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SCI/TECH: DNA Analysis to Become Household Item

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posted on Apr, 5 2005 @ 03:58 PM
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A Barcelona university has developed a miniature sensor for analysing DNA which reduces the time required to identify DNA to as little as a few minutes. The chip's applications include identification of individuals, paternity tests, and identifying bacterial strains in food-borne illnesses. Mass production will make the chip as cheap and as widely available as a home pregnancy test.
 



www.spacedaily.com
The sensors have the same size and thickness as a fingernail and reduce the time needed to identify DNA chains to several minutes or a few hours, depending on each chain.

Once mass production of the sensors begins, their cost and availability will be similar to that of pregnancy test kits found in pharmacies.

Other important applications for DNA sensors include: detecting genetically modified organisms in food, either in basic ingredients or in prepared food; identifying people, either to establish blood relations or to find criminal evidence; and testing the toxicity of different drugs to establish what damage they may cause to the DNA molecule of disease-causing microorganisms and of cells in patients.

The new miniaturised electrochemical genosensors meet the current need for DNA to be analysed at a low cost with easy-to-use devices that do not need to be supervised by highly trained scientists.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.




Personal access to DNA identification technology, previously the stuff of science-fiction, may soon become a common reality. Uses could range from such serious applications as determination of parentage, to finding out who it really was that stole the last cookie from the cookie jar...

Related News Links:
www.physorg.com
www.uab .es

[edit on 2005/4/5 by wecomeinpeace]




posted on Apr, 6 2005 @ 02:19 PM
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Mom:Who stole the cookies from the cookie jar?
Mom:Was it you Jimmy?

Jimmy: no Mon it was Sue.

Mom: Don't lie Jimmy. The DNA analysis proves it was you.


Does this inovation have any real good uses? It almost seems like a waste to me.



posted on Apr, 6 2005 @ 02:32 PM
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Does this inovation have any real good uses? It almost seems like a waste to me.


Well if it does what is says it will and passes the muster test for DNA testing, it could save millions if not billions of dollars in paternity tests alone.



posted on Apr, 6 2005 @ 02:58 PM
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Further fine-tuning of this technology could perhaps also be used as another "big brother" security identification method at airports and secure facilities. Imagine at customs, you drop a gum swab into a slot and it brings up your details, classified and sorted by DNA.



posted on Apr, 6 2005 @ 03:24 PM
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The last time I ordered a paternity test for a suspected father of a client, the going price was $450 and took a week or more because the specimen had to be sent to a lab in another state.

What does a home pregnancy test cost?



posted on Apr, 6 2005 @ 03:31 PM
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the most exspensive one I've seen is about 15 bucks......but I've seen a few for around $5.



posted on Apr, 6 2005 @ 05:33 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott
The last time I ordered a paternity test for a suspected father of a client, the going price was $450 and took a week or more because the specimen had to be sent to a lab in another state.

What does a home pregnancy test cost?


Only 450 but that was for the test alone right? Include lawyer fees, court fees, lost time from work etc., then you have what I was pointing out; it could save millions for sure world wide perhaps billions.

Just curious why did you ask the cost of a home pregnancy test, Since that does not determine who the father was?

[edit on 4/6/2005 by shots]



posted on Apr, 6 2005 @ 07:27 PM
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Originally posted by wecomeinpeace

news -

Other important applications for DNA sensors include: ....... testing the toxicity of different drugs to establish what damage they may cause to the DNA molecule of disease-causing microorganisms and of cells in patients.





This is ASTOUNDING. ...We are talking personalized medicine here - and an end to using patients as guinea pigs!


...Most every drug is targeted to a specific protein - and so affects individual patients differently depending on their genetic makeup. It always has been possible to test for the target protein and identify who is susceptible to what side-effects - but never done (too expensive, not covered). So patients are guinea pigs, made to "try" drugs to see what will work.


...With this - no more. Excellent. And about time.






detecting genetically modified organisms in food, either in basic ingredients or in prepared food;




:up I'd like to know...



posted on Apr, 6 2005 @ 08:32 PM
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Originally posted by shots
Only [$]450 but that was for the test alone right? Include lawyer fees, court fees, lost time from work etc., then you have what I was pointing out; it could save millions for sure world wide perhaps billions.


Four hundred and fifty dollars was to pay an agency to contact an individual and take a sample to send to a lab for testing, taking the responsibility to maintain the proper protocols, such as chain of custody, so that the results would be admissible and "air-tight" in court.



Just curious why did you ask the cost of a home pregnancy test, Since that does not determine who the father was?




Once mass production of the sensors begins, their cost and availability will be similar to that of pregnancy test kits found in pharmacies.

www.spacedaily.com...



posted on Apr, 6 2005 @ 08:43 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott

Just curious why did you ask the cost of a home pregnancy test, Since that does not determine who the father was?




Once mass production of the sensors begins, their cost and availability will be similar to that of pregnancy test kits found in pharmacies.

www.spacedaily.com...


