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Hybrid Atoms

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posted on Apr, 17 2005 @ 05:53 PM
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Would it be possible, in theory, to alter atoms, inside the nucleus etc, with other atoms to create hybrid atoms?

Would you be able to make like calcium iron ?








posted on Apr, 17 2005 @ 06:16 PM
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No.

If you squash two lighter/smaller atoms (like, say, hydrogenb) together, you could add to tne number of particles in the nucleus (and give off a lot of heat in the process). This new atom could be, say, Helium. This process is called "fusion".

Contrariwise, you could take a big/heavy atom (like, say, uranium or plutonium) and add one more neutron, it becomes unstable and breaks into smaller pieces which are new elements (and gives off a lot of heat in the process). This process is called "fission".

But neither process will create a "hybrid" atom, the new atpms are different elements or isotopes of the same.



posted on Apr, 17 2005 @ 06:32 PM
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Are you guys talking about SuperAtoms? I just ran across an interesting story on Newscientist the other day, that pretty much stated that our periodic table is woefully inadequete and need a dramatic overhaul, here is the link.

A New Kind of Alchemy



posted on Apr, 17 2005 @ 08:06 PM
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Originally posted by Dulcimer
Would it be possible, in theory, to alter atoms, inside the nucleus etc, with other atoms to create hybrid atoms?

Would you be able to make like calcium iron ?






Nope.

One particular kind of atom can have different numbers of neutrons. This results in different isotopes of one particular atom. For example, 'regular' carbon is C-12, because its atomic weight is 12, it has 6 protons and 6 neutrons. If instead there are two extra neutrons added to C-12, you get C-14, which is radioactive, and is the carbon that is used in Carbon Dating, basically they look at how much C-14 there is in something, since it decays radioactively (if thats a word) if there is less C-14 in something, its older. (I'm not sure if scientists can currently add/remove neutrons, though; I think so, with difficulty, but don't take that as gospel)

You can add/remove electrons to atoms. This results in ions. This is done all the time in everyday life. For example, if an electron is removed from a sodium atom and given to a chloride atom, you get NaCl, or table salt.

Adding/removing protons is basically what Off_The_Street is talking about above, with fusion and fission. This actually changes the atom, i.e. from hydrogen to helium, or from plutonium to uranium.

Sorry, no calcium iron for you



posted on Apr, 17 2005 @ 09:03 PM
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no.

im talking about deep down inside the atoms, the quarks and beyond.

im wondering what the difference between them inside these zones.



posted on Apr, 17 2005 @ 09:19 PM
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Dulcimer

If you change the quarks, and 'fundamental' components, then you wouldn't have 'hybrid atoms', you'd have a new sort of quark, and it wouldn't necessarily have any properties that are anything like any atom.

Atoms are composed of neutrons, electrons, and protons. The characteristics of atoms are determined largely by their electrons (the outermost electrons, in the 'valence shell' are the ones that give things chemical properties, and thus make carbon act like carbon and sulfur like sulfur) and protons. All protons in all atoms are the same, as with electrons and neutrons. So changing the numbers of protons et al literally gives a different (already known) atom, not a hybrid.
Altering the stuff that makes up protons would, I'd think, give you something other than protons, and thus something different from atoms.



posted on Apr, 17 2005 @ 09:22 PM
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Yes you can make a calcium ion.

Just ionize a calcium atom.


Anyway, what they all said. ^ You'd just alter the atom to not be an atom, or to be a different element.



posted on Apr, 19 2005 @ 02:24 AM
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I noticed this news story today,it fits with my initial statement about the parts inside (quarks etc)

Using a giant atom smasher, scientists on Monday said that they have created a new state of matter — a hot, dense liquid made out of basic atomic particles — that shows what the early universe looked like for a very, very brief time.

"We have a new state of matter. We think we are looking at a phenomenon ... in the universe 13 billion years ago when free quarks and gluons ... cooled down to the particles that we know today," said Sam Aronson, associate laboratory director.
The researchers smashed two gold ions together at extremely high speeds, and the collision was so intense that the strong force that usually binds quarks into protons and neutrons weakened allowing the quarks to roam freely.

www.msnbc.msn.com...



posted on Apr, 21 2005 @ 03:02 PM
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That was a pretty cool link, dulcimer. I found it quite interesting, how the protons & neutrons actually broke up into quarks, and then acted like a liquid. If I get a chance, I'm going to send that link to a friend of mine, he does plasma research, maybe he has some insight into this. He is genius on everything plasma (and physics in general, hehe).

I couldn't help wondering though, about one thing. Keep in mind this is pure speculation. The scientists reported that the quarks behaved like a *liquid* at that huge temperature of 10000x the sun's temp. Now, at temperatures colder than that, quarks are inside the protons and neutrons like usual, like a *solid.* (see where I'm going with this, maybe?) What I wonder is whether if we could manage to heat the quarks even more, like a million times as hot as the sun, would they start behaving like a *gas*? Just something to think about, to tie your brain into knots



posted on Apr, 21 2005 @ 03:07 PM
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Originally posted by Dulcimer
I noticed this news story today,it fits with my initial statement about the parts inside (quarks etc)

Using a giant atom smasher, scientists on Monday said that they have created a new state of matter — a hot, dense liquid made out of basic atomic particles — that shows what the early universe looked like for a very, very brief time.

"We have a new state of matter. We think we are looking at a phenomenon ... in the universe 13 billion years ago when free quarks and gluons ... cooled down to the particles that we know today," said Sam Aronson, associate laboratory director.
The researchers smashed two gold ions together at extremely high speeds, and the collision was so intense that the strong force that usually binds quarks into protons and neutrons weakened allowing the quarks to roam freely.

www.msnbc.msn.com...


Yes, that's what I do for living
Seriously, I work in Dr. Aronson's organization.

Now, there can be forms of exotic nuclei, which might contain strange quarks. This would be a highly unusual form of matter, as such nuclei could be large and heavy, and might even be stable. This has not been confirmed experimentally, though.



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