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Covid-19 Vaccine Protocols

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posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 11:24 AM
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Welcome to the Apocalypse!


This is a collection of somewhat critical articles on vaccine protocols and their efficacy. Plus a recent risk assessment from the EU on cluster 5, the mutation in mink.
I don't wanna steer this discussion in any direction, here's a lot to unpack. And even more dots to connect. May this serve as a place to ponder implications and brainstorm with friends and foes alike.



Moderna, Pfizer, AstraZeneca, and Johnson & Johnson are leading candidates for the completion of a Covid-19 vaccine likely to be released in the coming months. These companies have published their vaccine trial protocols. This unusually transparent action during a major drug trial deserves praise, close inspection of the protocols raises surprising concerns. These trials seem designed to prove their vaccines work, even if the measured effects are minimal.

Covid-19 Vaccine Protocols Reveal That Trials Are Designed To Succeed
 


WASHINGTON — When President Trump unveiled Operation Warp Speed in May, he declared that it was “unlike anything our country has seen since the Manhattan Project.”

The initiative — to accelerate the development of Covid-19 vaccines and therapeutics — lacks the scale, and the degree of secrecy, of the effort to build the atomic bomb. But Operation Warp Speed is largely an abstraction in Washington, with little known about who works there other than its top leaders, or how it operates. Even pharmaceutical companies hoping to offer help or partnerships have labored to figure out who to contact.

Now, an organizational chart of the $10 billion initiative, obtained by STAT, reveals the fullest picture yet of Operation Warp Speed: a highly structured organization in which military personnel vastly outnumber civilian scientists.

New document reveals scope and structure of Operation Warp Speed and underscores vast military involvement
 


We are likely to need several Covid-19 vaccines to cover everyone and as a contingency, in case the virus mutates and “escapes” the ability of one vaccine to neutralise it, a real possibility in light of the discovery of an altered form of Sars-CoV-2 infecting European mink. But we also need better methods of diagnosing and treating the disease. The recent suspension of two major vaccine trials due to serious adverse events is a salutary reminder that there’s much still to learn and a pandemic, while no one would wish for one, provides scientists with a golden opportunity for learning.

Why the race to find Covid-19 vaccines is far from over
 


"The impact of mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 S protein on viral infectivity and antigenicity have been assessed for eighty natural variants and twenty-six glycosylation spike variant strains using a pseudovirus assay [51]. Most variants observed with amino acid change in the receptor binding domain were less infectious, while some variants - including A475V, L452R, V483A and F490L - were resistant to some neutralising antibodies.

Detection of new SARS-CoV-2 variants related to mink
edit on 29-11-2020 by PublicOpinion because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-11-2020 by PublicOpinion because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 11:30 AM
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a reply to: PublicOpinion


We are likely to need several Covid-19 vaccines to cover everyone and as a contingency, in case the virus mutates and “escapes” the ability of one vaccine to neutralise it


I really hate the language used throughout all this covid #. Like what the # kind of nonsense is that. We're talking about a virus not a #ing ninja chameleon.

Cover everyone, escapes, neutralizing it with a vaccine.

Like that # doesn't even make sense.



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 11:38 AM
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a reply to: dug88

I like the swearing, but no.



Cover everyone, escapes, not neutralizing it with a vaccine.


Fixed it for you.
And that would be the working-hypothesis in a nutshell.



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: PublicOpinion

once you have had Covid 19, can you get it again?



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 11:45 AM
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Beware the saboteurs ❗

Beware the mink strain ❗

🚨



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: PublicOpinion

Quick question, have they released the ingredients anywhere that you have seen?



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: network dude

Yes.

a reply to: elementalgrove

No, only rough differentiation like what we see in the articles.
I don't wanna mess with industrial espionage.
edit on 29-11-2020 by PublicOpinion because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 11:52 AM
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They call this a virus but anti-parasitic pills seem to kill it ie horse/dog worming tablets with added zinc





posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 12:45 PM
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originally posted by: PublicOpinion
a reply to: network dude

Yes.

a reply to: elementalgrove

No, only rough differentiation like what we see in the articles.
I don't wanna mess with industrial espionage.


Lol no espionage needed, before anyone takes a vaccine they have the right to see the ingredients.



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: elementalgrove

Technically, I don't even know if the terminology "vaccines" applies here.


A recent, non-peer reviewed study from Imperial College London found that immunity to Covid-19 may decline over time, as levels of protective antibodies reportedly fell rapidly after infection.

However, according to Deepta Bhattacharya, an immunologist at the University of Arizona, there is emerging evidence that reinfections with common cold coronaviruses are a “result of viral genetic variations”, which may not be relevant to Sars-CoV-2.

