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Is Earth's velocity/acceleration constant?

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posted on Mar, 23 2005 @ 08:50 AM
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This is a question for all you astro-physicists and space-time ponderers out there.

Is the velocity/acceleration of the earth through space constant as it approaches and proceeds from the apogee and perigee of its orbit around the sun?

My personal feeling is, it isn't because our orbit around the sun is an ellipse. I support this with the old 'tennis ball on a string' theory. Tie a ball to a string and swing it around your head in an elliptical pattern. The ball seems to accelerate as it goes in and out of the apogee/perigee of its orbit around you on the string.

I also get a strange sensation as the winter and summer solstices approach and receed. Before the solstice, I get this feeling of increased load on space time, like a big car going into a tight corner. As the solstice passes, I get the impression that the load comes off with a bit of a slingshot effect. I feel the same way around the equinoxes, but the effect is not as pronounced.

Am I just fabricating this in a cart before the horse kind of way, or does what I'm talking about have any basis in scientific fact?



[edit on 23-3-2005 by Icarus Rising]




posted on Mar, 23 2005 @ 09:30 AM
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Originally posted by Icarus Rising
My personal feeling is, it isn't because our orbit around the sun is an ellipse. I support this with the old 'tennis ball on a string' theory. Tie a ball to a string and swing it around your head in an elliptical pattern. The ball seems to accelerate as it goes in and out of the apogee/perigee of its orbit around you on the string.


You would be correct then.


As for the sensation thing, I have no idea.



posted on Mar, 23 2005 @ 03:22 PM
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Well, to answer your question more directly, you can pretty much ignore the elliptical nature of the orbit. For all intents and purposes, and acceleration is pretty much the same. It will change a bit when we are farther or closer, but not much to talk about.

The velocity is always changing. Always. Velocity is a directed movement, a vector. The acceleration of Earth is inward, toward the Sun, so while we aren't getting any faster, we are changing direction. Thus, the velocity is always changing.

In the perfectly circular model, the speed would be constant because it has only magnitude. But, as you stated, in reality it would be changing as well as the acceleration.


Effects of other solar bodies really don't matter.



posted on Mar, 23 2005 @ 06:54 PM
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Amorymeltzer - Thank you for the clarification of the concept. I'm talking about speed along the path of orbit. As you said, the velocity vector is constantly changing. You agreed that the speed along the path of orbit and the acceleration in towards the sun are variable based on the position of the earth in its orbit. Is there a measureable difference? Am I deluding myself into thinking I can sense or feel the earth 'loading up' on its approach to and 'slingshotting' into its procession from the apogee and perigee of its orbit (and less so on the equinoxes)?



posted on Mar, 23 2005 @ 07:03 PM
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There is, of course, a measurable difference. The difference is really small, and by measurable I mean with very very sensitive instruments. You cannot feel anything. Odds are you heard something about this, and through a placebo-effectish thing, started to 'feel' things change. Either that, or you're attune to the seasons, which is very normal. A lot of people's emotions and feelings are strongly tied to the seasons.



posted on Mar, 23 2005 @ 07:57 PM
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The following comes from one of my schoolbooks, "Fundamentals of Physics" 6th Ed by Halliday/Resnick/Walker.
Kepler's 2nd law:

2. THE LAW OF AREAS: A line that connects a planet to the Sun sweeps out equal areas in the plane of the planet's orbit in equal times; that is, the rate dA/dt at which is sweept out area A is constant.

If that went over your head, the next sentence should clear it up.

Qualitatively, this second law tells us that thee planet will move most slowly when it is farthest from the Sun and most rapidly when it is nearest to the Sun.

Right there that means that Earth's velocity is not constant. Since the earth is speeding up and slowing down, it must be accelerating. The fact that it speeds up, slows down, speeds up, slows down, over and over, means that the acceleration is also not constant. The acceleration of the Earth due to the gravity of the Sun is dependent upon the distance between them, so as the distance changes, the acceleration changes.

(I love it when my schooling actually helps me do something in real life :lol



posted on Mar, 23 2005 @ 08:18 PM
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.
As already stated Earth's orbit is an almost circular ellipse. Kepler worked out the speed up and slow down of ellipses about a gravitational center.

But if you think about the the Sun travelling around the galactic center it is actually a spiral.

The galaxy is probably traveling as well. Spirals within spirals.

My worry is the Moon is measurably slipping away from the Earth. One inch per year. May not sound like much but the Earth and Moon's orbit around the Sun works to some degree as a binary planet system.

The further apart we get I think we act as a lower density planet and will start slipping out from the Sun. If we lose the Moon altogether it will happen much faster. We will circle farther and farther from the Sun, eventually flying out into the absolute zero cold of deep space.

We got a lucky roll of the galactic dice to end up here. We may need to do some upkeep for things to operate consistently.

Sometimes i imagine i can feel the 67,000 mph we are going around the Sun. Fasten those seatbelts, and keep in an upright and locked position.

don't know if you are feeling something tangible or not. Maybe you are sensing the grain of the Universal fabric.
.



posted on Mar, 23 2005 @ 08:18 PM
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Originally posted by DragonsDemesne
The following comes from one of my schoolbooks, "Fundamentals of Physics" 6th Ed by Halliday/Resnick/Walker./quote]

Haha OWNED! I've got 7th Ed.
It's a great book.



