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*Experiences of a Soldier*

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posted on Mar, 25 2005 @ 12:47 PM
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Originally posted by Mr Carburetor
Whether you are American, Australian, British, or Japanese or many of the other allies,....These are your own people out there with their lives at stake. To not support them is like stripping them of their will to succeed and make it back home alive.

Carburetor


I agree totally. I would also add that not protesting and doing all in your power to resist and make accountable the irresponsible government policies that landed these fine men and women in this mess in the first place it to turn your back on them, betray them and leave them to their fate also. At least demand a rapid resolution that they can be home soon and safe.




posted on Mar, 25 2005 @ 12:51 PM
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No amount of Rallying the Governments with protests will solve anythng. Demanding our troops back home is something that will fall on deaf ears.

Maybe if the ''leaders'' had relatives on the FRONT LINE, then maybe they would think again as to what actions they should take.

Anyways, this is getting off the topic a wee bit, so lets get back to topic in hand and see some more stories from service men and relatives.



posted on Mar, 25 2005 @ 02:26 PM
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Yeah, its been a little while since we heard some good experiences of a soldier. All of you sitting at those desks!! I know alot of you either know someone, have a relative, or friends that are soldiers. Share your stories with us!



posted on Mar, 25 2005 @ 06:09 PM
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I'm not posting my opinion on this thread, because of respect for the casaulties (military&civilian) in Iraqi war.



posted on Mar, 26 2005 @ 04:06 AM
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Originally posted by yanchek
I'm not posting my opinion on this thread, because of respect for the casaulties (military&civilian) in Iraqi war.


Do you not think it shows respect by relating stories and showing how are troops are doing?

Why write a comment like that in the first place if you have nothing to add? I'm sure we could all have got by without knowing that you didn't want to post.



posted on Mar, 29 2005 @ 12:39 AM
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Bump...

I think this topic is interesting, and some excellent debating going on. Maybe some missed it.



posted on Mar, 29 2005 @ 01:17 PM
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Why are people so willing to listen to all the 'conspiracy theories' and accusations about allied soldier, rather than to share and listen to the stories and experience of the soldiers themselves?.....Come on, i know there are many out there that have some great stories to share. Or maybe some thoughts to share and debate on?

Thanks to those that have contributed stories and thoughts.

Carburetor



posted on Mar, 29 2005 @ 01:39 PM
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Originally posted by Mr Carburetor
Why are people so willing to listen to all the 'conspiracy theories' and accusations about allied soldier, rather than to share and listen to the stories and experience of the soldiers themselves?.....Come on, i know there are many out there that have some great stories to share. Or maybe some thoughts to share and debate on?

Thanks to those that have contributed stories and thoughts.

Carburetor


Because this is a conspiracy forum? So in essence this thread like many others should not even be here.

But I too enjoy reading some of these stories so please do not take what I have said as a complaint.



posted on Mar, 29 2005 @ 02:11 PM
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Originally posted by Kriz_4

Originally posted by Mr Carburetor
Why are people so willing to listen to all the 'conspiracy theories' and accusations about allied soldier, rather than to share and listen to the stories and experience of the soldiers themselves?.....Come on, i know there are many out there that have some great stories to share. Or maybe some thoughts to share and debate on?

Thanks to those that have contributed stories and thoughts.

Carburetor


Because this is a conspiracy forum? So in essence this thread like many others should not even be here.

But I too enjoy reading some of these stories so please do not take what I have said as a complaint.


I understand this is a conspiracy forum. But i believe a soldier's experiences have every right to be in the "War on Terrorism " forum. It offers another eye view from our soldiers and their families. I'm glad you read some of the stories and enjoyed them. However i ask that instead of trying to remind me of the website i joined, i ask for your contribution of a story or thoughts about our soldiers and their experiences.

no offense taken and surely none intended


Carburetor



posted on Mar, 31 2005 @ 05:23 PM
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www.idahostatesman.com.../20050324/NEWS01/503240373/1022

This was kind of an interesting story about our soldiers i thought i would share.

KIRKUK, Iraq — 1st Lt. Jon Frye of Eagle held a small blue sandal against the sole of the child's bare foot.

"Will they fit?" he asked. He fussed until he was satisfied the sandals were the right size. "OK, very good."
Frye moved to another hospital bed, where a mother cradled an infant. He handed her a pair of sandals for her baby. "They're kind of big, but the baby will grow real fast," Frye said.

He continued to other beds, handing out Nerf footballs, plastic harmonicas, flying discs and candy necklaces.
The hospital visit was no Army-initiated photo op. "Operation Eagle" was the brainchild of kick-boxing student Kelly Anderson to help the husband of her teacher, Donna Frye, at the Rocky Mountain Fitness gym in Eagle. Months of effort brought seven soldiers from the Idaho Army Guard's 116th Brigade Combat Team to the children's floor of the Azadi hospital Wednesday in Kirkuk.