Immunity against coronavirus lasts at least eight months, new study finds



vaccine
[ˈvaksiːnˈvaksɪn]

a substance used to stimulate the production of antibodies and provide immunity against one or several diseases, prepared from the causative agent of a disease, its products, or a synthetic substitute, treated to act as an antigen without inducing the disease.

edit on 29-11-2020 by PublicOpinion because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 12:59 PM
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a reply to: PublicOpinion

With the success of Hydroxychloroquine as a prophylactic or the combo hydroxychloroquine/azithromycin/zinc early after catching the disease I see no reason for anyone to have to take the vaccine.

Add to that the therapeutics being develop (regeneron) as well as other I look forward to learning about, the vaccine is unnecessary.

Also factoring in the recovery rate helps.



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 01:05 PM
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a reply to: elementalgrove

Source?



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 01:38 PM
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According to the Chief Medical Officer and Chief Scientist here in the U.K, even if you have the vaccine, you will still be required to wear a mask and follow social distancing rules.

So I can only ask why bother having the vaccine?

We are told by our politicians that we could be back to some kind of normal in spring. Our health experts are a lot more cautious though, and a number of the government’s own M.P’s are startling to push back on the scientists. It looks like there could be a rebellion in parliament next week from up to 70 Tory M.P’s.



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 01:53 PM
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a reply to: PublicOpinion

Ford study


According to a protocol-based treatment algorithm, among hospitalized patients, use of hydroxychloroquine alone and in combination with azithromycin was associated with a significant reduction in-hospital mortality compared to not receiving hydroxychloroquine.


Another one just game out...

Study finds 84% fewer hospitalization for patients treated with controverial drug hydroxychlorquine


The study found that “the odds of hospitalisation of treated patients was 84% less than in the untreated patients,” and only one patient died from the group being treated with the drugs compared to 13 deaths in the untreated group.

edit on America/ChicagoSundayAmerica/Chicago11America/Chicago1130pmSunday1 by elementalgrove because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 02:05 PM
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a reply to: elementalgrove



Other early studies of hydroxychloroquine have reported conflicting results (Gao et al., 2020, Gautret et al., 2020b, Chen et al., 2020a, Tang et al., 2020, Chen et al., 2020b, Yu et al., 2020, Geleris et al., 2020, Rosenberg et al., 2020, Magagnoli et al., 2020, Million et al., 2020).

Treatment with hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, and combination in patients hospitalized with COVID-19

Anyhow, let's get back to the vaccines.
edit on 29-11-2020 by PublicOpinion because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 03:57 PM
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a reply to: PublicOpinion

It's the words used...

Language and choice of words makes a difference. Using military language and terms that anthropomorphize something that is barely alive is called propaganda. It turns it into a dangerous intelligent foe that needs to be engaged, instead of what it is. Some RNA inside a protein casing that pretty much exists as a passive thing trying to replicate itself.
edit on 29/11/2020 by dug88 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 04:02 PM
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OK, so if antibodies are only good for 8 months, what's the point of the vaccine again?

We won't kill it because the vaccine is not 100% effective, so it will still be out there, and we're all signing ourselves up for shots every 8 months, and they're also saying we can't even then get back to normal?! (More masks ... more social distancing ... even after)

So answer me ... what's the point? Especially since it's something that won't kill almost everyone who gets it and many don't even know they have it.

I can maybe see it for someone who has heightened risk factors, but not necessarily for the general pop.

**EDIT**

Oh, and I forgot the side effects. After the first does, you can get a nasty local swelling along with high fever and all the symptoms of moderate to severe COVID minus the illness. So now you're looking at a repeat experience every 8 months where you spend time being ill in order to avoid being ill and still having to maintain social distancing and masks all the time?!
edit on 29-11-2020 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 29 2020 @ 06:53 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Yup. Sounds like you got it nailed down.

Just add in the mandatory part and the windfall profit part for big pharma and you are dead on.



posted on Nov, 30 2020 @ 03:31 AM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Vaccines are still going to safe lives with milder outcomes due to the antibodies. At least some of them, for a while.

But the ongoing mutations in animals reduce the efficacy even further. We'll likely need new vaccines once the virus mutated enough to render them entirely useless.

It's a very questionable merger of the state and big pharma, to say the least, with too much military personnel involved to not make your head spin. We should start to ponder alternatives regarding this return to normal we'll likely never see. Neither our politicians, nor the corporations, are going to break the news, or discuss a different approach than falling back on vaccines with quick openings ASAP. This would be entirely on us, again (again).

And I'm not sure we're ready to have this debate.



posted on Dec, 3 2020 @ 12:00 PM
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why are they pushing for a worldwide vaccination program when only 3% of infected have died? And 92 odd percent of deaths have been in the elderly (over 70)??

Why not just give the vaccine to those aged over 60?




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