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Read the Loony—Moon Hoax Novel?

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posted on Apr, 6 2005 @ 06:56 PM
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I’ve been waiting a long time for someone to write a novel about the moon hoax conspiracy, and now, somebody has. Christopher Wunderlee’s “The Loony” is about an astrophysicist named Albert Lochner who is recruited by the military after college and put to work faking the Apollo Space Program. After it’s a success, Albert is blackmailed in to accompanying two FBI agents (called G-men) on a journey across America, only then he escapes. He was blackmailed by the government because they kidnap his girlfriend and he has to agree to something in order for her not to get killed. Only then it turns out she’s not a victim, but played him.
That’s the basic plot. However, this doesn’t reflect on how the book is written, which is in this neat, smart way. I had fun reading it. There’s a bunch of hilarious episodes, and the author writes in a very clear, understandable, quirky way.
The parts about how they faked the moon missions are really well done, and the book has some ideas I don’t think anyone else has proposed.




posted on Apr, 7 2005 @ 01:33 AM
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Sounds like an interesting book. For more information on it, here's what amazon.com had to say: The Loony: A Novella of Epic Proportions.

Out of curiousity, what other sort of theories of how the landing was faked were stated?



posted on Apr, 7 2005 @ 03:59 PM
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I’m no expert. I’ve seen a few documentaries and read one or two books, but from what I can tell, they all generally say the same things (photographs, radiation, etc.). But, in this book, there are some ideas that I know are new. I found a website for the book, and even there, there are pictures of the construction of a fake moon I’ve never seen before. Some of the other stuff is obviously fabricated for the book, but the way the hoax is explained is very new. For instance, a lot of debunkers point out that the USSR confirmed the Apollo missions happened – why would they do that if it was a hoax? One of my favorite parts of “The Loony” is this intricate, strange explanation of how history works and how governments propagandize it. There is a great explanation why the Russians would agree to this strange historical bartering system in which history is rewritten and events are fabricated for the benefit of a particular country. They all lie, they all construct their own myths, and they trade favors to support each others’ claims. According to the book, this has been going on for centuries, but really grew into its modern form during the Enlightenment – when several thinkers tricked the world into thinking people thought the world was flat until Columbus came along. Thus, mythologizing his role in history and altering the past for the benefit of a select few. The moon missions were the same thing, according to the author. (The book actually talks a lot about all kinds of conspiracies in a very neat way.)
Besides that, there’s lots of neat stuff about where they made the stuff. According to the book, the images of the moon where shot in Siberia somewhere (I can’t remember the exact name of the place), and a lot of the other stuff was actually shot in Rainier Park in Washington State. It’s well known that this was the first place in the US where a UFO sighting was made, an interesting tidbit. Then, there’s stuff about geomorphology and astrophysics that were way over my head. A lot of them were really complex, in some ways, but still made sense to even me, a non-scientist. I just don’t think I could retell it at all and have it do justice. There’s biographical information about people involved that’s really interesting, and some interesting things about how the space program even got its start.
Anyway, this is probably too long. For the most part, the author is just so good at telling the story. I think its amazing that he’s introduced some new ideas, but for the most part, I’m glad I read it because it was so much fun. I hate dry books.

Loony website



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