The children looked a little confused and overwhelmed. Their dimly lit hospital room was filled with U.S. soldiers in full battle gear, carrying boxes of sandals, socks, blankets, toys and candy.



posted on Mar, 31 2005 @ 07:12 PM
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My dads good friend from college was just called out of the reserves and put in charge of the 3rd MEU's (marine expiditionary unit) medical department (sorry I don't know the proper term). He is training right now before they send him over.

At 50 some odd years old, the guy LOVES the fact he is going in there and is going to be able to help our boys. He had just retired from his medical practice and was getting bored, then the next thing he knows he's doing live firing with any weapon he wants (as a high ranking officer).

He is a vet of Vietnam, and has served in the Army and Navy, and now it seems the Marines. I'll probably get some good stories from him when he gets over there.



posted on Mar, 31 2005 @ 07:55 PM
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Mr. C, good to hear your brother returned home safely. I hope everyone returning, and the troops still stationed realize that caring Americans respect wholeheartedly the sacrifices and risk burdening them. Again, thanks for sharing.



posted on Mar, 31 2005 @ 07:58 PM
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Almost forgot, my wife's friend's son just came home also. He'll be going back, don't know when though.



posted on Mar, 31 2005 @ 09:16 PM
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I posted, much earlier on, in this thread as a sympathetic bystander. But truth to tell, I am an old vet of the Viet Nam War Games. I teach a style of martial art called Kenpo. I say that, only to say this. I currently have three students who either have been in Iraq, or are going back. One is a fine young lady. Her and her husband were both over there. She is in Military Intelligence for the Army. One is not even a "legal" citizen of the United States, but is Japanese. He is an armorer for one of the Armored divisions, and he is seconded as a sniper. Another was in Afghanistan as a US Marine. He came back to complete his US Marine Force Recon training and has returned.

Thank God, my three made it through without injury or death. But it is a great thing that they are willing to put their lives on the line for a our nation. Regardless of their political beliefs.

My heart swells with pride, knowing that I am in the lives of young men and women such as these.

I am truly humbled by such as these, and the others whose stories you all have chosen to share.

God bless them one and all.



posted on Apr, 1 2005 @ 12:44 AM
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Thanks for that.. i too have trained in Kenpo. I also teach Wado-Ryu and Kobu-jutsu.
Nice to finally here some more tales from our troops.



posted on Apr, 1 2005 @ 10:34 AM
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Ok this is very strange. What a coincidence!!

I actually train in Okinawa Kenpo and Kabudo from a sensei who trained under Grandmaster Sensei Sekeishi Odo. Very nice to meet you gentleman!! I've been training for about 4 years now, however nowhere near experienced enough to actually train others as it seems you gentleman do. My highest respects to you gents


Sorry to be of topic, but just thought i would bring that up.

Carburetor



posted on Apr, 1 2005 @ 11:02 AM
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Originally posted by American Mad Man
My dads good friend from college was just called out of the reserves and put in charge of the 3rd MEU's (marine expiditionary unit) medical department (sorry I don't know the proper term). He is training right now before they send him over.

At 50 some odd years old, the guy LOVES the fact he is going in there and is going to be able to help our boys. He had just retired from his medical practice and was getting bored, then the next thing he knows he's doing live firing with any weapon he wants (as a high ranking officer).

He is a vet of Vietnam, and has served in the Army and Navy, and now it seems the Marines. I'll probably get some good stories from him when he gets over there.


Thats pretty cool man. At age 50 being able to get back out there with the boys. Its great that he has a good attitude and ambition for it. I know alot of other vets at that age would be going nuts being put back in a situation like that. Thanks for sharing American MadMan, and i'll be wishing your dad's friend the best of luck!!!



posted on Apr, 5 2005 @ 12:07 PM
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Originally posted by Mr Carburetor
Ok this is very strange. What a coincidence!!

I actually train in Okinawa Kenpo and Kabudo from a sensei who trained under Grandmaster Sensei Sekeishi Odo. Very nice to meet you gentleman!! I've been training for about 4 years now, however nowhere near experienced enough to actually train others as it seems you gentleman do. My highest respects to you gents


Sorry to be of topic, but just thought i would bring that up.

Carburetor


Hell of a coincidence eh?
Thanks for the respect. I have trained for the last 35 years, and don't intend to stop. I also taught my son who started when he was 5 years old.



posted on Apr, 5 2005 @ 01:37 PM
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Here are some more great experiences from some of our soldiers.
Some of these stories are very touching.

www.idahostatesman.com.../20050324/NEWS01/50324001/1002

www.idahostatesman.com.../20050401/NEWS01/50331007/1002

www.idahostatesman.com.../20050404/NEWS01/50403002/1002

Bikereddie, congrats on 35 years of martial arts study. Thats a great achievement. Since i graduated college, ive managed to stay consistent with it for 4 years as mentioned earlier,....and i can only hope to reach a 35 year accomplishment some day. Sounds like it runs strong in your family. Im sure you are very proud of your son.



posted on Apr, 7 2005 @ 12:52 PM
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Im sure you are very proud of your son.


I cant put into words how i feel about my son right now.

Thanks for the compliments and i will pas them on to my son who has access to this site. Not sure how often he gets to read the forum though, but i do know he has read things before.



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