmm, no it has not.
Have they apologized or recognized their raping Tibet?
Have they apologized or recognized their raping Mongolia?
Have they apologized or recognized their killing nearly as many Chinese people as they claim the Japanese did [IMHO, I don't even think the Japanese had enough bullets in China at that time to kill 35,000,000 Chinese, but hey].
Have the Chinese apologized or recognized their aggressions against India?

The list can go on.




seekerof

[edit on 23-4-2005 by Seekerof]



posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 04:24 PM
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Your missing the point SeekerOf, as stated in my disclaimer at the bottom of my post I am not disputing that the Chinese did these things, just diputing the source of your accusations.

I am just voicing concern that whilst we are supposed to back up our claims with sources, the single source you provided did no such thing.

The onus isn't on me to back up your claims about chinese textbooks, so don't start telling me how to use Google. We all know your stance on China, Seeker, all I am saying is back it up better than a half arsed CNN report that contains little (if any) real information. It doesn't even have a name of any of these so called experts.

By all means, provide more links for us to review, I will be more than happy to believe it if better information is provided. All I am trying to do is get better constructed argument going using better sources, otherwise this will degenerate into another China vs US thread, with nationalistic hate mongering with little (if any) actual evidence to back up anyones claims.



posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 05:15 PM
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Stumason:


The onus isn't on me to back up your claims about chinese textbooks, so don't start telling me how to use Google. We all know your stance on China, Seeker, all I am saying is back it up better than a half arsed CNN report that contains little (if any) real information. It doesn't even have a name of any of these so called experts.


Please keep in mind what you have said, k, cause I want to point out something here on your challenging of this source, among other sources that can be found on this:

as posted by stumason
....Firstly, all news is biased in one way or another, and secondly, are you worried about the perceived bias just because you don;t agree with it? That in itself is bias, and you are being hypocritical in voting No just because you have a different view on things to someone else.

That shouldn't distract from the newsworthyness of the story itself. If you want to apply your own spin, then vote yes, and provide your own info to back up your side, don't shoot people down just because you get upset.

posted on 27-3-2005 at 10:46 AM

The above link was to an article which came from an Arab media site. Are you seeing a conflict or contradiction between what you said then and what your are saying now? I certainly am. Cause here, your contesting the article from CNN, among other sources that reported this articles mentions [AP, etc.] and then asking for more verifiable information or sourcings? Stumason, I have no access to Chinese history textbooks that are being used in classrooms in China. And in my searching online, there are none to be found, and yet, again, you ask for more proof to those "experts" claims and assertions, huh?

I'll keep looking, cause according to you, the "ONUS" is on me, and yet, I find it ironic that you can simply continue to contest me, the "experts", and the article, all the while, not providing anything remotely linkable to contest what is claimed. Thats irony to me, even though you assert I am missing the point. My apologies if I am missing your point, but I certainly think you have and are missing my point, along with what is being asserted by this article.



edited:correction of the spelling of stumason's name. Sorry, stumason.



seekerof

[edit on 23-4-2005 by Seekerof]



posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 05:52 PM
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Seeker, I am not disputing that China did these things, nor am I actually disputing that they include these things in there books, as like you, I do not have access to Chinese textbooks nor can I read Chinese. What i am disputing is the veracity of these claims, there actual truth and the suspect timing of this "news".

However... You have made these claims against China (with an established track record of railing against China at every given opportunity) with nothing to back up your claim.

Through your own admission, you do not have access nor can actually read these books and are basing your claims solely on a CNN claim that they exist. That claim in itself offers no proof, names or even a picture to back itself up, instead citing unamed "experts" as it's proof.

Needless to say, the timing of this report is suspect, and is probably aimed at boosting the Japanese image after a bruising couple of weeks in the international spotlight.



Are you seeing a conflict or contradiction between what you said then and what your are saying now?


No, not at all. If you actually look at that article in question, they cite names, sources etc to back up the crux of the story, namely that a high ranking Jew in the US Admin is dating a Muslim woman. Your CNN article does nothing to back up its claims, and cites nameless "experts" as it's source.



Stumanson, I have no access to Chinese history textbooks that are being used in classrooms in China. And in my searching online, there are none to be found, and yet, again, you ask for more proof to those "experts" claims and assertions, huh?


