The Case for Roswell: Part IV (Section B) Conclusion Thread

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posted on Mar, 13 2013 @ 11:23 AM
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reply to post by claymanthenimrod
 


Sorry for the bit of necromancing the thread here, but saw some questions I never answered...


1) My main "problem" with this event is the material. According to two of the witnesses of the crash the object seemed to be moving fairly slow. One guy (sorry for not using the names) say he estimated it was moving around 500-600 Mph and another widness said they saw it on the horizon for about 20 seconds and according to the map and where they were located this would sugest also that the object was not moving very fast. Now, at this speed with such amazingly strong material, how did the object get so badly damaged? Supposedly no one can cut, burn or break the stuff but witnesses describe a massive field of debris.


Witnesses of the crash? Keep in mind, there are a lot of witnesses involved in this story, and many witnesses have been discounted over the years, especially relating to any who stated they saw the crash. Remember, the debris on the ranch wasn't discovered until later.


2) I wonder why no one took any pictures of these events. Of the debris or of the military blockade. i know the military took all the debris from the witnesses but why didnt any of them take a picture of the stuff. (i am fairly young so i dont know how redily available cameras were in 1947)


Today, everyone has a camera right on their phone. In 1947, unless they were expecting to take pictures for an event, I can't imagine most would have a camera anywhere near them. Also, I can surely imagine the military would have confiscated any cameras they saw. I seem to recall one witness mentioning taking photos of debris (at the house), but they were seized along with the debris. I'll have to dig for that.


3) What are these people trying to burn the debris with? There is alot of material out there made to resist extremly high temperatures. If they were just using matches or even a acetylene torch as mentioned there are materials out there that can resist that kind of heat. I work with cars alot and cutting thin sheet metal with a acetylene torch painfully slow. I am sorry I am not providing examples of materials that resist heat well just because I do not have the time to do the research. If there are any interesting replys to my post I can hopefully do some research this weekend.


Well, I know it's been a while. I imagined it ranged from a lighter to torches. There are specific military witnesses that mention torches, and I can imagine that the responders to the first debris field (believing it to be a downed aircraft) would have brought them. Of course, we simply don't know any other tests conducted when the debris was flown to Ft. Worth and Wright Field.






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