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Recent mice experiment...evidence of beneficial mutation?

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posted on Apr, 22 2005 @ 03:12 PM
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I had originally posed this question, in another thread (www.abovetopsecret.com...)unfortunately the thread fell off and never had an answer from some of the ATS members who are expert in areas of DNA and evolution via mutations................The submitted story stated:

Scientists have been able to force mice into a state of hibernation by having them breathe hydrogen sulfide. The gas is normally lethal in high doses, but at the right dosage it seems to force the mice into a very low metabolic state. Scientists are hoping further research will lead to the ability to force a similar type of human hibernation.


Could this mean that the ability of some species to hibernate, could possibly be a mutation?



Sulfur-reducing bacteria, which use sulfur as a food source, are the primary producers of large quantities of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). These bacteria chemically change natural sulfates (SO4) in water to hydrogen sulfide. Sulfur-reducing bacteria live in oxygen-deficient environments such as deep wells, plumbing systems, water softeners and water heaters. These bacteria strip the O2 molecule from the sulfate ion to leave (S) which combines with Hydrogen in water to form H2S. These bacteria usually flourish in large recirculating water tanks and ponds.


Could this same result found in the lab, have occured naturally in the past....and would this new trait/ability be passed on to the next generation? Could this show how environmental factors can effect beneficial mutations to the host organism...Seems, IMO, that certain species have benefitted greatly by their ability to hibernate.



[edit on 22-4-2005 by Rren]




posted on Apr, 22 2005 @ 04:37 PM
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Originally posted by Rren
Scientists have been able to force mice into a state of hibernation by having them breathe hydrogen sulfide. The gas is normally lethal in high doses, but at the right dosage it seems to force the mice into a very low metabolic state. Scientists are hoping further research will lead to the ability to force a similar type of human hibernation.



Could this mean that the ability of some species to hibernate, could possibly be a mutation?

I'm not really sure what this has to do with mutation. This says that the correct dose of H2S induces a hibernation like state. Your post makes no mention of genes, mutations, DNA, etc. Is something missing? Perhaps if you provided a link to the original source the confusion could be alleviated.
In any case, hibernation certainly results from a difference in genetic components of different organisms, it seems like the question you are asking is more akin to "Could a mutation induce hibernation like behavior in a non-hibernating species?" Maybe... I don't know.



Sulfur-reducing bacteria, which use sulfur as a food source, are the primary producers of large quantities of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). These bacteria chemically change natural sulfates (SO4) in water to hydrogen sulfide. Sulfur-reducing bacteria live in oxygen-deficient environments such as deep wells, plumbing systems, water softeners and water heaters. These bacteria strip the O2 molecule from the sulfate ion to leave (S) which combines with Hydrogen in water to form H2S. These bacteria usually flourish in large recirculating water tanks and ponds.



Could this same result found in the lab, have occured naturally in the past....and would this new trait/ability be passed on to the next generation? Could this show how environmental factors can effect beneficial mutations to the host organism...Seems, IMO, that certain species have benefitted greatly by their ability to hibernate.

Again, I think I am a little confused. Sulfur reducing bacteria weren't created in a lab. This is just a statement about the metabolism of these organisms. The process has occured naturally; humans didn't create sulfur-reducing bacteria, though they may create conditions wherein these traits are selected for, they are not creating the bacteria. But there are plenty of examples of organisms being perfectly adapted to occupy select niches unoccupied by other organisms. What do these sulfur bacteria have to do with hibernation though?



posted on Apr, 22 2005 @ 05:22 PM
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i'm a laymen, I wouldn't have a clue

[edit on 22-4-2005 by Rren]

I was showing, with the quote, that this occurs naturally and my question was: could that have led to an ability to hibernate that is passed on to the next generation.

[edit on 22-4-2005 by Rren]



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