At the very least, CNN could have provided a name for one of these "experts" and some sort of image from the book.

After all, if this "expert" had access to this book (which they obviously did to come to their conclusion, assuming the "expert" really exists) then they would be able to produce images/links/ or at the very least a title of the book. None of these appear anywhere in the article.



I'll keep looking, cause according to you, the "ONUS" is on me, and yet, I find it ironic that you can simply continue to contest me, the "experts", and the article, all the while, not providing anything remotely linkable to contest what is claimed.


It is the manner in which it is claimed with the lack of corroborating stories/evidence/or sources and the timing of the claims in relation to US/Japanese/Chinese relations. I cannot provide any evidence to contest the claims made by CNN for probably the very same reason you cannot provide anything to back them up. Beacuse such evidence does not exist.



Thats irony to me, even though you assert I am missing the point. My apologies if I am missing your point, but I certainly think you have and are missing my point, along with what is being asserted by this article.



Don't get me wrong Seeker, I understand where your coming from and normally I wouldn't contest any links that people provide without good reason.

That being said, there is good reason to contest this one. I have checked several times and can find nothing to back up CNN/AP's claims and suspect that it is a well timed effort to boost Japanese PR ahead of their summit with China and in the aftermath of the whole textbook row in general.

As said, I am not contesting the deeds done by China, just the way in this claim has been presented and I am just trying to give a heads up to others that you should believe everything you hear on the news, especially when their is precious little eveidence to back up their claims.




posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 06:25 PM
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Yes, apparently source issues will prevail.
Links to sources to back said original article's allegations will undoubtedly go unheeded and dismissed. Of course, they will be discounted as having "veracity" issues.........

According to the NYT:


As a typical example, the NYT said Chinese textbooks "teach that Chinese resistance, not the United States, defeated Japan in the war; they say nothing of the postwar Great Leap Forward, in which some 30 million Chinese died because of Mao Zedong's misguided agrarian policies."

Japan's Textbooks More Balanced than Korea's: NYT

According to this AFP article on Chinese textbooks:


Ms. Min uses textbooks to teach her history classes, too. And the historical truth those texts impart is such that most Chinese college graduates believe China is a “peaceful country” that has only fought wars in self-defense. Why wouldn’t they think so? In Chinese history texts:

China’s participation in the Korean War from 1950-1953 is “dismissed in one sentence”.
There is no mention of the 1951 Chinese invasion and colonization of Tibet.
The 1962 Chinese attack on India? Not a word.
The 1979 invasion of Vietnam? Don’t ask, don’t tell.

The teacher, Ms. Min, admits to have only heard about some of these events “in passing”. She was never told about them at school. But still she asks, “Why does Japan distort its textbooks? They always want to cover up the historical truth, they always want to change. We can’t allow that.”

They use different texts for Chinese domestic history. In those books:

Mao Zedong’s Great Leap Forward, Cultural Revolution, and other purges that resulted in the deaths of tens of millions of Chinese are not studied at all, much less apologized for.
The same silent treatment is given to the massacre of hundreds, or thousands, of students at Tienanmen Square in 1989.

Do as I say, not as I do

Or according to this History News Network article:


Compare this to the situation in Premier Wen's China. There is only one acceptable version of history, at least at any given time; history often changes, but only when the Communist Party decides to change it.

For example, according to a report by Howard W. French in the New York Times last December, many textbooks don't mention that anyone died at what the outside world knows as the 1989 massacre of student demonstrators near Tiananmen Square. One 1998 text notes only that "the Central Committee took action in time and restored calm." Anyone who challenges the official fiction is subject to harsh punishment, including beatings, house arrest or imprisonment.

And if the 300,000 victims of the Nanjing Massacre are slighted in some Japanese textbooks, what of the 30 million Chinese who died in famines created by Mao Zedong's lunatic Great Leap Forward between 1958 and 1962? No mention in Chinese texts; didn't happen.

Roundup: Media's Take on the News: Fred Hiatt: China Is in No Position to Lecture Japan About Facing the Truth About History


You need anymore, you let me know, cause I still sure you won't dig to verify the "veracity" of these claims.






seekerof

[edit on 23-4-2005 by Seekerof]



posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 06:44 PM
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I just came across this and thought it might as well go in this thread.



Chinese President Hu Jintao has urged Japan to "seriously reflect" on its wartime history and back up government apologies with action.

