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Black hole bomb

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posted on Apr, 11 2005 @ 11:09 PM
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I was thinking, is there any bomb that has so much magnets in it that can interfere with the earth gravity, and causes the formation of a black hole. This black hole can swallow all the things in the region that the bomb hit.


hmm i did some google search on gravity bomb

gravity bomb - a bomb that falls because of gravity and is not guided to a target
Antonyms: smart bomb - a bomb that can be guided (by a laser beam or radio) to its target; "smart bombs have revolutionized aerial bombardment"

From : dictionary.laborlawtalk.com...


And then i search on Black hole bomb
arxiv.org... ( anyone understands this whole article, too profound for me)

Is there a possibility that such a black hole bomb can be produced?




posted on Apr, 11 2005 @ 11:25 PM
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It is becoming much more accepted to refer to a black hole as more of a "black star"

Why? Because we know that gravity exists, and some type of anti-force to gravity MIGHT exist. It is believed that a dark star could be sustained within the event horizon, but we can't see past the event horizon to know for sure.

What we do know is that black holes grow larger, but why would a negative space grow larger by adding more stuff? It doesn't quite make sense to say you get more of a negative thing by adding more positive stuff.

Thus, a black hole bomb is not very likely because a black hole is possibly more of a "black star." Thus, a black hole bomb would cause a supernova of unknown proportions, assuming there is a complete gravitational reversal (or at least a significant gravitational reversal).

We don't know enough about gravity to go much further in this discussion. Within the next couple years we should have a much better grasp of "what" gravity really is (upwards of maybe 15 years). Thus, you and I get to enjoy the waiting game.

www.nature.com...

[edit on 11-4-2005 by Protector]



posted on Apr, 11 2005 @ 11:48 PM
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One qeustion, why would anyone want to make such a device, I mean you cant make it only effect a designated area only, it would suck up the Solar system, depending on its size and over all gravitational force.



posted on Apr, 12 2005 @ 12:02 AM
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Military theorists have started to speculate about the possibility of using small black holes as weapons cutting off their supply of fresh material electrically.

Thats the real danger if you created a Singularity once something like that is created they just dont stop feeding and growing. Left unchecked a black hole would swallow the whole planet and even our whole sun if it got the chance.

www.globalideasbank.org...

Scary stuff the power to kill whole solar systems


[edit on 12-4-2005 by ShadowXIX]



posted on Apr, 12 2005 @ 10:05 AM
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I think you're getting a few things confused.


Originally posted by hrtw
I was thinking, is there any bomb that has so much magnets in it that can interfere with the earth gravity, and causes the formation of a black hole.

No. A black hole is formed when you take a star that's bigger than our sun and squish the whole thing down to the size of a baseball or so. It's not formed by magnetism.

So you'd have to go find a star and then cause it to collapse instantly.



gravity bomb - a bomb that falls because of gravity and is not guided to a target

You're misreading this. An example of a "gravity bomb" would be a "water balloon"... you know; you drop something on something else and it goes splat or boom. A hand grenade is not a gravity bomb because you have to do something to it to set it off. Pure nitroglycerine is a gravity bomb; when you drop it, it explodes.

That's what they mean.

Is there a possibility that such a black hole bomb can be produced?

Not in our universe.



posted on Apr, 12 2005 @ 10:46 AM
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Sure?



I think I read the title wrong.


Seriously though, the article that hrtw linked to put forward that a Kerr black hole could be interrupted by directing light away from the event horizon with a mirror inserted at an angle. A Kerr black hole is thought to be the most common type of black hole in the universe. Some astrophysicists believe that some black holes could be tiny things left over from the big bang (smaller than neutrons, not even big enough to eat an atom), and we could be able to find them out in the asteroid belt by "bumping" the asteroids and capturing them when they are turned out. The tiny black hole theory has been proposed for where all the dark matter in the universe could be.

I suppose that it could be possible to disrupt a black holes event horizon and cause a very large release of energy. I don't understand the entire theoretical math involved in the article so I can't really give an educated decision on whether it holds true. However, theoretically the black hole would have to be small enough not to rip the mirror device to shreds before it got to the event horizon. Also, the black hole would also have to have an event horizon that didn't warp or lens light away from it.


[edit on 12-4-2005 by Seth76]




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