I am still at a loss Grady, just what are you trying to get at? I just need more clarification or have I missed something?



posted on Apr, 6 2005 @ 09:01 PM
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My point, which seems crystal clear to me, is that the difference between a DNA test now and a DNA test, when mass production drops the price to that of a drug store pregnancy test, will be at least $430, according to the data supplied jlc163. A significant saving.

Even when one has to follow the rules of evidence, a test that can be administered and read by a single certified technician and a lab certification, the price would drop to about the price of a urine test for substances, which is roughly $50, a saving of $400.

Heck, with this technology, the judge could administer the test right in the courtroom, eliminating the need for a chain of custody protocol.

Is that simple enough?

Edited for extra clarity.


[edit on 05/4/6 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Apr, 6 2005 @ 09:06 PM
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The Mark Of The Beast, Take 3?

Considering all the hullabaloo over RFID chips (you know, the chips the New World Order is going to force us to accept Real Soon Now), I'm surprised that this and biometrics don't stir up more paranoia.

After all, RFID chips can be removed and transplanted, but good luck changing your DNA.

And of course, the idea of actually maintaining control of a government instead of becoming hysterical about the inevitability of new technology is simply a nonstarter for some.

Oh well, just thought I'd put in a plug on behalf of the RFID-chips-are-evil contingent, who seem strangely silent in the face of alternatives like this, which do not require implantation at all.

I guess “forced implantation” is more “sexy” for conspiracy buffs than fingerprint or DNA matching.



posted on Apr, 7 2005 @ 07:25 AM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott
My point, which seems crystal clear to me, is that the difference between a DNA test now and a DNA test, when mass production drops the price to that of a drug store pregnancy test, will be at least $430, according to the data supplied jlc163. A significant saving.


Heck, with this technology, the judge could administer the test right in the courtroom, eliminating the need for a chain of custody protocol.

Is that simple enough?

Edited for extra clarity.


[edit on 05/4/6 by GradyPhilpott]


Would it surprise you if I said no


The DNA test determines who the parent/parents is/are, Right


Home pregnancy tests only tells you that you are pregnant, right


As you can see they are not identical tests and have no connection, or are you saying a home pregnancy test can tell one who the father is?

If that is the case and the father can be determined by a home pregnancy test, then it makes sense.





[edit on 4/7/2005 by shots]



posted on Apr, 7 2005 @ 08:17 AM
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Shots I belive that Grady is just pointing to the difference in cost and the fact that when the DNA tests are available to the general public much like pregnancy tests the cost will be much lower than the $450 they are paying now. Not that there is any similarity to the actual tests.

Hope that helps



posted on Apr, 7 2005 @ 08:45 AM
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Shots: So who's on first?

Grady: No, Watt's on first. Hu's on second.

Shots: I don't know who's on second.

etc etc etc



posted on Apr, 7 2005 @ 09:25 AM
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Originally posted by justme1640
Shots I belive that Grady is just pointing to the difference in cost and the fact that when the DNA tests are available to the general public much like pregnancy tests the cost will be much lower than the $450 they are paying now. Not that there is any similarity to the actual tests.

Hope that helps


Perhaps, but seeing as Grady appears to be a lawyer he might be worried about the clients he might loose. That is why I asked for clarification.



posted on Apr, 7 2005 @ 09:30 AM
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Originally posted by wecomeinpeace
Shots: So who's on first?

Grady: No, Watt's on first. Hu's on second.

Shots: I don't know who's on second.

etc etc etc


No way. Since when is it wrong to ask for clarification? Better to ask first then shoot yourself in the foot wouldn't you say?



posted on Apr, 7 2005 @ 11:10 AM
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Originally posted by shots
No way. Since when is it wrong to ask for clarification? Better to ask first then shoot yourself in the foot wouldn't you say?


Easy there, Shots. It's perfectly fine to ask for clarification. Both you and Grady were misunderstanding each other's meaning. I made a joke; a poor one obviously. Who's on First? by Abbott & Costello



posted on Apr, 7 2005 @ 12:50 PM
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I am not a lawyer. I am a Social Worker who used to work in Child Protection Services. The court would order that at test would be done to determine paternity, it was up to me to contract for those services.

As someone pointed out, the article said that a DNA test kit will soon be as cheap, as available, and as easy to use as a home pregnancy test. If that is true, it will cut out a lot of middle people and thus reduce the over all cost of testing, as I said, to about the price of a urine screening test and, in fact, could be done in the courtroom, as there would be no waiting period so the specimen can be sent to an out-of-state lab.

I really don't know how my original post could have been so misconstrued as to create a mini-firestorm, unless someone failed to read the article in the first place.

[edit on 05/4/7 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Apr, 7 2005 @ 05:40 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott


I really don't know how my original post could have been so misconstrued as to create a mini-firestorm, unless someone failed to read the article in the first place.

[edit on 05/4/7 by GradyPhilpott]


Honest I never meant it to look the way it turned out. I thought it would be better to ask for clarification rather then assuming and in esscence stick my foot in my mouth. I am sure you can agree with that.

No offense meant and not offence taken



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