The Chinese leader said both sides would lose if there was confrontation. In that spirit, the Chinese authorities have recently clamped down on street protests triggered by the row.


news.bbc.co.uk...

Looks like China wants to push the envelope a little too far. I think it would be in China's best interest if this was a simple PR move to appease its citizens, but this seems it may only kindle the fire in Chinese hearts, while at the same time China wants to supress activism.



posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 06:54 PM
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You need anymore, you let me know, cause I still sure you won't dig to verify the "veracity" of these claims.



I commend your efforts to back up the claims, but these are little more than op/eds, and one of them looks like it is very "favourable" to the Japanese.


Anyway, I am not going to debate much more on this, as I have made my point and had your providing more info to back these claims up (and it is also late here, and I have work to do
).

Again, I was not disputing the Chinese acts, just trying to get some sense of balance and truth, as we know how quickly these threads can turn into hate-filled, flame wars which do no one any good.




Looks like China wants to push the envelope a little too far. I think it would be in China's best interest if this was a simple PR move to appease its citizens, but this seems it may only kindle the fire in Chinese hearts, while at the same time China wants to supress activism.


Jamuhn, Chinese Nationalism is on the rise and the CCP is trying to keep a lid on it whilst also using it to it's own gain. A dangerous ploy that could have serious ramifications.

It is the CCP that holds China together as the huge nation it is.

Before WW2, what we now know as China was a patchwork of different kingdoms and states, with the Northern Areas being CCP, the East/Central being mainly Nationalist and the West and South being a collection of differing nation-states (I can't for the life of me remember/spell the names that they had, Sianking being one I think....don't quote me though)



posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 06:57 PM
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as posted by Stumason
I commend your efforts to back up the claims, but these are little more than op/eds, and one of them looks like it is very "favourable" to the Japanese.

And despite what a Chinese history teachers says....?

Yeah.....I thought that would be the response, Stumason.
Thank you for your contributions to this topic.







seekerof



posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 07:10 PM
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And despite what a Chinese history teachers says....?


Your Chinese History teacher made a couple of comments, in a paragraph on one of the sites. The rest of it was all conjecture and opinion.

I am sorry if my disputing this is riling you, but I think it is a ploy to deflect attention away from the Japanese, as they have had a grilling of late.

They also seem to find it so hard to own up to what they did. You don't see this same thing from the Germans do you?

Besides, I am sure I can remember many textbooks from when I was at school (only 7 years ago) that painted the British Empire as a glorious beacon of civilisation, and only briefly (if at all) touched on the darker side of colonialism.

So why single out China for attacks?

You could say the same thing about the UK, France (in fact, don't mention France, as I know where that will lead), even the US occupation of the Phillipines as hypocrasy when you compare how we react when someone else "misbehaves".

We are all guilty of the same things the world over, having a pop at China just because of your belief in the "Evil Communist Chinese" is hypocritical yourself isn't it?

Equating Communism with Evil is synonymous of typical American thinking, as they have little understanding of the actual theories behind it. For crying out loud, we get called commies in the EU just because we have National Healthcare and some social welfare!



posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 07:11 PM
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Originally posted by Jamuhn
Looks like China wants to push the envelope a little too far. I think it would be in China's best interest if this was a simple PR move to appease its citizens, but this seems it may only kindle the fire in Chinese hearts, while at the same time China wants to supress activism.

(Emphasis added)

Though that may be the perception China wishes to give, Jamuhn, I can't buy into that type thinking.
Two reasons:
1) Chinese people do not protest unless it is backed, sanctioned, and/or approved by the Chinese government.
2) If their intentions were to halt the 'demonstrations,' how is that this issue [Japanese revisionism, etc] is being used in the Chinese governments ongoing online campaign to have Japan discredited and not allowed admission onto/into a Security Council seat?
Chinese Nationalists Turn to Internet in Campaign to Block Japan From U.N. Security Council




seekerof

[edit on 23-4-2005 by Seekerof]



posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 07:25 PM
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as posted by Stumason
Your Chinese History teacher made a couple of comments, in a paragraph on one of the sites. The rest of it was all conjecture and opinion.