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 07:30 AM
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It looks like the science behind the fluctuations in orbital speed/acceleration is pretty definitive - and not over my head (I'm 6'5")


Now, the sensation of time compression and expansion I feel is not a form of SAD, although I am sensitive to seasonal climate and changes in the relative hours of day/night. What I'm talking about is the feeling I get when the clock says a certain amount of time has passed, but it feels to me the time elapsed has been longer than the clock dictates (going into the solstice) or shorter (slingshot effect coming out). I actually get an impression of things slowing down going in, and speeding up coming out. This is all relative to the clock, which I'm assuming is unaffected by these speed/acceleration changes and a second is still a second to the clock no matter what. This sensation is definitely linked to the solstices and to a lesser degree the equinoxes, and I've been around long enough (I'm 40) to pin it down.

Do I have too much time on my hands, or what?



[edit on 24-3-2005 by Icarus Rising]



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 05:38 PM
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I dont know anything about this subject, but i heard the Dec. 26th tsunami had an effect on the earths rotation, or it made it wobble or something like that. It was a minor wobble, but it just shows how powerful that son of a gun was. Also, about the tsunami (sorry, didnt mean to go off topic) i heard they picked up the readings in NYC, completely across the world from Asia.



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 06:43 PM
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Originally posted by Icarus Rising[/i
What I'm talking about is the feeling I get when the clock says a certain amount of time has passed, but it feels to me the time elapsed has been longer than the clock dictates (going into the solstice) or shorter (slingshot effect coming out).


Well, any changes you are experiencing the clock would too. It's exposed to the same forces you are. However, what YOU are experiencing is a function of the seasons, I still say. You may like one more than the other, work more during one, have more light during one, all of these would seriously affect your perceptions. Summer days always seem so long, yet so short...

Sorry, but you're not feeling the Earth's acceleration.

And, Schmidt, not the tsunami. It was the earthquake. The tsunami was a nicely sized tsunami, but the quake was a big mother-trucker. That sent the earth wobbling a bit, something like a few milimeters, which is INSANE to think about. Luckily not too long. Also, we should be able to detect it here, shockwaves and whatnot. Especially big ones. Earthquakes out west have made bells ring in pennsylvania and the mississippi flow backwards.



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 08:14 PM
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NO the rotation of the earth isn't constant, there are several factors involved here, but chief amungst them is the gravitational influence of our moon which actually acts to slow the earth down. I forget the exact numbers but over the past several million years, the moon has increased the lentgh of our days signifigantly and is slowing us down now. That's the theory anyway.



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 08:30 PM
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It would have to be because our summers and winters are all the same amount of time (4 months aprox). So if the world is going in an eliptical orbit, and all the seasons are the sme time, it' velocity would increase to pass the the larger displacement needed in summer.... my view on it . im not sure though



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 10:49 PM
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I'm convinced I feel space/time compression/extension around the solstices and to a lesser degree around the equinoxes. Who's to say that I'm not with such authority? If I'm wrong, so be it. That's ok with me, and I'm not sorry that you disagree, Amorymeltzer. I kind of sense that you wish you could feel it, too. Try discerning with your heart and soul, as well as your mind.




[edit on 24-3-2005 by Icarus Rising]



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 11:12 PM
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Well, I can't argue with you if you truly feel it, by I personally find it hard to believe one could be so in tune to the minute movements of the earth. Maybe I'll calculate the forces involved later, but all I can say is "good on you."

Good on you



(P.S. - Last I heard, I had no soul and no heart. My girlfriend tells me that a lot.)



posted on Mar, 24 2005 @ 11:41 PM
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I find it hard to believe that I can feel it, too. Thanks for the benefit of the doubt. I'm sure we are talking about extremely small fluctuations in speed and acceleration here. I have become very sensitive to my environment in the last several years, and I try to take it all with a grain of salt, so to speak. I can't be 100% sure that I am right, I'm just here trying to find a method to my madness. I appreciate the opportunity to discuss it.

In my experience, showing alot of heart and soul to girlfriends makes them think that they can walk all over you. Keep on building trust.





posted on Mar, 25 2005 @ 08:19 AM
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Originally posted by Icarus Rising
In my experience, showing alot of heart and soul to girlfriends makes them think that they can walk all over you. Keep on building trust.


I am SO quoting you on that! THANKS!



posted on Nov, 12 2008 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by Amorymeltzer
 

hey i dont think its philosophically sound to tell someone what they are or arent feeling. You are not in their body. You cannot say. Peas. x



posted on Nov, 12 2008 @ 10:31 AM
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An object in orbit is in freefall. It doesn't matter if the orbit is circular or highly elliptical. The only acceleration felt on an object in orbit is the acceleration due to its own gravity.



posted on Nov, 13 2008 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by Icarus Rising
 


As the Earth is in an orbit, its velocity can not be constant. And even if all orbits were perfectly round, because our Sun is itself orbiting the centre of the Milky Way, our acceleration couldn't be constant.

But as for you feeling it, I'd be seriously doubtful, as the differences are drowned out by us being so close to the Earth. The Earth's gravitational pull on us is far greater than the Sun's.

If it wasn't, we'd all be shooting off towards the Sun




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