First off, she was interviewed in Shanghai, China.
Secondly, as with the Cold War and the suppression of information coming out of Russia and the Warsaw Pact nations, you have apparently missed just how rare it is that such information is given from information tight China....from all sources....a Chinese active History teacher.

Pretty sad that you simply dismiss such as "conjecture and opinion."
Whats it going to take for a pattern to be seen between these numbered sources, Stumason?
I have no genie to ask for a Chinese history textbook, nor can I crap out a Chinese history textbook for comparing and "show and tell."

History Textbooks in China
The Falsification of History in China
China's history books also leave out some key events

And this:


Political observers on the US National Public Radio have argued that the controversy is being allowed by the PRC government partly in order to further a multitude of political goals[2]. American news broadcasters CNN and Time Magazine have also pointed out that historical inaccuracies are not limited to Japanese textbooks, but that Chinese government-made textbooks are equally rife with omissions and non-neutral point of view [3]. Cases of questioned text include the Great Leap Forward which caused 30 million Chinese deaths ("the People suffered major losses"), China's 1979 invasion of Vietnam, and the Cultural Revolution ("Lots of appalling events happened"). Tibet is a subject given scant mention except by foreign press[4], and Xinjiang remains detached to the ongoing controversy.

Japanese history textbooks controversy
A Child Learns History in Hong Kong

And another Chinese History teacher.....
China's Textbooks Twist and Omit History

Truth lost in China history
Textbook Tensions: History 101: Rewrite the Past



China is trying [actually, they are not trying, they simple are] to play a political game of Moral High Ground with Japan, and the reasons are obvious [UN Security Council seat]. While the original article continues to be backed, amazing that some still continue to deny.....

Whats this sites motto again...I forgot...despite my opinion of China...




seekerof

[edit on 23-4-2005 by Seekerof]



posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 10:17 PM
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the japanese text books were only used in 2 schools in all of japan, and those were private schools. there are private schools like that in every country. imo the only mistake that japan made was approving the textbooks in the first place. but, if they didnt, they'd be accused of conservatives (a very very small minority in japan, like 1% of the population) of censorship



posted on Apr, 23 2005 @ 10:25 PM
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Japan long denied that it used chemical weapons during attacks on China in the 1930's. However, in 2002 the Japanese government conceded that it had used chemical agents on the Chinese---And sent toxic specialists to dig-up and remove buried poisons.

China, Russia, North Korea, South Korea, and many Asian countries do not trust the Japanese because of their actions in WWII. Chinese have every right to be angry.

The Japanese don't care about what China writes in their textbooks because China is a communist country and its a rule of thumb that their textbooks are going to lie. The Japanese should also be angry at China, but the Japanese live are asians with a western civilized society and they move on.



Also, Japan using its checkbook to apologize. So, that may be an alterior motive to the situation being provoked. Japan is the #1 foreign aid donor with aid usually totalling $9 billion.

[edit on 23-4-2005 by Enigmatic_Messiah]



posted on Apr, 28 2005 @ 01:21 AM
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Seekerof flame:

I must blame for your saying ,you barely understand what chinese feeling is ,that some 300,000 civilians were brutally killed by Janpanese invaders after fall of NanJing,the then-capaital of the Kuomintang government.
I am a Chinese ,i have right to reveal the truth of history.

A Chinese boy cries amid the ruins of a city bombed by the Japanese during the "War of Resistance against Japan"


A Japanese soldier looks at Chinese corpses piled up in a ditch in Nanking during the "Rape of Nanking" in December 1937. Nanking is the old spelling for Nanjing, in East China's Jiangsu Province.



Japanese Imperial Army soldiers about to behead a Chinese man in Nanjing. A Chinese court has begun hearings in a suit brought by an elderly woman enraged that a Japanese writer called her testimony of the infamous 1937 Nanjing Massacre a lie.

[edit on 28-4-2005 by bobic00]



posted on Apr, 28 2005 @ 01:31 AM
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Wheelchair bound Chinese plaintiff Jing Lanzhi,and fellow claimant Lu Qi, holding a portrait of her mother Li Xiuying, lead their supporters into Tokyo High Court yesterday. The banner they are holding demands Japan apologize and compensate victims of the 1937 Nanjing Massacre, where Japanese invading troops slaughtered up to 300,000 civilians after they took control of the then Chinese capital, as well as those affected by wartime germ experiments and the fire bombing of Yong'an in Fujian Province. The court rejected the compensation claims filed by the two and eight other survivors of the Japanese atrocities.

[edit on 28-4-2005 by bobic00]



posted on Apr, 28 2005 @ 01:41 AM
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A museum official in Nanjing Thursday shows diaries written by a military doctor and letters written by senior officials of the then-ruling Kuomintang on the Japanese atrocities. They were all sent to the museum by an anonymous donor on Wednesday.



posted on Apr, 28 2005 @ 01:46 AM
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What a sharp contrast between the way the German and Japanese authorities dealt with wartime atrocities committed by their forebears during World War II.

Basically, Germans faced up to the fact that what their forebears did was terribly wrong and appreciated the "forgive-but-not-forget" attitude of those who suffered at their hands.

The Japanese, however, do not seem to be able to do this. Instead, they keep asking their forgive-but-not-forget victims "if you would not put the past behind us, how can we move forward?" Thus conveniently forgetting the terrible wrongs of their forebears, the Japanese could repeat the same wrongs all over again.

As such, Japan cannot be trusted to become a permanent member of the UN Security Council, which it seeks to become in September. On the other hand, Germany deserves to be so trusted.

On April 10, German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder expressed deep regret over the atrocities committed by the Nazis during World War II at a ceremony marking the 60th anniversary of the liberation of the Bruckenwald concentration camp where about 60,000 prisoners, mostly Jews, perished.

On the same day, Japanese Foreign Minister Nobutaka Machimura demanded an apology from China for the damage done to its consular and business establishments during two days of anti-Japan demonstrations in Beijing, Guangzhou and Shenzhen. The demonstrators objected to the Japanese revising its school textbooks to whitewash atrocities committed by the Japanese Imperial Army in the 1930s and early 1940s in China.

The textbooks list as Japanese territory not only the four northern islands occupied by Russia after World War II, but also the Chinese and Korean islands in the East China Sea and off the Korean peninsula.

The textbooks even talk as though China was the aggressor that provoked the war. Actually, as early as the Meiji reform in 1864, the then Japanese prime minister already suggested to Emperor Meiji that the conquering of China was the prerequisite to becoming a world power like the Western nations.

In 1894 Japan launched and won a war with China to annex Taiwan, and in the following years till 1945, Japan engineered one clash after another against China leading to the occupation of most parts of the country. During the eight years of Japanese aggression against China from 1937 to 1945, more than 35 million Chinese civilians were killed by the Japanese. In the infamous Nanjing Massacre alone, Japanese soldiers killed more than 300,000 Chinese civilians and raped more than 20,000 women.

A tiny number of the demonstrators in Beijing, Guangzhou and Shenzhen may have behaved in an extreme way to vent their anger, but their wrath was understandable considering the historical context.

Little wonder that the world saw fit to pick such an old denominator as the 60th anniversary to commemorate the ceasing of hostilities in May (in Europe) and in August (in the Pacific), after commemorating the 50th anniversary. In this connection, the BBC will be broadcasting a documentary, showing the Rape of Nanking in 1937/38, against which the Japanese authorities raised strong objection but the BBC refused to budge. Neo-Nazi and militarist factions are rearing their ugly heads again in Germany and Japan. We in Asia do wonder why must Japan let that happen.

Japan tried to get even with the US by starting the Pacific War in 1941 with an attack on Pearl Harbour, to avenge the humiliation inflicted by the Americans by forcing open Japan's doors with the "black ships" in the mid-1850s. Japan failed miserably, with the dropping of the A-bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the US, leading to its surrender. But why does Japan now try to take it out on its Asian neighbours who suffered similar humiliation and have no designs on Japan, or for that matter, on anybody else?

China even forsook the war reparations owed by Japan, but now Japan is seeking compensation for a few windows smashed by an understandably angry crowd! Perhaps Japan has such a huge chip on its shoulder, knowing it has no hope of defeating the US, it wants to take an easy way out - trying her hands again on China. (Japan never accepted that China had a part in defeating it in World War II.)

One hopes the Japanese foreign minister will have the good sense to see the error of his ways and follow the example of Germany to pursue a conciliatory course when he visits China. Only when a country starts to respect history can it be considered a respectable member of the international community.



posted on Apr, 28 2005 @ 01:51 AM
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The nations of men are hypocrites, nothing new.




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